INS 2020 Virtual Conference Recordings Package

INS 2020 Virtual will come directly to you, in the comfort of your own home or office! Here you have the ability to view all 30 sessions at your convenience. The entire program has been approved for 30 Contact Hours and 60 CRNI® RUs and meetings the INS meetings criteria.

  • INS Town Hall

    Contains 2 Component(s)

    Please join us for our Virtual Town Hall as we chat about the future of our specialty. This is your opportunity to share your thoughts and let us know what direction you would like us to take. Both the INS and INCC Board of Directors will be there to field your questions. Bring your coffee, tea, or favorite beverage and enjoy!

    Please join us for our Virtual Town Hall as we chat about the future of our specialty. This is your opportunity to share your thoughts and let us know what direction you would like us to take. Both the INS and INCC Board of Directors will be there to field your questions. Bring your coffee, tea, or favorite beverage and enjoy!  

    Angelia Sims, MSN, RN, CRNI®, OCN®

    INS President

    Angie is the manager of nursing services for Compass Oncology in the Portland, Oregon/Vancouver, Washington area, where she oversees infusion operations and activities across 3 states. Angie has experience in oncology and outpatient infusion service and has managed an IV team, dialysis unit, and outpatient infusion unit. She has served on the INCC RN exam council and on the INS board of directors as a director-at-large. Angie previously served as president of her local INS chapter and was named INS chapter president of the year in 2010. She had presented at numerous conferences, reviewed policy and procedure manuals, and contributed to the revised edition of IV Therapy Made Incredibly Easy. Angie has been a CRNI® since 1999 and an OCN® since 2000

    Kathy Puglise, MSN/ED, BSN, RN, CRNI®

    INCC Chair

    Kathy has been a registered nurse for 34 years. She has clinical experience in emergency room, critical care, and infusion nursing. Kathy has a master of science in nursing with a specialization in health care education. Kathy served as president of the INS Board of Directors from 2012 to 2013. In addition, she was on the INCC RN Council as an expert in question development and evaluation of the CRNI® from 2003 to 2011. She currently serves as the director of nursing for the Specialty Pharmacy Certification Board. Kathy is employed by Smiths Medical on the professional services team as a clinical manager of home infusion and pharmacy services.

    Mary Alexander, MA, RN, CRNI®, CAE, FAAN

    INS Chief Executive Officer

    Mary Alexander, MA, RN, CRNI®, CAE, FAAN, has served as CEO of the Infusion Nurses Society (INS) and Infusion Nurses Certification Corporation, since 1997. She is also editor-in-chief of the Journal of Infusion Nursing, the Core Curriculum for Infusion Nursing, and INS’ textbook, Infusion Nursing: An Evidence-Based Approach. In addition, Mary represented INS on the panel that revised the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Guidelines for the Prevention of Intravascular Catheter-Related Infections, in 2011. She speaks globally on topics such as the benefits of the specialty practice of infusion nursing, the development of standards of practice, and improving patient safety.

    One of the most rewarding aspects of INS membership is giving back to the organization and the specialty by serving on the board of directors. By serving, you will have the opportunity to expand your professional network, provide strategic guidance, and be an advocate for the infusion nursing specialty.

    INS board members serve either a two, or three-year term beginning in May. Each year the board meets in person, attends the INS Annual Meeting, and participates in several virtual meetings.

    We will have 3 positions available in 2021:
    President-Elect
    Director at Large
    Secretary Treasurer

    You will find a job-description for each of these positions attached to this email.
    If you are interested in pursuing a position, please submit your application by October 15, 2020.

  • Fact vs Fiction: Lymphedema and Vascular Access Post Breast Cancer-Related Surgery

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Lymphedema is a potential complication of breast cancer related surgery. The impact and morbidity of lymphedema on a person’s quality of life is well known; however, the sequelae that cause its development remains a mystery. The gap in understanding this pathology complicates a clinicians’ ability to provide useful prevention strategies. Treatment options for BCRL have dramatically improved over the last 20 years, yet vascular access recommendations continue to be based on anecdotal rather than scientific evidence. This session will discuss the pathophysiology of lymphedema, vascular access options, and current evidence-based recommendations for patients with BCRL.

    Lymphedema is a potential complication of breast cancer related surgery. The impact and morbidity of lymphedema on a person’s quality of life is well known; however, the sequelae that cause its development remains a mystery. The gap in understanding this pathology complicates a clinicians’ ability to provide useful prevention strategies. Treatment options for BCRL have dramatically improved over the last 20 years, yet vascular access recommendations continue to be based on anecdotal rather than scientific evidence. This session will discuss the pathophysiology of lymphedema, vascular access options, and current evidence-based recommendations for patients with BCRL.

    Learning Outcomes: 

    At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to describe the pathophysiology and impact of lymphedema for post breast cancer surgery patients as well as vascular access options for this patient population.

