Of the 40 recertification units (RUs) required for a CRNI® to recertify, at least 30 RUs must be obtained by attending any INS Meeting (live or online). Up to 10 RUs may be earned from the non INS Meeting category. The learning assets in this section have all been approved for RUs. Virtual Meetings and Conference Learning meet the INS Meeting criteria. Webinars meet the non INS Meeting criteria. All webinars are free to INS members.

CRNI® Recertification Approved

  • Prevention and Early Recognition of Infiltration and Extravasation

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 04/14/2021

    Infiltration and extravasation are inherent risks of IV therapy. Knowing how and why infiltration and extravasation may occur helps clinicians understand the practice standards for safe IV therapy. This webinar is the first of a two-part presentation. During this session, we will learn how implementing the 2021 INS Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice can maximize prevention of these iatrogenic injuries and facilitate prompt recognition for best treatment outcomes.

    Infiltration and extravasation are inherent risks of IV therapy. Knowing how and why infiltration and extravasation may occur helps clinicians understand the practice standards for safe IV therapy. This webinar is the first of a two-part presentation. During this session, we will learn how implementing the 2021 INS Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice can maximize prevention of these iatrogenic injuries and facilitate prompt recognition for best treatment outcomes.

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this webinar, learners will be able to: 

    1. Distinguish between infiltration and extravasation and describe how infiltrations/extravasations occur
    2. Identify risk factors and methods of preventing infiltration/extravasation
    3. Discuss barriers to prompt and appropriate treatment of infiltration/extravasation
    4. Select and apply an appropriate staging tool for extravasation symptoms


    Jennie Ong, PharmD

    Clinical Pharmacist

    Bryan Medical Center

    Dr. Jennie Ong has been a clinical pharmacist at Bryan Medical Center in Lincoln Nebraska for 10 years. As a result of 4 years of extensive research, Dr. Ong, along with co-author Ruth Van Gerpen, recently published "Recommendations for Management of Noncytotoxic Vesicant Extravasations". This is the first set of treatment recommendations based not only on extravasation principles but also on available published evidence. It was cited in the 2021 Infusion Nursing Society Standards of Practice.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: April 14, 2024

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Risk factors and characteristics of short peripheral intravenous catheter (PIVC) failure: Improving Patient Outcomes

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 03/24/2021

    Short peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) are a ubiquitous and necessary invasive clinical device. Although patient need for short PIVCs is high, one in three catheters will fail before the completion of treatment. To improve insertion and post insertion care, and reduce complications, there is an urgent need for substantial and interdisciplinary interventions. This presentation will provide an overview of recent short PIVC research, including a large systematic review of non-infectious complications for 76,997 short PIVCs; and a multivariate analysis of 12 studies (11,830 PIVCs) identifying patient, catheter and provider risk factors associated with failure.

    Short peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) are a ubiquitous and necessary invasive clinical device. Although patient need for short PIVCs is high, one in three catheters will fail before the completion of treatment. To improve insertion and post insertion care, and reduce complications, there is an urgent need for substantial and interdisciplinary interventions.

    This presentation will provide an overview of recent short PIVC research, including a large systematic review of non-infectious complications for 76,997 short PIVCs; and a multivariate analysis of 12 studies (11,830 PIVCs) identifying patient, catheter and provider risk factors associated with failure. 

    Learning Objectives:

    At the conclusion of this webinar, the participants will be able to:

    1. Describe non-infectious complications of short PIVCs (occlusions, dislodgement, leakage, and/or mechanical phlebitis).

    2. Understand the global impact of short PIVC complications and failure.

    3. Explain how understanding patient, catheter and provider risk factors can optimize short PIVC survival.  

    Dr Nicole Marsh, RN, MAdvPrac (healthcare research), PhD

    Clinical Trial Director for the Alliance for Vascular Access Teaching and Research

    Alliance for Vascular Access Teaching and Research (AVATAR)

    Dr Nicole Marsh’s research is focused on improving patient outcomes and decreasing complications associated with vascular access across the acute clinical care and community settings. She is the Nursing and Midwifery Director of Research at the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital and the Clinical Trial Director for the Alliance for Vascular Access Teaching and Research (AVATAR; https://www.avatargroup.org.au/). In addition, she has been a Clinical Trial Coordinator for more than 30 single and multi-center vascular access clinical trials. Dr. Marsh has over 25 years of experience in acute care nursing.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: March 24, 2024

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Point-of-Care Ultrasound to Identify Landmarks of the Proximal Humerus for Potential Use in Intraosseous Vascular Access: An Educational Journey to Improve Clinical Care

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 02/25/2021

    Establishing vascular access is of vital importance during resuscitation in cases of cardiac arrest. When obtaining peripheral or central intravenous access is difficult or impossible, intraosseous (IO) access is an alternative route for immediate fluid and medication delivery. The proximal humerus is one of the anatomic sites available for IO access, but the inability to identify its landmarks by palpation is considered an absolute contraindication for this procedure. During this webinar, our presenter will describe his educational journey that led to the initial descriptions of point-of-care ultrasonography to improve landmark identification of the proximal humerus and its potential use for intraosseous vascular access.

