Infusion Therapy Related Complications

This Infusion Nurses Society virtual symposium addresses 5 challenging aspects involved in the delivery of infusion therapy: managing infusion reactions, preserving skin integrity, identifying and intervening with infiltrations and extravasations, and recognizing and managing implanted port complications and competency validation. Registrants will receive 5 Contact Hours and 10 Recertification Units and will have the ability to view anything they miss on-demand. This will be an informative and beneficial conference for all infusion professionals!

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Competency is a required level of effective performance in the work environment defined by adherence to professional standards, including knowledge, skills, abilities, and judgment based on established science. Due to its invasive, high-risk nature, the clinician with responsibility for VAD insertion, safe delivery of infusion therapy, and VAD management must demonstrate competency with each of these skills as well as with the comprehensive role of infusion nursing. The length of clinical experience and passive recurrent performance are not surrogates for clinical knowledge and procedural competence for experienced clinicians. So how can initial and ongoing competency be validated? In this session, attendees will learn about managing competency assessment and validation in 2 phases: initial competency and ongoing competency.

    Competency is a required level of effective performance in the work environment defined by adherence to professional standards, including knowledge, skills, abilities, and judgment based on established science. Due to its invasive, high-risk nature, the clinician with responsibility for VAD insertion, safe delivery of infusion therapy, and VAD management must demonstrate competency with each of these skills as well as with the comprehensive role of infusion nursing. The length of clinical experience and passive recurrent performance are not surrogates for clinical knowledge and procedural competence for experienced clinicians. So how can initial and ongoing competency be validated? In this session, attendees will learn about managing competency assessment and validation in 2 phases: initial competency and ongoing competency.

    Lynn Hadaway, M.Ed., RN, NPD-BC, CRNI®

    President

    Lynn Hadaway Associates, Inc.

    Lynn Hadaway, M.Ed., RN, NPD-BC, CRNI®, has 50 years’ experience in infusion nursing and adult education. Her clinical experience comes from infusion therapy teams in multiple acute care settings. She is president of Lynn Hadaway Associates, Inc., an education and consulting company started in 1996.

    She holds two national certifications—infusion nursing from the Infusion Nurses Certification Corporation and nursing professional development from the American Nurses Credentialing Center. She also holds a master’s in education from the University of Georgia.

    She has authored more than 70 published articles on infusion therapy and vascular access; written 8 textbook chapters on infusion therapy; and was the clinical editor for the textbook Infusion Therapy Made Incredibly Easy. She served on the Infusion Nurses Society Standards of Practice committees to revise the 2006, 2011, 2016, and 2021 documents. She served on the committees to revise the 2014 and 2022 Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) compendium central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) chapter and the 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC) CLABSI Implementation Guide. She also served as the chair of the INS Infusion Team Task Force and as a chairperson for the board of directors of the Infusion Nurses Certification Corporation, and is currently on the INS Vesicant Task Force.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Implanted vascular access devices (IVADs), commonly called ports, are central lines surgically placed in the body to facilitate long-term infusion therapy. Implanted ports differ in construct, size, and application and can be subject to technical difficulties which may lead to patient complications. In this session, learn more about trouble shooting complications and management. Topics include occlusions, malposition, infection, infiltration, and extravasation.

    Implanted vascular access devices (IVADs), commonly called ports, are central lines surgically placed in the body to facilitate long-term infusion therapy. Implanted ports differ in construct, size, and application and can be subject to technical difficulties which may lead to patient complications. In this session, learn more about trouble shooting complications and management. Topics include occlusions, malposition, infection, infiltration, and extravasation.

    Mary Jo Sarver, MN, ARNP, AOCN, CRNI®, VA-BC, LNC

    Nurse Practitioner and Clinical Nurse Specialist

    Providence Regional Medical Center Everett

    Mary Jo Sarver, MN, ARNP, AOCN, CRNI®, VA-BC, LNC, works at Providence Regional Medical Center Everett (PRMCE) in infusion services and cancer partnership. She has a dual role as a nurse practitioner and a clinical nurse specialist. She works with staff in acute care, outpatient clinics, homecare, and long-term care settings. She has been in oncology for 37 years and has participated on the local Puget Sound Oncology Nursing Society Board for over 20 years in multiple positions, including a term as president. She volunteers nationally through the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) and the Infusion Nursing Society (INS) on occasion as an exam writer and publication reviewer. She has spoken locally, regionally, and at the ONS congress, and has been widely published. Outside of her position at PRMCE, she works as a legal nurse consultant in infusion and oncology and runs her company Sarver Better Living Products, LLC.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The inadvertent administration of a solution, nonvesicant (infiltration) or vesicant (extravasation), into surrounding tissue can cause significant patient harm. Despite adherence to policies and procedures for vascular access device (VAD) insertion and care and management during infusion therapy, an infiltration or extravasation may occur. In this session, educational content addresses prevention, assessment, and interventions for infiltration and extravasation.

    The inadvertent administration of a solution, nonvesicant (infiltration) or vesicant (extravasation), into surrounding tissue can cause significant patient harm. Despite adherence to policies and procedures for vascular access device (VAD) insertion and care and management during infusion therapy, an infiltration or extravasation may occur. In this session, educational content addresses prevention, assessment, and interventions for infiltration and extravasation.

