Of the 40 recertification units (RUs) required for a CRNI® to recertify, at least 30 RUs must be obtained by attending any INS Meeting (live or online). Up to 10 RUs may be earned from the non INS Meeting category. The learning assets in this section have all been approved for RUs. Virtual Meetings and Conference Learning meet the INS Meeting criteria. Webinars meet the non INS Meeting criteria. All webinars are free to INS members.

CRNI® Recertification Approved

  • Risk factors for peripheral intravenous catheter failure in the care of patients with cancer: How can we improve care?

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 12/16/2020 at 1:00 PM (EST)

    The purpose of this presentation will be to share results of a prospective observational study and a cancer-specific sub-analysis of a large international cross—sectional study, to explore both modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors for PIVC failure among hematology and oncology patients.

    Background and Objective:

    Peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) are regularly used to administer intravenous infusates, including blood, chemotherapy, fluids, and supportive care drugs, in the treatment of cancer.

    The purpose of this presentation will be to share results of a prospective observational study and a cancer-specific sub-analysis of a large international cross—sectional study, to explore both modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors for PIVC failure among hematology and oncology patients.

    Methods:

    During the observational study, two hundred adult patients requiring a PIVC upon admission to a tertiary hospital in Queensland, Australia, were prospectively followed from admission through discharge. Each PIVC the patient received was followed and documented to understand how risk factors, both modifiable (e.g. PIVC gauge) and nonmodifiable (e.g. patient age), impacted upon all-cause PIVC failure. Following this, an oncology/hematology sub-analysis of a large international cross-sectional study was conducted, including n=1807 adult participants from 24 countries. During this study, participants were assessed once for PIVC characteristics and the presence of complications.

    Results:

    The cross-sectional survey identified several modifiable risk factors for complications, including insertion by medical physicians (compared with nurse and vascular access teams), insertion in emergency settings, poor PIVC dressing integrity, and dwell time ≥49 hours. Treatment risk factors included administration of intravenous colloids/blood products and antiemetics. The observational cohort study identified a single protective factor against PIVC dislodgement – the use of non-sterile tape (external to the primary dressing).

    Conclusion:

    The rate of all-cause PIVC failure in cancer settings remains high. It is important that clinicians and researchers understand both modifiable and non-modifiable risk factors in order to inform quality improvement and future large interventional research studies.

     

    Learning objectives:

    1.     Recognize what modifiable risk factors are associated with PIVC failure in Oncology and Hematology settings, and ways to mitigate them.

    2.     Describe the impact of non-modifiable (inherent) risk factors (such as age and gender) upon PIVC failure, and how this should influence device, vein, location, and dressing selection.

    3.     Understand how PIVC characteristics vary internationally and consider how to place these results in the context of your own clinical setting.

    ​Emily Larsen

    Research Fellow, Vascular Access

    Emily Larsen is a Research Fellow, Vascular Access, with positions at the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital and Griffith University in Australia. In her various roles with the Alliance for Vascular Access Teaching and Research (AVATAR), Ms. Larsen has coordinated over 30 single and multi-centre clinical trials, cohort studies and qualitative inquiries over the last 8 years. Her interests and expertise include patient experience of IV access and vascular access devices in oncology and hematology, as well as the classification and prevention of catheter-associated bloodstream infections.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: December 16, 2023

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Improving Vascular Access and Care with Near Infrared (NIR) Technology

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 10/21/2020

    Peripheral venous access is an essential part of modern in-patient medical care that is poorly managed and has a high rate of failure. Patients and clinicians are frustrated because they wish it could be done better. Old fashioned concepts and inadequate attention to developing best practices has led to the creation of an epidemic of difficult vascular access patients. Our knowledge and experience are growing and with the help of vein visualization technology, we are at a turning point to help reduce the number of venipuncture attempts and better preserve veins. Near Infrared (NIR) technology is well suited to help us implement these best practices. It provides a rapid means to assess a patient’s venous options, identifies potential venous targets, and helps optimize catheter position. It has also been proven to reduce venipuncture attempts, improve first attempt success and prolong dwell times. It thus helps improve efficiency and reduce overall costs both materially and nursing time. NIR can also reduce the need for central venous access by providing more venous options, thus reducing the risk of CLABSI. NIR is an incredibly important tool for our approach to modern venous access best practice.