    Establishing vascular access is of vital importance during resuscitation in cases of cardiac arrest. When obtaining peripheral or central intravenous access is difficult or impossible, intraosseous (IO) access is an alternative route for immediate fluid and medication delivery. The proximal humerus is one of the anatomic sites available for IO access, but the inability to identify its landmarks by palpation is considered an absolute contraindication for this procedure.

    During this webinar, our presenter will describe his educational journey that led to the initial descriptions of point-of-care ultrasonography to improve landmark identification of the proximal humerus and its potential use for intraosseous vascular access.

    Learning Objectives:

    At the conclusion of this webinar, the participants will be able to:

    1. Recognize the importance of intraosseous (IO) access as an effective route to the intravascular space.

    2. Compare and contrast the landmark identification techniques of the proximal humerus by palpation vs. ultrasound.

    3. Recognize the value of deliberate practice and mastery learning principles for task-training acquisition.

    4. Describe the essential components of a curriculum-based simulation training program to improve competencies in IO access.

    Sergio Bustamante, MD, CHSE

    Anesthesiologist

    Department of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia at Cleveland Clinic

    Dr. Sergio Bustamante is a staff anesthesiologist in the Department of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia at Cleveland Clinic. He is the medical director of the Department's simulation laboratory and core faculty of the Simulation Center. Dr. Bustamante is also a clinical assistant professor at Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University and current Section Chair of Anesthesia at the Society for Simulation in Healthcare. He has a strong interest in healthcare education, task-training modalities, high-fidelity simulation, and debriefing.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: February 25, 2024

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Resetting the Standards: Examining the 2021 Changes Virtual Conference

    Contains 8 Product(s)

    The Standards of Practice committee will explore some of the changes that can be found in the newest edition of the Standards. During each day, there will be an opportunity for attendees to engage with members of the committee to ask clarifying questions and to discuss how these changes will impact clinical practice. At the conclusion of the meeting you will be able to claim contact hours and CRNI® recertification units.

    The Standards of Practice committee will explore some of the changes that can be found in the newest edition of the Standards. During each day, there will be an opportunity for attendees to engage with members of the committee to ask clarifying questions and to discuss how these changes will impact clinical practice. At the conclusion of the meeting you will be able to claim contact hours and CRNI® recertification units. 

  • Vesicant Identification and Appropriate Extravasation and Infiltration Treatment

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 01/27/2021

    Infiltration and extravasation will sometimes occur, despite best efforts in prevention. Overcoming barriers to prompt and appropriate treatment requires identification of vesicants and treatment options. This webinar is the second in a two-part presentation. During this session, we will learn about the evidence and principles guiding use of temperature therapy, antidote administration or use of an enzyme dispersal agent, along with other supportive therapies, that will facilitate appropriate treatment selection.

    Infiltration and extravasation will sometimes occur, despite best efforts in prevention. Overcoming barriers to prompt and appropriate treatment requires identification of vesicants and treatment options. This webinar is the second in a two-part presentation. During this session, we will learn about the evidence and principles guiding use of temperature therapy, antidote administration or use of an enzyme dispersal agent, along with other supportive therapies, that will facilitate appropriate treatment selection.

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this webinar, learners will be able to: 

    1. Discuss barriers to prompt and appropriate treatment of extravasation
    2. Describe the relationship between mechanism of tissue injury, the vesicant, and appropriate antidote (s)/treatment strategies
    3. Identify alternative/adjunctive therapies for extravasation treatment
    4. Recognize surgical removal techniques and indications


    Jennie Ong, PharmD

    Clinical Pharmacist

    Bryan Medical Center

    Dr. Jennie Ong has been a clinical pharmacist at Bryan Medical Center in Lincoln Nebraska for 10 years. As a result of 4 years of extensive research, Dr. Ong, along with co-author Ruth Van Gerpen, recently published "Recommendations for Management of Noncytotoxic Vesicant Extravasations". This is the first set of treatment recommendations based not only on extravasation principles but also on available published evidence. It was cited in the 2021 Infusion Nursing Society Standards of Practice.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: May 5, 2024

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Perceptions of Adult Hospitalized Patients with Difficult Venous Access Experiencing Short Peripheral Catheter Insertion: An Opportunity for Clinicians to Improve Patients’ Experiences

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 01/27/2021

    Hospitalized patients require venous access for procedures, treatments, or therapies. The short peripheral catheter (SPC) is one option for patients who need intravenous (IV) access. Patients with difficult vasculature sometimes require multiple attempts to obtain SPC access. This session will explore the perceptions and experiences of patients with difficult access, requiring multiple attempts to obtain SPC access. Ways clinicians can improve the patient’s experience will also be discussed.

