INS 2022 Virtual Conference

INS 2022 Virtual Conference will provide a great alternative for those who are not able to attend the in-person event. Participants will have the ability to attend 15 select sessions virtually and on-demand. This option also enables CRNI®s to earn up to 30 recertification (RU) units. The virtual program will include the 5-hour veINS focus track on Monday, June 6 plus 10 additional one-hour sessions on Sunday, June 5.  

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    Please complete the meeting evaluation to receive your continuing education certificate from the INS Virtual Education Program. Your feedback is important, as it helps INS better serve you and the membership. We need your input to continue to provide you with quality programs. Thank you!

    Please complete the meeting evaluation to receive your continuing education certificate from the INS Virtual Education Program. Your feedback is important, as it helps INS better serve you and the membership. We need your input to continue to provide you with quality programs. Thank you!

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/06/2022

    Cost-Effective Delivery of Infusion Therapy

    “Waste is endemic in health care” was a statement was made by Derek Foley, president and CEO of the Institute for Healthcare Improvement when he put out a call to action to reduce waste in the US health care system. All this waste is leading to a higher cost to deliver care and creating urgency for all health systems to examine this issue. At an 867-bed, level-1 trauma center in Connecticut, one vascular access specialty team (VAST) has been documenting waste reduction. As a result, this VAST has demonstrated cost reductions and is saving bedside staff nurses’ time, resulting in more quality time spent with patients. With these waste reduction initiatives, this VAST has increased their revenue budget by approximately 8 million over the past 2 years and has increased the team size by 67% since 2015. In this presentation, you will be guided through this VAST’s 7-year journey describing all the initiatives that led the growth of this VAST.

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, learners will be able to: 

    • Describe lean thinking and the importance it has in health care in reducing waste and nonvalue added activities
    • Explore all the ways a VAST can show support of key hospital objectives through the care they provide, using lean thinking to drive and sustain their improvement initiatives
    • Explain how a VAST can collect and use data to assure they are viewed as a value-added entity to their health care institution

    ​Lee Steere

    Lee Steere has been leading the vascular access team at Hartford Hospital for 18 years, and has past experience in critical care and hyperbaric medicine. Under his leadership, during the past 5 years, Mr. Steere has tripled the size of his team while conducting clinical studies on peripheral intravenous catheters. He is a member of the hospital-acquired infection committee and is cochair of Hartford Healthcare’s Patient Care Clinical Value Team. Mr. Steere is well-known in the vascular access community through his presentations on multiple local and national infusion/vascular access conferences on central line-associated bloodstream prevention and central vascular access device occlusion management. At the 2019 Association for Vascular Access National Conference, Lee presented his team’s research on peripheral intravenous catheter insertions using a vascular access nurse and a bundled approach. The results of this study supported the expansion of the vascular access team with an increase in departmental responsibilities. Lee has also authored 3 peer reviewed articles on vascular access topics.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/06/2022

    Don’t Wait for a Mandate for PIVC Infection Surveillance

    Hospitals have been collecting data on central line associated complications, most notably central line associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI) for many years; however, many do not include PIVC infection surveillance in their scope. Although not yet mandated in the United States at the federal level, clinicians are encouraged to review strategies for collecting and reporting this data to help drive progress in improving safety across all vascular access and infusion activities to enhance vessel health and preservation. In this session, we will review the current literature on PIVC-related infections and complications, discuss strategies for conducting surveillance, and explain how to use of the data to improve patient outcomes.

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, learners will be able to: 

    ·      Describe the current literature on PIVC-related infections and other complications

    ·      Discuss strategies for conducting surveillance on PIVC infections

    ·      Explain how to use the surveillance data to advocate for your patients

    Chelle DeVries

    Chellie DeVries has been involved in infection prevention and hospital epidemiology for more than 25 years, spanning community, university and federal health care facilities. She is particularly passionate about raising awareness around peripheral vascular access devices and devotes her time to education on this topic throughout the United States and internationally. She was a reviewer for the 2016 and 2021 INS Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice, is serving on the 2024 Standards of Practice Committee, and has authored several textbook chapters as well as numerous peer-reviewed journal articles. She is an adjunct research fellow with AVATAR and serves as the secretary for the Association for Vascular Access (AVA).