    Commercial Support: AccuVein

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    Peripheral venous access is an essential part of modern in-patient medical care that is poorly managed and has a high rate of failure.  Patients and clinicians are frustrated because they wish it could be done better.  Old fashioned concepts and inadequate attention to developing best practices has led to the creation of an epidemic of difficult vascular access patients.  Our knowledge and experience are growing and with the help of vein visualization technology, we are at a turning point to help reduce the number of venipuncture attempts and better preserve veins.  Near Infrared (NIR) technology is well suited to help us implement these best practices.  It provides a rapid means to assess a patient’s venous options, identifies potential venous targets, and helps optimize catheter position.  It has also been proven to reduce venipuncture attempts, improve first attempt success and prolong dwell times.  It thus helps improve efficiency and reduce overall costs both materially and nursing time.  NIR can also reduce the need for central venous access by providing more venous options, thus reducing the risk of CLABSI.  NIR is an incredibly important tool for our approach to modern venous access best practice.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Identify the problems associated with our current approach to peripheral venous access and how it leads to pain, frustration and the creation of difficult vascular access (DVA) patients
    • Review best practice concepts of optimal site selection and reduced venipunctures to support vein preservation and improved vein health
    • Discuss how NIR technology supports peripheral access best practice in multiple ways and how it directly helps support prolonging dwell times, vein preservation and improve patient care


    Gregory Schears, MD

    Mayo Clinic

    Dr. Gregory J. Schears, M.D. is a Professor of Anesthesiology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN.  He is a pediatric intensivist and anesthesiologist by training and cares for both adult and pediatric patients in his practice. He has a long standing interest in reducing patient complications and improving our approach to vascular access and patient safety. Dr. Schears completed his pediatric residency at St. Louis Children's Hospital, his anesthesia residency, pediatric anesthesia fellowship and pediatric critical care fellowship at John's Hopkins hospital, and worked at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia/ Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania for 5 years until he was recruited to the Mayo Clinic in 2001 to head the ECMO service. There he serves as Consultant in Department of Anesthesiology at Mayo Clinic, Rochester, Minnesota and is the physician liaison to the nurse led PICC team, former Medical Director of the ECMO Service for 16 years and Co-Director of the Congenital Heart Unit.  He has served on the editorial board for JAVA and on the AVA Board of Directors as Treasurer. He is also joining the AVA Patient Safety Foundation board this year.  He is very active with product development to help reduce complications and has given hundreds of presentations locally, regionally, nationally and internationally.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: October 21, 2023

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Types and Uses of Various SARS-CoV-19 Tests

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 10/07/2020

    The novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-19) was first identified in Wuhan, China in December 2019. Since that time, it has rapidly spread across the globe. To help combat the epidemic, multiple testing techniques have been developed. Such technologies include molecular and diagnostic assays which detect active infection as well as antibody tests that may identify if a person has been previously exposed to the virus. In this webinar the process and science of the various testing strategies will be discussed as well as a look toward future testing techniques.

    The novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-19) was first identified in Wuhan, China in December 2019. Since that time, it has rapidly spread across the globe.  To help combat the epidemic, multiple testing techniques have been developed.  Such technologies include molecular and diagnostic assays which detect active infection as well as antibody tests that may identify if a person has been previously exposed to the virus.  In this webinar the process and science of the various testing strategies will be discussed as well as a look toward future testing techniques.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Differentiate between diagnostic and antibody tests for SARS-CoV-19.
    • Describe the differences, pros, and cons between a nucleic acid and antigen diagnostic test.
    • Given a patient case, identify the best SARS-CoV-19 test to use.

    Stephanie James, PhD, MBA

    Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Science, Regis University School of Pharmacy

    Dr. Stephanie James is an Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Science in the Regis University School of Pharmacy, where she teaches the immunology and infectious disease units.  She is also the current laboratory director of the Regis University Pharmacy testing lab where she processes and tests patient samples for coronavirus.  Dr. James earned her PhD in Biological Education from the University of Northern Colorado and completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: October 7, 2023

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • INS 2020 Virtual Conference Recordings Package

    Contains 31 Product(s)

    INS 2020 Virtual will come directly to you, in the comfort of your own home or office! Here you have the ability to view all 30 sessions at your convenience. The entire program has been approved for 30 Contact Hours and 60 CRNI® RUs and meetings the INS meetings criteria.​

    INS 2020 Virtual will come directly to you, in the comfort of your own home or office! Here you have the ability to view all 30 sessions at your convenience. The entire program has been approved for 30 Contact Hours and 60 CRNI® RUs and meetings the INS meetings criteria.