    Hospitalized patients require venous access for procedures, treatments, or therapies. The short peripheral catheter (SPC) is one option for patients who need intravenous (IV) access. Patients with difficult vasculature sometimes require multiple attempts to obtain SPC access. This session will explore the perceptions and experiences of patients with difficult access, requiring multiple attempts to obtain SPC access. Ways clinicians can improve the patient’s experience will also be discussed. 

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this webinar, learners will be able to: 

    a) describe the physical and emotional impact the SPC insertion may have on a patient with difficult venous access and

    b) identify at least three measures to improve the experience of the patient with difficult access.

    Ann Plohal, PhD, RN, ACNS-BC, CRNI®, VA-BC

    Vascular Access Team

    St. Joseph Hospital Medical Center

    Dr. Ann Plohal received her PhD in 2015. She wrote her dissertation on the patient perception of short peripheral catheter insertion for patients with difficult access. Ann is past president of the Infusion Nurses Society. She has published multiple articles regarding infusion therapy and is an active infusion and vascular access nurse.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: January 27, 2024

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Risk factors for peripheral intravenous catheter failure in the care of patients with cancer: How can we improve care?

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 12/16/2020

    The purpose of this presentation will be to share results of a prospective observational study and a cancer-specific sub-analysis of a large international cross—sectional study, to explore both modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors for PIVC failure among hematology and oncology patients.

    Background and Objective:

    Peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) are regularly used to administer intravenous infusates, including blood, chemotherapy, fluids, and supportive care drugs, in the treatment of cancer.

    The purpose of this presentation will be to share results of a prospective observational study and a cancer-specific sub-analysis of a large international cross—sectional study, to explore both modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors for PIVC failure among hematology and oncology patients.

    Methods:

    During the observational study, two hundred adult patients requiring a PIVC upon admission to a tertiary hospital in Queensland, Australia, were prospectively followed from admission through discharge. Each PIVC the patient received was followed and documented to understand how risk factors, both modifiable (e.g. PIVC gauge) and nonmodifiable (e.g. patient age), impacted upon all-cause PIVC failure. Following this, an oncology/hematology sub-analysis of a large international cross-sectional study was conducted, including n=1807 adult participants from 24 countries. During this study, participants were assessed once for PIVC characteristics and the presence of complications.

    Results:

    The cross-sectional survey identified several modifiable risk factors for complications, including insertion by medical physicians (compared with nurse and vascular access teams), insertion in emergency settings, poor PIVC dressing integrity, and dwell time ≥49 hours. Treatment risk factors included administration of intravenous colloids/blood products and antiemetics. The observational cohort study identified a single protective factor against PIVC dislodgement – the use of non-sterile tape (external to the primary dressing).

    Conclusion:

    The rate of all-cause PIVC failure in cancer settings remains high. It is important that clinicians and researchers understand both modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors in order to inform quality improvement and future large interventional research studies.

     

    Learning objectives:

    1.     Recognize what modifiable risk factors are associated with PIVC failure in Oncology and Hematology settings, and ways to mitigate them.

    2.     Describe the impact of non-modifiable (inherent) risk factors (such as age and gender) upon PIVC failure, and how this should influence device, vein, location, and dressing selection.

    3.     Understand how PIVC characteristics vary internationally and consider how to place these results in the context of your own clinical setting.

    ​Emily Larsen

    Research Fellow, Vascular Access

    Emily Larsen is a Research Fellow, Vascular Access, with positions at the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital and Griffith University in Australia. In her various roles with the Alliance for Vascular Access Teaching and Research (AVATAR), Ms. Larsen has coordinated over 30 single and multi-centre clinical trials, cohort studies and qualitative inquiries over the last 8 years. Her interests and expertise include patient experience of IV access and vascular access devices in oncology and hematology, as well as the classification and prevention of catheter-associated bloodstream infections.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: December 16, 2023

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Improving Vascular Access and Care with Near Infrared (NIR) Technology

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 10/21/2020

    Peripheral venous access is an essential part of modern in-patient medical care that is poorly managed and has a high rate of failure. Patients and clinicians are frustrated because they wish it could be done better. Old fashioned concepts and inadequate attention to developing best practices has led to the creation of an epidemic of difficult vascular access patients. Our knowledge and experience are growing and with the help of vein visualization technology, we are at a turning point to help reduce the number of venipuncture attempts and better preserve veins. Near Infrared (NIR) technology is well suited to help us implement these best practices. It provides a rapid means to assess a patient’s venous options, identifies potential venous targets, and helps optimize catheter position. It has also been proven to reduce venipuncture attempts, improve first attempt success and prolong dwell times. It thus helps improve efficiency and reduce overall costs both materially and nursing time. NIR can also reduce the need for central venous access by providing more venous options, thus reducing the risk of CLABSI. NIR is an incredibly important tool for our approach to modern venous access best practice.

