INS 2020 Virtual Conference Recordings Package

INS 2020 Virtual will come directly to you, in the comfort of your own home or office! Here you have the ability to view all 30 sessions at your convenience. The entire program has been approved for 30 Contact Hours and 60 CRNI® RUs and meetings the INS meetings criteria.

  • Contains 2 Component(s)

    Please join us for our Virtual Town Hall as we chat about the future of our specialty. This is your opportunity to share your thoughts and let us know what direction you would like us to take. Both the INS and INCC Board of Directors will be there to field your questions. Bring your coffee, tea, or favorite beverage and enjoy!

    Please join us for our Virtual Town Hall as we chat about the future of our specialty. This is your opportunity to share your thoughts and let us know what direction you would like us to take. Both the INS and INCC Board of Directors will be there to field your questions. Bring your coffee, tea, or favorite beverage and enjoy!  

    Angelia Sims, MSN, RN, CRNI®, OCN®

    INS President

    Angie is the manager of nursing services for Compass Oncology in the Portland, Oregon/Vancouver, Washington area, where she oversees infusion operations and activities across 3 states. Angie has experience in oncology and outpatient infusion service and has managed an IV team, dialysis unit, and outpatient infusion unit. She has served on the INCC RN exam council and on the INS board of directors as a director-at-large. Angie previously served as president of her local INS chapter and was named INS chapter president of the year in 2010. She had presented at numerous conferences, reviewed policy and procedure manuals, and contributed to the revised edition of IV Therapy Made Incredibly Easy. Angie has been a CRNI® since 1999 and an OCN® since 2000

    Kathy Puglise, MSN/ED, BSN, RN, CRNI®

    INCC Chair

    Kathy has been a registered nurse for 34 years. She has clinical experience in emergency room, critical care, and infusion nursing. Kathy has a master of science in nursing with a specialization in health care education. Kathy served as president of the INS Board of Directors from 2012 to 2013. In addition, she was on the INCC RN Council as an expert in question development and evaluation of the CRNI® from 2003 to 2011. She currently serves as the director of nursing for the Specialty Pharmacy Certification Board. Kathy is employed by Smiths Medical on the professional services team as a clinical manager of home infusion and pharmacy services.

    Mary Alexander, MA, RN, CRNI®, CAE, FAAN

    Chief Executive Officer

    Infusion Nurses Society (INS)

    Mary Alexander, MA, RN, CRNI®, CAE, FAAN, has served as CEO of the Infusion Nurses Society (INS) and Infusion Nurses Certification Corporation, since 1997. She is also editor-in-chief of the Journal of Infusion Nursing, the Core Curriculum for Infusion Nursing, and INS’ textbook, Infusion Nursing: An Evidence-Based Approach. In addition, Mary represented INS on the panel that revised the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Guidelines for the Prevention of Intravascular Catheter-Related Infections, in 2011. She speaks globally on topics such as the benefits of the specialty practice of infusion nursing, the development of standards of practice, and improving patient safety.

    One of the most rewarding aspects of INS membership is giving back to the organization and the specialty by serving on the board of directors. By serving, you will have the opportunity to expand your professional network, provide strategic guidance, and be an advocate for the infusion nursing specialty.

    INS board members serve either a two, or three-year term beginning in May. Each year the board meets in person, attends the INS Annual Meeting, and participates in several virtual meetings.

    We will have 3 positions available in 2021:
    President-Elect
    Director at Large
    Secretary Treasurer

    You will find a job-description for each of these positions attached to this email.
    If you are interested in pursuing a position, please submit your application by October 15, 2020.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This session will provide an overview of the professional liability aspects of infusion nursing practice. In this litigious society, it is important for infusion nurses to understand key principles of practice including consent, accountability, confidentiality, negligence, and documentation. A series of case studies will be presented that address common professional liability questions.

    This session will provide an overview of the professional liability aspects of infusion nursing practice. In this litigious society, it is important for infusion nurses to understand key principles of practice including consent, accountability, confidentiality, negligence, and documentation. A series of case studies will be presented that address common professional liability questions.

    Learning Outcomes:

    At the conclusion of this session, attendees will be able to identify at least one practice change related to the professional liability aspects of their practice.

    Jennifer Flynn, CPHRM

    Jennifer Flynn, CPHRM, is Risk Manager in the Healthcare Division of Aon Affinity Insurance Services, Inc. She is dedicated to educating nurses and health care professionals on professional liability risks. Jennifer offers strategies to mitigate risks by supporting patient safety principles and developing quality management programs. She is a frequent national speaker on healthcare risk and liability and is published on various risk management topics. Jennifer is a Certified Professional in Healthcare Risk Management and is a licensed Property & Casualty agent. She earned a BA in Psychology from Arcadia University in Glenside, Pennsylvania.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This session discusses the implementation of a patient classification system at an outpatient infusion center. A task force was formed to research and develop a 5-scale acuity tool to measure patient staffing needs, allocation of financial resources, improve quality of patient care, as well as evaluate nursing performance, satisfaction, and retention. Participants will learn the results of a pilot study, including design aspects, challenges, development of guidelines, and progress to date.