    Barb Nickel

    Barb Nickel is a clinical nurse specialist specializing in critical care and vascular access. Her role includes staff development, quality improvement, and clinical consultation. She had published numerous articles on infusion therapy and is chair of the 2022-2024 Infusion Nurses Society Standards of Practice Committee.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 03/02/2022

    For some patients, maintaining skin integrity is challenging. Many patients receiving infusion therapy have multiple comorbidities, including renal impairment, nutritional deficiencies, hematologic disorders, or cancer. These conditions can impair the skin surrounding the vascular access device (VAD) insertion site, which is vulnerable to being further injured or damaged during VAD insertion, care, and dressing changes. Skin injuries, such as medical adhesive-related skin injuries (MARSI), allergic and contact dermatitis and pressure injuries, often result. Each skin injury increases the risk for infection. In this session, attendees will learn how to identify VAD-associated skin injuries, their prevalence and risk factors, and strategies to ensure the prevention and treatment of these conditions, across dressing selection, application and much more.

    For some patients, maintaining skin integrity is challenging. Many patients receiving infusion therapy have multiple comorbidities, including renal impairment, nutritional deficiencies, hematologic disorders, or cancer. These conditions can impair the skin surrounding the vascular access device (VAD) insertion site, which is vulnerable to being further injured or damaged during VAD insertion, care, and dressing changes. Skin injuries, such as medical adhesive-related skin injuries (MARSI), allergic and contact dermatitis and pressure injuries, often result. Each skin injury increases the risk for infection. In this session, attendees will learn how to identify VAD-associated skin injuries, their prevalence and risk factors, and strategies to ensure the prevention and treatment of these conditions, across dressing selection, application and much more.

    Amanda Ullman, PhD, M App Sci, RN, GC PICU, GC Higher Ed

    Inaugural Professor and Chair in Paediatric Nursing

    University of Queensland and Children's Health Queensland

    Amanda J Ullman, PhD, M App Sci, RN, GC PICU, GC Higher Ed, is the inaugural Professor and Chair in Paediatric Nursing, conjoint between the University of Queensland and Children’s Health Queensland, and a 2021 Fulbright Future Scholar. Amanda believes that children should be able to receive medical treatment in hospitals without harm. Her research, which focuses on improving the most common invasive procedure in paediatrics—the insertion of an intravenous (IV) catheter, has changed practices, reduced infection and pain, and promoted efficient health care for children internationally. She has received investments by the National Health and Medical Research Council (NHMRC) and highly competitive awards; has been cited more than 100 research articles and two mHealth Apps; and according to Expertscape ranks as the top global expert in central venous catheters.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 03/02/2022

    All infusion reactions involve the immune system; however, some (anaphylactic) are allergic in nature whereas others (anaphylactoid) are not true allergic reactions. Although reactions can be allergic or nonallergic, the clinical manifestations are the same and require prompt, accurate assessment and management to avoid severe adverse events, including fatality. Content in this session addresses the nurses' role in patient risk assessment, institution of prophylactic measures, administration monitoring, severity grading, management, and follow-up care.

    All infusion reactions involve the immune system; however, some (anaphylactic) are allergic in nature whereas others (anaphylactoid) are not true allergic reactions. Although reactions can be allergic or nonallergic, the clinical manifestations are the same and require prompt, accurate assessment and management to avoid severe adverse events, including fatality. Content in this session addresses the nurses' role in patient risk assessment, institution of prophylactic measures, administration monitoring, severity grading, management, and follow-up care.

    Mary Alexander, MA, RN, CRNI®, CAE, FAAN

    Chief Executive Officer

    Infusion Nurses Society (INS)

    Mary Alexander, MA, RN, CRNI®, CAE, FAAN, has served as CEO of the Infusion Nurses Society (INS) and Infusion Nurses Certification Corporation, since 1997. She is also editor-in-chief of the Journal of Infusion Nursing, the Core Curriculum for Infusion Nursing, and INS’ textbook, Infusion Nursing: An Evidence-Based Approach. In addition, Mary represented INS on the panel that revised the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Guidelines for the Prevention of Intravascular Catheter-Related Infections, in 2011. She speaks globally on topics such as the benefits of the specialty practice of infusion nursing, the development of standards of practice, and improving patient safety.

    Wendy Vogel, MSN, FNP, AOCNP®

    Oncology Nurse Practitioner

    Advanced Practitioner Society for Hematology and Oncology

    Wendy H. Vogel, MSN, FNP, AOCNP®, is an oncology nurse practitioner from Kingsport, Tennessee. She received her BS in nursing at Tennessee Technological University and her MS in nursing in the Family Nurse Practitioner Program at East Tennessee State University. Ms. Vogel is a board-certified advanced oncology certified nurse practitioner through the Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation and a certified family nurse practitioner through the American Nurses Credentialing Center.

    As well as being the executive director and a founding board member of the Advanced Practitioner Society for Hematology and Oncology (APSHO), Ms. Vogel is an associate editor of the Journal of the Advanced Practitioner in Oncology (JADPRO) and has published in several professional journals and texts. She received the 2012 ONS Mary Nowotny Excellence in Cancer Nursing Education Award as well as the American Journal of Nursing Book of the Year Award for coediting the Advanced Oncology Nursing Certification Review and Resource Manual: Instructor’s Resource. She has lectured nationally and internationally on oncologic topics and the role of the advanced practitioner.

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    Please complete the meeting evaluation to receive your continuing education certificate. Your feedback is important, as it helps INS better serve you and the membership. We need your input to continue to provide you with quality programs.

    Please complete the meeting evaluation to receive your continuing education certificate. Your feedback is important, as it helps INS better serve you and the membership. We need your input to continue to provide you with quality programs.