  • What’s Bugging You? A Review of Antibiotic Infusion Therapy

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 09/23/2020

    Treatment of complicated infections with intravenous antibiotics has largely transitioned to the outpatient setting due to inpatient costs and improved patient satisfaction. Infusion nurses are crucial in the management of patient symptoms, antibiotic adverse effects, and appropriate monitoring in all settings. This webinar will cover the key components of antimicrobial selection and monitoring, including adverse effects. In addition, some new antimicrobial therapies will also be reviewed.

    Treatment of complicated infections with intravenous antibiotics has largely transitioned to the outpatient setting due to inpatient costs and improved patient satisfaction. Infusion nurses are crucial in the management of patient symptoms, antibiotic adverse effects, and appropriate monitoring in all settings. This webinar will cover the key components of antimicrobial selection and monitoring, including adverse effects. In addition, some new antimicrobial therapies will also be reviewed.

     

    Learning Objectives

    ·       Describe factors involved in antimicrobial selection for treatment of complicated infections including:

              o   Indication

              o   Antimicrobial spectrum

              o   Dosing considerations

    ·       Verbalize adverse effects and monitoring for commonly used antibiotic infusions

    ​Amber Streifel, PharmD

    Outpatient Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapist/OPAT pharmacist, Oregon Health & Science University

    Amber Streifel, PharmD is the Outpatient Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapist/OPAT pharmacist at Oregon Health & Science University. She earned her PharmD at the University of Maryland, Baltimore. She completed her PGY1 pharmacy residency at OHSU and her PGY2 in Infectious Diseases at the University of Colorado, Denver.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: September 23, 2023

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Utilizing Data to Inform Decision Making in a Pandemic and Shape Future Practices

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 08/12/2020

    The SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19 has disrupted life as we know it, including how we practice and deliver healthcare. During this unprecedented time, it is critical to utilize data to inform decision making and future practices. Data collection and analysis have critical roles in shaping programs, tracking progress, evaluating results, demonstrating accountability, and informing policies that will improve plans for future events. This presentation will take you through an historic journey covering several pandemics and will showcase how data collection and research significantly contributed to informed decision making. We will explore the importance of both qualitative and quantitative research, various data sources, and data reporting limitations, as well as opportunities to affect change during this pandemic and well into the future.

    The SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19 has disrupted life as we know it, including how we practice and deliver healthcare. During this unprecedented time, it is critical to utilize data to inform decision making and future practices. Data collection and analysis have critical roles in shaping programs, tracking progress, evaluating results, demonstrating accountability, and informing policies that will improve plans for future events. This presentation will take you through an historic journey covering several pandemics and will showcase how data collection and research significantly contributed to informed decision making. We will explore the importance of both qualitative and quantitative research, various data sources, and data reporting limitations, as well as opportunities to affect change during this pandemic and well into the future.

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this webinar, learners will be able to: 

    •       Discuss the importance of data collection during a pandemic

    •       Review the importance of both qualitative and quantitative research.

    •       Explore how data drives informed decision-making.

    •       Review current COVID-19 data reporting limitations and opportunities.

    Buffy Lloyd-Krejci

    Founder, Lloyd-Krejci Consulting

    Founder Dr. Buffy Lloyd-Krejci has always had a passion for mitigating infectious diseases through a data-driven approach. Utilizing her degrees in Applied Mathematics and Bio-Medical Informatics, she participated in a national CDC and CMS pilot study supporting long-term care facilities in enrolling and reporting Clostridioides difficile infection into NHSN. Buffy realized how infections impact this vulnerable patient population with national estimates of 1-3 million infections leading to 380,000 deaths every year. Drawn to action to improve the infection prevention landscape, she founded Lloyd-Krejci Consulting.  

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: August 12, 2023

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Pandemic Perspectives: Placing COVID-19 in Historical Context

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/15/2020

    PANDEMIC: Prevalence in an entire country or the world. Historical records indicate infectious diseases have reached pandemic proportions throughout history, each affecting thousands, even millions of people across the globe. The coronavirus (COVID-19), now listed among other notorious diseases, has impacted 216 countries or territories and has infected more than 9 million people. This webinar presents COVID-19 within an historical context and includes a review of viral and bacterial infection and transmission.

    PANDEMIC: Prevalence in an entire country or the world. Historical records indicate infectious diseases have reached pandemic proportions throughout history, each affecting thousands, even millions of people across the globe. The coronavirus (COVID-19), now listed among other notorious diseases, has impacted 216 countries or territories and has infected more than 9 million people. This webinar presents COVID-19 within an historical context and includes a review of viral and bacterial infection and transmission. 