    Karen Laforet, MClSc-WH, RN, CNHC(c), VA-BC, CVAA(C), IIWCC

    Karen Laforet, RN, MClSc-WH, CNHC(c), VA-BC, CVAA(c), is registered nurse certified in community health nursing. She has a Master’s in clinical science, wound healing and dual certification in infusion therapy/vascular access. She has 18 years of critical care nursing experience and more than 20 years of experience working in the home care sector. For just shy of 10 years, she was Director of Nursing, as well as professional practice lead for community nursing clinics, working with patients with complications of lymphedema.

  • Special Considerations for Geriatric Patients and Drug Therapy

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    While older adults age 65 and older make up only 12.8% of the nation's total population, these folks consume 33% of prescribed medications. Acuity, co-morbidities, polypharmacy, higher sensitivity, and individual variation to therapies all contribute to this excessive consumption. Nurses play a critically important role in promoting adherence for all drug therapies: oral, injection, and infusion medications. This session will review the contributing factors to disproportionate drug therapy consumption for the older adult population, discuss pathophysiology and sensitivity to drug therapy, and the growing costs associated with nonadherence. By the end of the session participants will be able to identify key initiatives health care providers can implement immediately to promote drug therapy adherence.

    While older adults age 65 and older make up only 12.8% of the nation's total population, these folks consume 33% of prescribed medications. Acuity, co-morbidities, polypharmacy, higher sensitivity, and individual variation to therapies all contribute to this excessive consumption. Nurses play a critically important role in promoting adherence for all drug therapies: oral, injection, and infusion medications. This session will review the contributing factors to disproportionate drug therapy consumption for the older adult population, discuss pathophysiology and sensitivity to drug therapy, and the growing costs associated with nonadherence. By the end of the session participants will be able to identify key initiatives health care providers can implement immediately to promote drug therapy adherence.

    Learning Outcomes: 

    At the conclusion of this session, attendees will be able to discuss the contributing factors to disproportionate drug therapy consumption for the older adult population, pathophysiology and sensitivity to drug therapy, and what actions to take to promote drug therapy adherence.

    Jessica McNish, BSN, RN, CHFN, CRNI®

    Jessica J. McNish, BSN, RN, CHFN, CRNI®, has 15 years of both inpatient and outpatient nursing experience, with a focus on cardiology and heart failure patients. Jessica manages a nationwide, outpatient heart failure program that specifically cares for complex, end stage patients. She is also currently pursuing a master’s degree in nursing from Texas Tech University, with a concentration on the geriatric population. Jessica is certified as both a heart failure nurse and an infusion nurse.

  • Safe Handling of Hazardous Drugs in Home Infusion Therapy

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    In the acute care or outpatient setting, health care institutions are required to provide safe handling hazardous drugs (HDs) education. This much needed education is commonplace for the hospital, infusion, or clinic nurse. However, as more and more HDs are being administered in the home, home infusion nurses have expressed a disparity for education on safe handling in the home care setting. This session will discuss the modalities of exposure to HDs for home infusion nurses as caregivers including the proper use of personal protective equipment (PPE), chemotherapy spill prevention and cleanup, proper disposal of HDs, and methods to reduce HD exposure.

    In the acute care or outpatient setting, health care institutions are required to provide safe handling hazardous drugs (HDs) education. This much needed education is commonplace for the hospital, infusion, or clinic nurse. However, as more and more HDs are being administered in the home, home infusion nurses have expressed a disparity for education on safe handling in the home care setting. This session will discuss the modalities of exposure to HDs for home infusion nurses as caregivers including the proper use of personal protective equipment (PPE), chemotherapy spill prevention and cleanup, proper disposal of HDs, and methods to reduce HD exposure.

    Learning Outcomes: 

    At the conclusion of this session, attendees will be able to define hazardous drugs (HDs), proper use and disposal of PPE, and steps to chemotherapy spill prevention.

    Seth Eisenberg, RN, ASN, OCN®, BMTCN™

    Seattle Cancer Care Alliance

    Seth Eisenberg has practiced in the field of oncology since 1983. His experience includes 31 years in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. He has published articles on hazardous drug safety, chemotherapy, and biotherapy, as well as three book chapters, including a one for Joint Commission Resources. Seth also has presented at national and international nursing and pharmacy conferences, and has been the principal investigator in two published nursing research studies.

    Christina Klein, MSN, RN, CRNI®, OCN

    Christina Klein, MSN, RN, CRNI®, OCN, has been practicing for over 30 years, in a variety of care settings. She has been an oncology nurse for over 10 years and earned her OCN and CRNI® certifications in 2013. She obtained her MSN and certificate in Education in 2017 from Thomas Edison State University. She is currently the oncology Educator at Cancer Treatment Center of America in Philadelphia. Christina is also adjunct faculty at Community College of Philadelphia and continues to work part time as an outpatient infusion nurse.