    Commercial Support: AccuVein

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    Peripheral venous access is an essential part of modern in-patient medical care that is poorly managed and has a high rate of failure.  Patients and clinicians are frustrated because they wish it could be done better.  Old fashioned concepts and inadequate attention to developing best practices has led to the creation of an epidemic of difficult vascular access patients.  Our knowledge and experience are growing and with the help of vein visualization technology, we are at a turning point to help reduce the number of venipuncture attempts and better preserve veins.  Near Infrared (NIR) technology is well suited to help us implement these best practices.  It provides a rapid means to assess a patient’s venous options, identifies potential venous targets, and helps optimize catheter position.  It has also been proven to reduce venipuncture attempts, improve first attempt success and prolong dwell times.  It thus helps improve efficiency and reduce overall costs both materially and nursing time.  NIR can also reduce the need for central venous access by providing more venous options, thus reducing the risk of CLABSI.  NIR is an incredibly important tool for our approach to modern venous access best practice.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Identify the problems associated with our current approach to peripheral venous access and how it leads to pain, frustration and the creation of difficult vascular access (DVA) patients
    • Review best practice concepts of optimal site selection and reduced venipunctures to support vein preservation and improved vein health
    • Discuss how NIR technology supports peripheral access best practice in multiple ways and how it directly helps support prolonging dwell times, vein preservation and improve patient care


    Gregory Schears, MD

    Mayo Clinic

    Dr. Gregory J. Schears, M.D. is a Professor of Anesthesiology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN.  He is a pediatric intensivist and anesthesiologist by training and cares for both adult and pediatric patients in his practice. He has a long standing interest in reducing patient complications and improving our approach to vascular access and patient safety. Dr. Schears completed his pediatric residency at St. Louis Children's Hospital, his anesthesia residency, pediatric anesthesia fellowship and pediatric critical care fellowship at John's Hopkins hospital, and worked at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia/ Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania for 5 years until he was recruited to the Mayo Clinic in 2001 to head the ECMO service. There he serves as Consultant in Department of Anesthesiology at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota and is the physician liaison to the nurse led PICC team, former Medical Director of the ECMO Service for 16 years and Co-Director of the Congenital Heart Unit.  He has served on the editorial board for JAVA and on the AVA Board of Directors as Treasurer. He is also joining the AVA Patient Safety Foundation board this year.  He is very active with product development to help reduce complications and has given hundreds of presentations locally, regionally, nationally and internationally.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: October 21, 2023

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Types and Uses of Various SARS-CoV-19 Tests

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 10/07/2020

    The novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-19) was first identified in Wuhan, China in December 2019. Since that time, it has rapidly spread across the globe. To help combat the epidemic, multiple testing techniques have been developed. Such technologies include molecular and diagnostic assays which detect active infection as well as antibody tests that may identify if a person has been previously exposed to the virus. In this webinar the process and science of the various testing strategies will be discussed as well as a look toward future testing techniques.

    The novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-19) was first identified in Wuhan, China in December 2019. Since that time, it has rapidly spread across the globe.  To help combat the epidemic, multiple testing techniques have been developed.  Such technologies include molecular and diagnostic assays which detect active infection as well as antibody tests that may identify if a person has been previously exposed to the virus.  In this webinar the process and science of the various testing strategies will be discussed as well as a look toward future testing techniques.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Differentiate between diagnostic and antibody tests for SARS-CoV-19.
    • Describe the differences, pros, and cons between a nucleic acid and antigen diagnostic test.
    • Given a patient case, identify the best SARS-CoV-19 test to use.

    Stephanie James, PhD, MBA

    Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Science, Regis University School of Pharmacy

    Dr. Stephanie James is an Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Science in the Regis University School of Pharmacy, where she teaches the immunology and infectious disease units.  She is also the current laboratory director of the Regis University Pharmacy testing lab where she processes and tests patient samples for coronavirus.  Dr. James earned her PhD in Biological Education from the University of Northern Colorado and completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: October 7, 2023

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • INS 2020 Virtual Conference Recordings Package

    Contains 31 Product(s)

    INS 2020 Virtual will come directly to you, in the comfort of your own home or office! Here you have the ability to view all 30 sessions at your convenience. The entire program has been approved for 30 Contact Hours and 60 CRNI® RUs and meetings the INS meetings criteria.​

    INS 2020 Virtual will come directly to you, in the comfort of your own home or office! Here you have the ability to view all 30 sessions at your convenience. The entire program has been approved for 30 Contact Hours and 60 CRNI® RUs and meetings the INS meetings criteria.

    To receive contact hours for each educational activity/session, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.