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/06/2022

    Expert VAD Assessment and Management

    Because of the invasive nature and the pervasive use of vascular access devices (VADs) in all health care settings, use of expert assessment skills throughout the life of each VAD is crucial to enhance patient safety and optimize VAD function. Knowledge of VAD-related complications and associated risk factors is essential to ensure proper VAD function and to mitigate potential patient harm through early recognition. Once a particular VAD is selected and successfully placed, continued assessment based on VAD, on the patient, and on infusate risks is crucial. This talk will review VAD-related complications and related global VAD assessment parameters that are utilized to optimize patient outcomes. These concepts will then be applied to the proper assessment and management of peripheral and central VADs in a variety of clinical settings.

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, learners will be able to:

    · Describe global VAD assessment parameters that will enhance optimal VAD function and early recognition of complications

    · Discuss utilization of patient and infusate-based assessment parameters to improve peripheral IV management

    · Relate the use of device-specific CVAD assessment criteria to optimal device performance and positive patient outcomes

    Barb Nickel

    Barb Nickel is a clinical nurse specialist specializing in critical care and vascular access. Her role includes staff development, quality improvement, and clinical consultation. She had published numerous articles on infusion therapy and is chair of the 2022-2024 Infusion Nurses Society Standards of Practice Committee.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/06/2022

    With the rapid expansion of an ultrasound to guide vein cannulation, first-time access success rates have improved. However, this has also led to some problematic peripheral vascular access device placements. Due to the invasiveness of the procedure and the risks associated with it, adherence to a systematic process on all cannulation under ultrasound guidance is optimal to promote the success of device utilization and the health of the vein. Proper sequence, prompt assessment, and ongoing evaluation ensure the enhancement of patient satisfaction, reduce risks, and deliver quality of care. Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, learners will be able to: 1. Describe clinical assessment parameters for the difficult intravenous access patient and probe technique that maximizes acoustic return improving visualization 2. Explain how rounding on all vascular access devices (VAD) has reduced our incidence for complications as it relates to the appropriate device 3. Verbalize common problems associated with ultrasound-guided peripheral intravenous catheter and midline insertions 4. Discuss how disseminating the standards of practice with proper technique and VAD knowledge contributes to better outcomes

    With the rapid expansion of an ultrasound to guide vein cannulation, first-time access success rates have improved. However, this has also led to some problematic peripheral vascular access device placements. Due to the invasiveness of the procedure and the risks associated with it, adherence to a systematic process on all cannulation under ultrasound guidance is optimal to promote the success of device utilization and the health of the vein. Proper sequence, prompt assessment, and ongoing evaluation ensure the enhancement of patient satisfaction, reduce risks, and deliver quality of care. 

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, learners will be able to: 

    1.     Describe clinical assessment parameters for the difficult intravenous access patient and probe technique that maximizes acoustic return improving visualization

    2.     Explain how rounding on all vascular access devices (VAD) has reduced our incidence for complications as it relates to the appropriate device

    3.     Verbalize common problems associated with ultrasound-guided peripheral intravenous catheter and midline insertions 

    4.     Discuss how disseminating the standards of practice with proper technique and VAD knowledge contributes to better outcomes

    ​Joseph Bunch

    Joseph Bunch has been a noteworthy leader, CEO, and business owner for many years. He currently works at ProVasc Solutions LTD, a Chicagoland based vascular access group and the area’s only complete vascular access solution. Responsible for the strategic direction, vision, and clinical performance of his group, Joseph maximizes operational excellence within some of the region’s leading health care institutional networks. His focus and leadership have expanded beyond the boundaries of traditional industry standard with initiatives that have a lasting impact on patient care.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/06/2022

    One Goal, One Vessel, One Cannulation, One VAD

    Establishing a goal of one vessel, one catheter to complete the prescribed therapy requires careful assessment, careful selection, and proficient insertion of the most appropriate catheter size and length. Technology used with catheter materials, needleless connectors, and management practices can extend or limit catheter life, and consideration of a hemodilution ratio, as outlined by Roethlisberger, may help to evaluate the optimal location for catheter insertion and infusion of the treatment plan designed to achieve the one goal. In this session, we will discuss characteristics of optimal vein selection incorporating the INS Standards regarding insertion and vein visualization; consider VAD technology and management practices; and explore the impact of hemodilution upon one cannulation, one vessel, one VAD.