  • Pediatric Pain Management

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Pain management is an essential component of pediatric care. Studies show that when compared to adults, children are often not treated adequately for pain. Identification of the presence and severity of pain in children is challenging due to many factors including cognitive and developmental levels. Psychologic, physiologic, behavioral, and situational factors also impact the pediatric pain experience. This presentation will provide in-depth information on techniques for assessment and management of pediatric pain based on the child’s cognitive ability and stage of development.

    Pain management is an essential component of pediatric care. Studies show that when compared to adults, children are often not treated adequately for pain. Identification of the presence and severity of pain in children is challenging due to many factors including cognitive and developmental levels. Psychologic, physiologic, behavioral, and situational factors also impact the pediatric pain experience. This presentation will provide in-depth information on techniques for assessment and management of pediatric pain based on the child’s cognitive ability and stage of development.

    Learning Outcomes:

    At the conclusion of this session will be able to verbalize the importance of appropriate pain management in relation to patient/family satisfaction as well as identify a pain assessment tool appropriate for pediatric pain.

    Sarah Nelson, PhD

    Dr. Sarah Nelson, PHD, is a Staff Psychologist at Boston Children’s Hospital. She is also an Instructor in Psychology at Harvard Medical School. Dr. Nelson is a clinician and researcher in the field of pediatric chronic pain. Clinically, Dr. Nelson engages patients from all over the world in pain clinic evaluations. She delivers weekly therapy to patients with chronic pain, in the Boston area. With respect to research, Dr. Nelson is interested in how psychological trauma or chronic stress relates to chronic pain on a neurobiological level.

  • Infusion Therapy Basic Boot Camp

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Proper care and maintenance of vascular access devices (VADs) are two of the most important competencies for the emerging infusion nurse to master in order to prevent VAD-related complications. INS’ Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice provides a foundation of evidence-based best practice techniques and skills that every infusion nurse should know. This session will discuss these basic infusion therapy principles in detail, including anatomy and physiology of the vasculature, proper flushing, sterile dressing changes, and correct technique for blood sampling. The presenter will also discuss ways participants can implement these competencies into their organizations.

    Proper care and maintenance of vascular access devices (VADs) are two of the most important competencies for the emerging infusion nurse to master in order to prevent VAD-related complications. INS’ Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice provides a foundation of evidence-based best practice techniques and skills that every infusion nurse should know. This session will discuss these basic infusion therapy principles in detail, including anatomy and physiology of the vasculature, proper flushing, sterile dressing changes, and correct technique for blood sampling. The presenter will also discuss ways participants can implement these competencies into their organizations.

    Learning Outcomes:

    At the end of this session, attendees will be able to describe how to implement evidence-based practices when using, caring for and maintaining peripheral and central VADs.

    Sarah Knudsvig, RN

    Registered Nurse Clinical Staff Educator, UW Health in Madison, WI

    Sarah Knudsvig, RN, MSN, is a Registered Nurse Clinical Staff Educator at UW Health in Madison, WI. She is an organizational resource for vascular access care, maintenance, and insertion for clinical staff across 135 ambulatory sites. Sarah holds a Bachelor of Science in Nursing from the University of Mary in Bismarck, North Dakota and a Master of Science in Nursing from Benedictine University in Lisle, Illinois.

  • Safe Implementation of a Midline Catheter Program in a 5-Hospital Network

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Midline catheters are important tools in the quest to provide patients with the right vascular access device at the right time. However, patient harm can occur when these catheters are not managed appropriately. This session will provide an overview of safety risks associated with midline catheters and methods to improve patient safety. Presenters will describe outline steps taken at a 5-hospital network to implement evidence-based guidelines, including proper device selection, accurate labeling, and identifying potential complications with commonly infused medications.

    Midline catheters are important tools in the quest to provide patients with the right vascular access device at the right time. However, patient harm can occur when these catheters are not managed appropriately. This session will provide an overview of safety risks associated with midline catheters and methods to improve patient safety. Presenters will describe outline steps taken at a 5-hospital network to implement evidence-based guidelines, including proper device selection, accurate labeling, and identifying potential complications with commonly infused medications.

    Learning Outcomes:

    At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to identify safety risks associated with the use of midline catheters and list potential methods to mediate these risks.

    ​Judy S. Smith, MSN, RN, CRNI®, VA-BC

    Clinical Manager of Vascular Access, Ascension Seton

    Judy S. Smith, MSN, RN, CRNI®, VA-BC, has been a vascular access nurse for 20 years. She is currently Clinical Manager of Vascular Access at Ascension Seton in Austin, Texas. Judy has published studies on nurse behavioral intention, related to best practice techniques for needleless connector disinfection, as well time required for disinfection of needleless connectors. She has been a speaker at several local and national conferences and served as keynote speaker at Intravenous Nursing New Zealand in 2012. 