    This session discusses the implementation of a patient classification system at an outpatient infusion center. A task force was formed to research and develop a 5-scale acuity tool to measure patient staffing needs, allocation of financial resources, improve quality of patient care, as well as evaluate nursing performance, satisfaction, and retention. Participants will learn the results of a pilot study, including design aspects, challenges, development of guidelines, and progress to date.

    Learning Outcomes:

    At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to describe a patient acuity classification system and the associated benefits of its implementation in an outpatient infusion center.

    Maggie Perrone, BSN, MA, CRNI®, OCN

    Maggie Perrone, BSN, MA, CRNI®, OCN, holds a Master of Arts Degree in Pastoral Ministry and has been an RN for 36 years. In LA, Maggie helped develop and implement an acuity tool. As an infusion float nurse, now at Michigan Medicine, Maggie identified a need for an appropriate and reliable tool to determine staffing needs based on acuity, chair time and patient care needs. A dynamic speaker, Maggie has developed, created and facilitated many workshops and retreats on coping, stress, PTSD and trauma.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Writing for publication is a responsibility of infusion nurses as a means to disseminate knowledge and advance practice. This presentation will describe the steps on how to write for publication including choosing a topic, selecting a journal, and constructing the manuscript. As predatory journals and predatory conferences continue to permeate the publishing industry, the session will also discuss how to identify these questionable journals and conferences.

    Writing for publication is a responsibility of infusion nurses as a means to disseminate knowledge and advance practice. This presentation will describe the steps on how to write for publication including choosing a topic, selecting a journal, and constructing the manuscript. As predatory journals and predatory conferences continue to permeate the publishing industry, the session will also discuss how to identify these questionable journals and conferences.

    Learning Outcomes:

    At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to describe the steps on writing for publication and identify predatory journals and conferences.

    Cynthia Saver, MS, RN

    Cynthia Saver, MS, RN, is president of CLS Development, which provides editorial services to leading nursing publishing companies; editorial director for American Nurse Today, the official journal of the American Nurses Association; and editor of Anatomy of Writing for Publication for Nurses, 3rd edition. She received her MSN from The Ohio State University. Cynthia, who has more than 30 years of editorial experience, has written for many of the top nursing journals and presents writing for publication workshops.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This session will review the foundational aspects of administering infusion medications— a principle responsibility for infusion nurses. The indications, methods of administration, and side effects of specific medications will be discussed in the categories of anti-infective agents, cardiovascular agents, central nervous system agents, hematologic agents, electrolyte and water balance agents, gastrointestinal agents, hormone and synthetic substitutes, immune modulator agents, and vitamins.

    This session will review the foundational aspects of administering infusion medications— a principle responsibility for infusion nurses. The indications, methods of administration, and side effects of specific medications will be discussed in the categories of anti-infective agents, cardiovascular agents, central nervous system agents, hematologic agents, electrolyte and water balance agents, gastrointestinal agents, hormone and synthetic substitutes, immune modulator agents, and vitamins.

    Learning Outcomes:

    At the conclusion of this session attendees will be able to describe the indications, methods of administration and side effects of specific infusion medications.

    Joan Harvey, DNP, RN-BC, CCRN

    Joan Harvey, DNP, RN, BC, CCRN, has extensive experience in Critical Care Nursing and Gerontology. She is board certified in both and currently sits on a panel for the ANCC as a content expert for the Gerontological exam. She is a Professor at Georgian Court University, teaching Generic BSN students. Her passion for safe medication use dates to when she was at the graduate nurse level. She remains focused on quality education regarding safe medication administration.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Since the first legalization of medical marijuana was approved in California in 1996, more states have implemented medical marijuana programs. This session will provide an overview of federal and state legislation related to medical marijuana or cannabis, including qualifying conditions, therapeutic effects, drug to drug interactions, adverse effects, and signs and symptoms of withdrawal. At the end of the session, nurses will learn practical information and tips in caring for this increasing patient population.

    Since the first legalization of medical marijuana was approved in California in 1996, more states have implemented medical marijuana programs. This session will provide an overview of federal and state legislation related to medical marijuana or cannabis, including qualifying conditions, therapeutic effects, drug to drug interactions, adverse effects, and signs and symptoms of withdrawal. At the end of the session, nurses will learn practical information and tips in caring for this increasing patient population.

    Learning Outcomes:

    At the conclusion of this session, attendees will be able to describe their state’s medical marijuana/cannabis program law(s) and the nursing care of patients who use medical marijuana.