    Learning Outcomes:
    At the conclusion of this webinar, learners will be able to: 
    1) Recognize COVID-19 in relation to other notable pandemic diseases
    2) Describe the differences between viral and bacterial infection
    3) List common types of transmission and transmission prevention 

    Dawn Berndt, DNP, RN, CRNI®

    Clinical Education & Publications Manager, INS

    Dawn serves as INS’ Clinical Education and Publications Manager. She has been an active INS member and a CRNI® since 2005. She served on INS’ National Council on Education from 2011 to 2014 and on INS’ Board of Directors as a Director-at-Large from 2017 to 2018. Prior to joining the INS team, Dawn worked for 13 years as a clinical nurse specialist for infusion and as nurse manager of the infusion center, the venous access team, and the RN response team at the University of Wisconsin Health - University Hospital. Dawn holds a doctor of nursing practice in clinical leadership from the Henry Predolin School of Nursing at Edgewood College in Madison, Wisconsin; a master’s of nursing education from the University of Wisconsin School of Nursing; and a bachelor’s degree in nursing from the University of Phoenix in Phoenix.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: July 15, 2023

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

  • Biosimilars in Cancer Therapy and Beyond: Implications for Nursing Practice

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/17/2020

    This webinar will guide the participant through the brief history of biologics. We will explore the science and the advances that have been made since the first EMA-approved biosimilar, omnitropin, a recombinant human growth hormone with indications for pituitary dwarfism, Prader-Willi Syndrome, and Turner Syndrome, hit the EU market in 2006, as well as the first FDA-approved biosimilar, filgrastim-sndz hit the US market in 2015. A robust discussion on the progress of biosimilars in Europe and the US, relating to research and development, access, outcomes, cost savings, and nursing implications before, during, and after biosimilar administration are included in this webinar.

    Commerical Support: Coherus

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    Biosimilars are biologics, such as hormones and monoclonal antibodies, which are produced from living systems that may be sourced from nature or “genetically engineered,” AKA “biotech” products. A biosimilar is defined as a biologic product that is highly similar to and has no clinically meaningful differences from an existing FDA-approved reference biologic. Biologics have revolutionized the treatment and management of many malignant diseases, such as cancer. Biosimilars provide opportunities for improving healthcare access and outcomes, as well as reducing overall healthcare costs because of their cheaper price, relative to their reference biologics. 

    This webinar will guide the participant through the brief history of biologics. We will explore the science and the advances that have been made since the first EMA-approved biosimilar, omnitropin, a recombinant human growth hormone with indications for pituitary dwarfism, Prader-Willi Syndrome, and Turner Syndrome, hit the EU market in 2006, as well as the first FDA-approved biosimilar, filgrastim-sndz hit the US market in 2015. A robust discussion on the progress of biosimilars in Europe and the US, relating to research and development, access, outcomes, cost savings, and nursing implications before, during, and after biosimilar administration are included in this webinar.

    Learning Outcomes: At the conclusion of this webinar, learners will be able to:

    o Describe the history, science and advances in biosimilar development, analytical methods, and commercialization
    o Verbalize the step-wise approach for the development of biosimilars
    o Outline the nursing implications for interchangeability and substitution issues concerning biosimilars
    o Summarize the FDA-approved indications of biosimilars and the nursing roles before, during, and after their administrations 

    Joseph D. Tariman, PhD, RN, ANP-BC, FAAN

    Dr. Joseph D. Tariman, PhD, RN, ANP-BC, FAAN, is the editor and author of the only myeloma nursing textbooks (1st, 2nd, and the upcoming 3rd editions), author of eight myeloma book chapters, 18 conference abstracts, and 72 PubMed-indexed, peer-reviewed papers. He has given hundreds of presentations on topics affecting myeloma nursing practice, including the use of biosimilars, at local, regional, national and international conferences. He is currently an associate editor for the Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing through June 2020.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: June 17, 2023

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • The Psychological Crisis of COVID-19 that too few are talking about: CLINICIANS AT RISK

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/10/2020

    INS and AVA are coming together to address an issue of profound importance to the infusion and vascular access communities. Healthcare workers are facing significant challenges in their professional and personal lives, due to COVID-19. These challenges may result in ongoing stress and evoke feelings of anxiety, sadness, hopelessness, guilt, and anger. This is matter of significance and urgency for clinicians. We are partnering with AVA to create awareness and promote dialogue about this issue within our community. We are offering this webinar at no cost to non-members and we encourage everyone to share in this opportunity. Join INS and AVA Directors of Clinical Education, Marlene Steinheiser and Judy Thompson, as they share experiences, include audience interaction, and use case studies to illustrate specific, practical interventions to minimize stress. They will also discuss the science that underpins current stressors.