  • Complications and Outcomes of CVADs in Pediatric Home Care Patients: A 2-Year Study

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    As health care moves from hospital to home, there is little data on the frequency of complications and outcomes of central venous catheters (CVCs) in pediatric home care patients. It is unknown if family/caregivers, in lieu of nurses managing CVCs in this population, contribute to risk factors for complications. This presentation highlights data that was obtained during a 2-year prospective study of complications associated with CVCs in pediatric home care patients. A total of 222 CVCs were studied and measured for skin and catheter complications, CLABSI occurrences, CVC survival analysis, and need for alteplase treatment. A unique metric captured a comparison of complication rates between the family/caregiver and home care nurses. Data analysis, challenges, and outcomes of the study will be discussed.

    As health care moves from hospital to home, there is little data on the frequency of complications and outcomes of central venous catheters (CVCs) in pediatric home care patients. It is unknown if family/caregivers, in lieu of nurses managing CVCs in this population, contribute to risk factors for complications. This presentation highlights data that was obtained during a 2-year prospective study of complications associated with CVCs in pediatric home care patients. A total of 222 CVCs were studied and measured for skin and catheter complications, CLABSI occurrences, CVC survival analysis, and need for alteplase treatment. A unique metric captured a comparison of complication rates between the family/caregiver and home care nurses. Data analysis, challenges, and outcomes of the study will be discussed.

    Learning Outcomes:

    At the conclusion of this session, participants will Identify risk factors which may contribute to central line complications and CLABSIs within the pediatric, medically complex home care patient.

    Michelle Curley, RN, CRNI®

    Michelle Curley, RN, CRNI®, is DON for infusion and skilled nurse divisions at Pediatric Home Service in Roseville, MN. She has a passion for infection prevention, especially with the pediatric home care population. In 2013, she collaborated with NHIA to create CVAD Guidelines for Pediatric Home Care Patients, later published in the Journal for the Association of Vascular Access. In 2016, her team concluded a 2-year study on central line complications in pediatric home care patients.

  • The Impact of Product Selection on Patient Outcomes

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    In this session, the speaker will engage participants in a discussion about how to review and appraise evidence and standards of practice to help guide and influence decision-making, as it relates to product selection. Concepts of empowerment, accountability, and professionalism within the discipline of nursing will guide an inspirational message for nurses to help get a seat at the decision-making table in the future, to impact patient care and outcomes.

    Commercial Support: Baxter

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    How can your engagement in product selection impact patient outcomes?

    In this session, the speaker will engage participants in a discussion about how to review and appraise evidence and standards of practice to help guide and influence decision-making, as it relates to product selection. Concepts of empowerment, accountability, and professionalism within the discipline of nursing will guide an inspirational message for nurses to help get a seat at the decision-making table in the future, to impact patient care and outcomes. 

    Learning Outcomes: At the conclusion of this session, the participants will be to describe and critically appraise research evidence, and learn ways to apply the evidence, while engaging in product analysis process in healthcare organizations.

    ​Lorelle Wuerz PhD, MSN, RN, VA-BC, NEA-BC​

    Dr. Lorelle Wuerz PhD, MSN, RN, VA-BC, NEA-BC, is a visionary, innovative, results-oriented nursing leader, recognized as a high-energy team player who achieves successful results.  Lorelle holds a bachelor’s degree in Biology, Psychology and Music. In addition, she has a Master of Nursing Science (MSN) with a specialization in Leadership and Administration. She has completed her PhD in Nursing, also with a specialization in Leadership and Administration.  Dr. Wuerz is dually certified in Vascular Access and as a Nursing Executive Advanced. 

  • Drug-Induced Vascular Tissue Injury

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Understanding physiologic and pharmacologic factors that predispose patients to drug-induced vascular tissue damage are a necessary component of safe infusion therapy. Best practice includes effective application of principles and guidelines to minimize drug-induced vascular damage. This session will discuss factors impacting vascular injury, best practice guidelines, and care collaboration to reduce drug-induced vascular tissue damage.

    Understanding physiologic and pharmacologic factors that predispose patients to drug-induced vascular tissue damage are a necessary component of safe infusion therapy. Best practice includes effective application of principles and guidelines to minimize drug-induced vascular damage. This session will discuss factors impacting vascular injury, best practice guidelines, and care collaboration to reduce drug-induced vascular tissue damage.

    Learning Outcomes:

    At the conclusion of this session, attendees will be able to verbalize best practices to significantly reduce infusion drug-induced vascular tissue injuries.

    Marc Stranz, PharmD

    Marc Stranz, PharmD, has over 30 years of experience in sterile compounding and home infusion and is an accreditation surveyor for home infusion. He has spoken and published on drug-induced phlebitis and extravasation injury since 2002.