    Kathleen Russell, JD, MN, RN

    Kathleen Russell, JD, MN, RN, is both a lawyer and a nurse. She serves as an Associate Director in the Division of Nursing Regulation for NCSBN. Her professional background includes 40 years of nursing, legal and non-profit leadership experience. Kathleen practiced nursing as a pediatric CNS and nursing educator. In area of law, she was a trial attorney. At NCSBN, she is responsible for investigation and discipline, NPDB reporting, alternative to discipline programs, substance use disorder, licensure fraud and, most recently, cannabis.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    "Mast cells are a significant component of the human immune system. Located in connective tissue and other internal organs, these cells are comprised of granule-filled cells containing histamine, serotonin and proteases. Chemical injury to mast cells is caused by exposure to toxins such as bee venom, and drugs like vancomycin, morphine, barbiturates and muscle relaxants. When stimulated by IgE-mediation, physical, or chemical causes, the result can be allergic/anaphylactic reaction or idiopathic anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reaction. Additionally, physical mast cell stimulation has been hypothesized to be related to clinical events during insertion of PICC and midline catheters. Although the stimulating event for histamine release differs, the clinical presentation is virtually the same. Physical injury to mast cells is associated with catheter advancement techniques, heat, ultraviolet light and radiation. Red man syndrome (RMS) is a common adverse reaction to vancomycin when administered intravenously. This presentation will highlight the causes, management, and prevention of RMS, including mast cells and how they contribute to adverse events during infusion of medications and/or catheter insertion. The session will focus on two different patient cases that resulted in death due to failure to recognize and treat the adverse event."

    Mast cells are a significant component of the human immune system. Located in connective tissue and other internal organs, these cells are comprised of granule-filled cells containing histamine, serotonin and proteases. Chemical injury to mast cells is caused by exposure to toxins such as bee venom, and drugs like vancomycin, morphine, barbiturates and muscle relaxants. When stimulated by IgE-mediation, physical, or chemical causes, the result can be allergic/anaphylactic reaction or idiopathic anaphylactic/anaphylactoid reaction. Additionally, physical mast cell stimulation has been hypothesized to be related to clinical events during insertion of PICC and midline catheters. Although the stimulating event for histamine release differs, the clinical presentation is virtually the same. Physical injury to mast cells is associated with catheter advancement techniques, heat, ultraviolet light and radiation.

    Red man syndrome (RMS) is a common adverse reaction to vancomycin when administered intravenously. This presentation will highlight the causes, management, and prevention of RMS, including mast cells and how they contribute to adverse events during infusion of medications and/or catheter insertion. The session will focus on two different patient cases that resulted in death due to failure to recognize and treat the adverse event.

    Learning Outcomes: 

    At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to describe how to recognize and manage the adverse events associated with histamine release from mast cell stimulation.

    Lynn Hadaway, M.Ed., RN, NPD-BC, CRNI®

    President

    Lynn Hadaway Associates, Inc.

    Lynn Hadaway, M.Ed., RN, NPD-BC, CRNI®, has 50 years’ experience in infusion nursing and adult education. Her clinical experience comes from infusion therapy teams in multiple acute care settings. She is president of Lynn Hadaway Associates, Inc., an education and consulting company started in 1996.

    She holds two national certifications—infusion nursing from the Infusion Nurses Certification Corporation and nursing professional development from the American Nurses Credentialing Center. She also holds a master’s in education from the University of Georgia.

    She has authored more than 70 published articles on infusion therapy and vascular access; written 8 textbook chapters on infusion therapy; and was the clinical editor for the textbook Infusion Therapy Made Incredibly Easy. She served on the Infusion Nurses Society Standards of Practice committees to revise the 2006, 2011, 2016, and 2021 documents. She served on the committees to revise the 2014 and 2022 Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America (SHEA) compendium central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) chapter and the 2015 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC) CLABSI Implementation Guide. She also served as the chair of the INS Infusion Team Task Force and as a chairperson for the board of directors of the Infusion Nurses Certification Corporation, and is currently on the INS Vesicant Task Force.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    The 2021 INS Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice are in progress and will be published in January 2021. The impact of the Standards on infusion therapy practice, both within the United States as well as globally, cannot be underestimated. Changes relative to the development of the Standards included global committee membership, attention to cultural differences, and a concerted effort to involve more reviewers from outside of the US. This presentation will highlight the efforts of the committee and the methodology used in development of this work. While it is beyond the scope of this presentation to provide detail regarding the new Standards, a few key changes, new standards, and new areas of focus will be described.

    The 2021 INS Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice are in progress and will be published in January 2021. The impact of the Standards on infusion therapy practice, both within the United States as well as globally, cannot be underestimated. Changes relative to the development of the Standards included global committee membership, attention to cultural differences, and a concerted effort to involve more reviewers from outside of the US. This presentation will highlight the efforts of the committee and the methodology used in development of this work. While it is beyond the scope of this presentation to provide detail regarding the new Standards, a few key changes, new standards, and new areas of focus will be described.