    image    image

    INS and AVA are coming together to address an issue of profound importance to the infusion and vascular access communities. Healthcare workers are facing significant challenges in their professional and personal lives, due to COVID-19. These challenges may result in ongoing stress and evoke feelings of anxiety, sadness, hopelessness, guilt, and anger. This is matter of significance and urgency for clinicians. We are partnering with AVA to create awareness and promote dialogue about this issue within our community. We are offering this webinar at no cost to non-members and we encourage everyone to share in this opportunity.  

    Join INS and AVA Directors of Clinical Education, Marlene Steinheiser and Judy Thompson, as they share experiences, include audience interaction, and use case studies to illustrate specific, practical interventions to minimize stress. They will also discuss the science that underpins current stressors.

    Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this webinar, the clinician will be able to:

    o Describe compassion fatigue, burnout, secondary traumatic stress, second victim and moral distress
    o Recognize common challenges and stressors related to the pandemic
    o Identify and implement at least one practical intervention to help reduce stress
    o List several resources from nationally recognized professional organizations


    Marlene Steinheiser, PhD, RN, CRNI®

    Director of Clinical Education, INS

    Marlene Steinheiser, PhD, RN, CRNI®, is the Director of Clinical Education for INS. In her role, she directs the development of educational programs and resources for INS and develops strategic alliances with other organizations. She earned her PhD in nursing at the University of Arizona, conducting research focusing on compassion fatigue among healthcare professionals. A nurse for more than 32 years, Dr. Steinheiser has had experience in acute care, home infusion, long-term care, regulatory organizations, and academic nursing.

    Judy Thompson, MSNED, RN, VA-BC

    Director of Clinical Education, AVA

    Judy Thompson, MSNED, RN, VA-BC, has been a vascular access vascular access specialist since 2004. She has experienced the joys and heartbreak of this craft, having advanced her practice to include insertion of all peripherally and centrally inserted catheters, as well as arterial devices. She is a founding member and president of her local Vascular Access Network and has served as president of AVA in 2017. She joined the AVA staff in 2018 as Director of Clinical Education.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: June 10, 2023

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    This course fulfills 1 credit towards VA-BCTM recertification.

  • Normalization of Deviance: Antithesis of Safety

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 05/06/2020

    Normalization of deviance was first described in 1969 in the context of NASA failure(s). Deviant behavior is a fundamental cause of serious safety events in healthcare today. Persistent non-compliance with rules and standards of care becomes the accepted norm and staff become unaware of the potential impact on patient safety, quality of care, and employee morale. This lesson on normalization of deviance is presented by a nurse with over 40 years of experience as a clinician, leader, and a consultant. Real-life examples will be shared and tactics for managing instances of deviance will be explored.

    Normalization of deviance was first described in 1969 in the context of NASA failure(s). Deviant behavior is a fundamental cause of serious safety events in healthcare today.  Persistent non-compliance with rules and standards of care becomes the accepted norm and staff become unaware of the potential impact on patient safety, quality of care, and employee morale. This lesson on normalization of deviance is presented by a nurse with over 40 years of experience as a clinician, leader, and a consultant. Real-life examples will be shared and tactics for managing instances of deviance will be explored.  

    Learning Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:

    o Contrast deviant behavior with innovation
    o Relate persistent deviance to the culture of safety
    o Describe 3 approaches for managing deviance

    ​Maureen Burger MSN, RN, CPHQ, FACHE

    Chief Nursing Officer, Visante Inc.

    Maureen Burger MSN, RN, CPHQ, FACHE, is the Chief Nursing Officer for Visante Inc., a medication management consulting firm. She has a long career in positions of progressive responsibility, both in nursing and hospital administration. Most recently, Maureen has served as Vice President of Quality, Safety, Risk, Accreditation, and Infection Control for Indiana University Health. As a consultant, she is thrilled to be able to focus her research, writing, and consulting on medication safety, especially when it involves IV push medications and drug diversion in healthcare. Ms. Burger obtained a master’s degree in Critical Care Nursing from Case Western Reserve University. She is certified in Healthcare Quality and is recognized as a Fellow by the American College of Healthcare Executives. When she is not advocating for patients and safety, Maureen, and her husband breed and race thoroughbred horses. Maureen lives in Indianapolis, IN. 

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: May 6, 2023

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.