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, learners will be able to: 

    ·      Explore the characteristics of optimal vein selection including quantitative assessment of size, flow, and valve locations

    ·      Discuss INS Standards and evidence for selection and recommended forearm placement for peripheral intravenous catheters

    ·      Explain the 4Vs of hemodilution and the 3:1 ratio to achieve one vessel, one cannulation, one VAD

    Nancy Moureau

    Nancy Moureau is an internationally recognized speaker and expert in the field of vascular access practice. A nurse for more than 40 years, Dr. Moureau works as a home infusion nurse and is the owner and CEO of PICC Excellence, a company that provides online education for clinicians. A researcher and well-published author, she has received numerous awards and holds certifications in the specialty area of vascular access.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/05/2022

    Advances in Blood Culture Practice with Antimicrobial Stewardship

    Reducing contamination incidence in blood culture, an immediate health care priority, is solvable with available techniques and technology. While nearly all patients with suspected bloodstream infection have blood cultured, contamination is substantially more prevalent in communities without access to dedicated (and expensive) phlebotomy teams and is thus substantially more costly to communities with fewer personnel and financing resources. Antibiotic resistance is a global concern and antimicrobial stewardship must be a global initiative with proactive investments. To illustrate with a practice-pertinent example, in patient safety we invoke the current state of blood culture, where contamination may be eliminated with the adoption of cost-saving techniques and technology, but a lack of awareness and outdated standards have impeded uptake. This session will provide nurses with knowledge on specific guidelines and interventions to reduce specimen contamination during blood culture procedure.

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, learners will be able to: 

    1.     Recognize that outdated blood culture practice standards have led to negative local and global consequences for patient safety, health care equity, and antimicrobial stewardship

    2.     Describe how modern tools and techniques can circumvent the collapse of blood culture protocol that frequently occurs in the presence of environmental stressors associated with nursing

    3.     Explain strategies to meet blood culture practice targets that sustainably exceed both established and anticipated quality standards

    Tammy Johnson

    Tammy Johnson has worked as a nurse for over 30 years. Starting with bedside nursing, she transitioned into patient quality and safety, working with smart pump technology, CLABSI prevention, and diagnostic safety and stewardship. With over 20 years as a nurse leader and an executive, Tammy’s focus remains on changing the standard of care to prevent patient harm and the misspending of health care monies. Tammy holds degrees in nursing, business, and health care management.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/05/2022

    Early Recognition and Management of Sepsis: 2022 Update

    Sepsis is a life-threatening condition which requires immediate intervention. If not promptly treated, patients with sepsis can experience shock, organ failure, or even death. Whether sepsis is identified in the community or in acute care, decreasing the time in which the patient with sepsis obtains necessarily treatment is critical. In this session, we will discuss sepsis assessment tools, the most recent sepsis related guidance, and initiatives and community awareness education.

     Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, learners will be able to: 

    1.     Describe sepsis condition, existing tools, and criteria related to the hospital admission of a sepsis suspected patient

    2.     Discuss effectiveness of monitoring and preventing measures within hospitals according to new sepsis guidelines

    3.      Explain the importance community awareness education

    Kathleen Vollman

    Kathleen Vollman is a critical care clinical nurse specialist and consultant. She has published and lectured nationally and internationally on a variety of pulmonary, critical care, and prevention of health care acquired injuries including pressure injury and CAUTI/CALBSIs, work culture, and sepsis recognition, and management. She serves as a subject matter expert on these topics for the American Hospital Association and Michigan Hospital Association. From 1989 to 2003 she functioned in the role of a clinical nurse specialist for the medical ICUs at Henry Ford Hospital in Detroit, Michigan. Currently her company, Advancing Nursing, LLC, is focused on creating empowered work environments for health care practitioners through the acquisition of better skills, attainment of greater knowledge, and implementation of process improvement. Notable inductions and appointments include College of Critical Care Medicine (2004), American Academy of Nurses (2009), and CNS Institute (2019). She was appointed to serve as an honorary ambassador to the World Federation of Critical Care Nurses and is currently the financial director of that organization (2012-present).

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/05/2022

    Iron Deficiency in the Bariatric Patient

    The prevalence of obesity has risen exponentially over the past several decades, also leading to a significant rise in the number of bariatric procedures performed for weight loss and comorbidity abatement. The association between obesity and iron deficiency, as well as iron deficiency as a long-term effect of bariatric procedures, is just now being fully appreciated, which is leading to a rapid increase in the use of intravenous iron. Best patient outcomes result when the infusion nurse is knowledgeable about the etiology behind the treatment and the safety issues related to iron infusion therapy. This session will describe the relationship between obesity and iron deficiency, explain the ways in which bariatric procedures cause iron deficiency, and provide guidance for the safe provision of intravenous iron infusions to this patient population. 

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, learners will be able to:

    1.     Discuss the relationship between obesity and iron deficiency

    2.     Explain three bariatric surgical procedures that can result in iron deficiency

    3.     Assess a patient for 3 symptoms of iron deficiency anemia

    4.     Recognize the indications for intravenous iron replacement Describe at least two potential complications of iron administration and appropriate interventions

    ​Pamela Clark

    Pamela Clark has been a practicing nurse for 46 years, 38 of which have been in the specialty of infusion nursing. She has been employed in various settings including acute care, home infusion, oncology research, skilled nursing facility support, physician office-based infusion clinics, and outpatient infusion clinics. She has authored numerous online continuing education courses on infusion related topics including iron deficiency. In her current position in a community hospital outpatient infusion clinic, she provides many intravenous iron infusions, leading to an interest in the various etiologies of this condition and the safe administration of the various available parenteral iron preparations.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/05/2022

    Optimizing the Effectiveness of Peripheral Intravenous Catheters (PIVCs)

    Hospitalized adult patients often require more than 1 PIVC to complete the prescribed intravenous (IV) therapy due to catheter failure and the practice of routinely replacing PIVCs. The purpose of this quality improvement project was to increase the number of PIVCs dwelling for the entire duration of the IV therapy in hospitalized adult patients using a bundled approach. In order to reduce the number of PIVC insertions and catheter failures, clinicians implemented an engineered securement device, educated staff pertaining to modifiable risk factors, and changed the practice to remove PIVCs upon clinical indication. This session will allow the learner to identify methods to safely increase the dwell time for PIVCs.

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, learners will be able to:

    1.     Identify two interventions utilized to reduce the number of PIVCs per patient

    2.     Summarize the cumulative outcomes of the interventions including reducing the number of PIVCs per patient, catheter failures, central line bloodstream infection (CLABSI) rates, cost savings, and location and gauge risk of failure

    3.     List two change management methods utilized to implement the quality improvement initiative at the rural hospital

    Carrie Kollar

    Carrie Kollar is the practice transformation director of Ascension in St. Louis, Missouri. She is a registered nurse with over 20 years of health care experience primarily focused in leadership, vascular access, quality improvement, critical care, and education spanning the community, hospital, and long- term care. Dr. Kollar is a highly motivated, innovative, and detail-oriented team leader producing improved patient care outcomes and cost savings. She shares her passion, support, and experience as a mentor in the American Nurses Association Mentoring Program. She has served as the INS St. Louis Gateway chapter board treasurer for the past 2 years. Dr. Kollar’s presentation is a result of a project completed at Mercy Washington while she was pursuing her DNP degree.