    Learning Outcomes:

    At the conclusion of this session, participants will be able to describe the scope of the INS Standards and identify expected changes in the 2021 Standards.

    Lisa Gorski, MS, RN, HHCNS-BC, CRNI®, FAAN

    Clinical Education Specialist/Clinical Nurse Specialist

    Ascension at Home – Wisconsin

    Ms. Gorski has worked for more than 30 years as a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) for Wheaton Franciscan Home Health & Hospice which is now Ascension at Home. As a CNS, she developed and continues to provide infusion-related education for home care nurses as well as direct patient care. Ms. Gorski received both her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee College of Nursing. She is the author of several books and more than 70 book chapters and journal articles on home care and infusion therapy topics. She is an INS Past President (2007-2008), past chair for the INCC Board of Directors, and has served as the chair of the INS Standards of Practice Committee since 2011. She was inducted as a fellow into the American Academy of Nursing in 2006, named the 2003 CRNI® of the Year by INCC, and named the 2011 CNS of the Year by the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists. Ms. Gorski speaks nationally and internationally on standards development, infusion therapy/vascular access, and home health care. Over the past few years, she has addressed the Standards in multiple presentations in the US, China, Europe, and several Middle Eastern, African, and Latin American countries. 

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Disasters can strike at any time from natural and man-made situations. Proper emergency preparedness can limit the impact of a disaster on patients and clinical team members. Understanding the components of an effective contingency plan and available resources can help clinicians successfully manage operations during a crisis situation. This interactive session will assess recent disaster scenarios, review successes and failures of organizations’ responses, and discuss steps to develop and implement an effective emergency preparedness plan.

    Disasters can strike at any time from natural and man-made situations. Proper emergency preparedness can limit the impact of a disaster on patients and clinical team members. Understanding the components of an effective contingency plan and available resources can help clinicians successfully manage operations during a crisis situation. This interactive session will assess recent disaster scenarios, review successes and failures of organizations’ responses, and discuss steps to develop and implement an effective emergency preparedness plan.

    Learning Outcomes: 

    At the conclusion of this session, learners will be able to identify common disasters encountered by organizations and patients affecting their care as well as list the components and resources of a comprehensive emergency preparedness plan.

    Brenda Gray, PharmD, VA-BC, BCNSP, CNSC

    Brenda Gray, PharmD, VA-BC, BCNSP, CNSC, owner of Clinical Pharmacy Partners, has 20 years of infusion pharmacy experience with the last 6 as an accreditation surveyor. She is also a long-term infusion patient. Although she has extensive professional experience including multiple association leadership appointments, publications and presentations, Brenda is dedicated to disaster recovery, having worked with rescue squads, state agencies, and FEMA.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Human blood is a complex and specialized body fluid responsible for the transportation of oxygen to the tissues and organs, formation of clots, prevention of infection, removal of waste, and regulation of body temperature. A unit of whole blood collected from a single donor can be broken down into red blood cells, plasma, platelets, and cryoprecipitate. Plasma can then be further broken down into volume expanders, coagulation factor concentrates, and immune globulins. Because of the complexity of blood, several safeguards must be in place to ensure blood is safe for transfusion. ABO typing, Rh typing, and cross matching are critical in the preparation for safe administration of blood products. This session will provide an overview of blood transfusion, proper preparation of donor blood, and other related safe transfusion practice.

    Human blood is a complex and specialized body fluid responsible for the transportation of oxygen to the tissues and organs, formation of clots, prevention of infection, removal of waste, and regulation of body temperature. A unit of whole blood collected from a single donor can be broken down into red blood cells, plasma, platelets, and cryoprecipitate. Plasma can then be further broken down into volume expanders, coagulation factor concentrates, and immune globulins. Because of the complexity of blood, several safeguards must be in place to ensure blood is safe for transfusion. ABO typing, Rh typing, and cross matching are critical in the preparation for safe administration of blood products. This session will provide an overview of blood transfusion, proper preparation of donor blood, and other related safe transfusion practice.

    Learning Outcomes:

    At the conclusion of this session, attendees will describe the process for preparing blood for safe transfusion.

    Julie DeLisle, BSN, MSN, RN

    Transfusion Safety & Blood Management Officer, Versiti Blood Center of WI

    Julie DeLisle, BSN, MSN, RN, is a Transfusion Safety and Blood Management Officer at Versiti Blood Center of WI. She received her Bachelor of Nursing at University of WI Oshkosh and Master of Nursing Education at Cardinal Stritch University. Julie started her career in Oncology. She has published several articles and authored chapters in books. She currently works to ensure that healthcare providers and patients are educated on evidence-based transfusion practice.

To receive contact hours for each educational activity/session, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.