Of the 40 recertification units (RUs) required for a CRNI® to recertify, at least 30 RUs must be obtained by attending any INS Meeting (live or online). Up to 10 RUs may be earned from the non INS Meeting category. The learning assets in this section have all been approved for RUs. Virtual Meetings and Conference Learning meet the INS Meeting criteria. Webinars meet the non INS Meeting criteria. All webinars are free to INS members.

CRNI® Recertification Approved

  • Incorporating the INS Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice into Patient Care

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 08/11/2021 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    Infusion therapy necessitates the use of best evidence for all patients in all settings while considering high reliability and patient-centered care. In this session, we will review the development of and evidence ratings for the INS Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice and describe the methods for incorporating the Standards into practice. Learn by case examples how to apply the INS Standards while caring for patients.

    Infusion therapy necessitates the use of best evidence for all patients in all settings while considering high reliability and patient-centered care. In this session, we will review the development of and evidence ratings for the INS Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice and describe the methods for incorporating the Standards into practice. Learn by case examples how to apply the INS Standards while caring for patients.

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this presentation, learners will be able to:

    1.     Define the components of evidence-based practice.

    2.     Explain briefly how the INS Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice are developed.

    3.     Identify the highest-evidence rating for the body of evidence in the Standards.

    4.     Discuss the principles of high reliability and patient-centered care.

    5.     Describe 3 methods of incorporating or applying the Standards to practice

    Mary Hagle, PhD, RN, NPD-BC, FAAN

    Nurse Scientist

    Mary Hagle, PhD, RN, NPD-BC, FAAN, is a nurse scientist with extensive clinical experiences in academic and community medical centers. She works with nurses and their infusion therapy practice in acute, ambulatory, community, and long-term care settings. Dr Hagle served as a committee member for the 2011, 2016, and 2021 revisions of the Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice. She is a mentor for research and quality improvement teams, and a leader for translating evidence into practice.

      

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: August 11, 2024

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Managing Osteomyelitis

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 07/28/2021 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    Osteomyelitis is generally defined as an inflammation process of the bone or joint caused by an infectious organism and resulting in bone destruction and even necrosis. Osteomyelitis following joint replacement surgery can present as an early infection or several years later as a result of bacterial seeding of the implanted joint. For patients with diabetes, osteomyelitis can be a life-altering event. Poor blood supply, undetected wounds, loss of protective sensation, and altered immune defenses are common predisposing factors for the development of osteomyelitis of the lower extremities. This session will provide an overview of osteomyelitis including the pathophysiology, etiology, and predisposing conditions, and will conclude with a detailed discussion on antibiotic treatment.

    Osteomyelitis is generally defined as an inflammation process of the bone or joint caused by an infectious organism and resulting in bone destruction and even necrosis. Osteomyelitis following joint replacement surgery can present as an early infection or several years later as a result of bacterial seeding of the implanted joint. For patients with diabetes, osteomyelitis can be a life-altering event. Poor blood supply, undetected wounds, loss of protective sensation, and altered immune defenses are common predisposing factors for the development of osteomyelitis of the lower extremities. This session will provide an overview of osteomyelitis including the pathophysiology, etiology, and predisposing conditions, and will conclude with a detailed discussion on antibiotic treatment.

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this webinar, learners will be able to: 

    1. Describe the pathophysiology, etiology, and predisposing factors related to osteomyelitis
    2. Discuss treatment of osteomyelitis
    3. Predict the vascular access needs of the patient with osteomyelitis 


    Becky Linn, PharmD, BCPS

    Becky S. Linn, PharmD, BCPS, received her Doctor of Pharmacy from the University of Wyoming School of Pharmacy, then went on to practice clinical pharmacy at Poudre Valley Hospital in Fort Collins, CO, with emphases in critical care and student rotation coordination. Dr. Linn joined the faculty at Wyoming in 2013 and teaches in the therapeutics series of courses and in clinical pharmacokinetics. Dr. Linn’s practice site involves daily rounding with an inpatient family medicine team for the Fort Collins Family Medicine Residency, and her teaching interests at the practice site and classroom include infectious diseases and cardiology. She serves as Champion of the Residency Teaching Certificate for the School of Pharmacy and is a member of the Student Affairs and Faculty Development Committees. Her research interests include infectious diseases and interprofessional education models.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: July 28, 2024

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Virtual Conference: Promoting Vessel Health and Preservation Through Vein Visualization

    Contains 6 Product(s)

    This 2-day virtual program will provide registrants with guidance regarding the use of vascular visualization technology. Expert led sessions will include instruction on how to use this technology to increase vascular access device insertion success, reduce insertion-related complications, develop structured education programs to promote clinician assuredness, and promote successful phlebotomy procedures. Registrants will receive 5 Contact Hours and those holding the CRNI® credential will receive 10 Recertification Units.

    This 2-day virtual program will provide registrants with guidance regarding the use of vascular visualization technology. Expert led sessions will include instruction on how to use this technology to increase vascular access device insertion success, reduce insertion-related complications, develop structured education programs to promote clinician assuredness, and promote successful phlebotomy procedures. Registrants will receive 5 Contact Hours and those holding the CRNI® credential will receive 10 Recertification Units.

  • Aseptic Non Touch Technique (ANTT®) Clinical Practice Framework

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/16/2021

    The INS Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice (the Standards) has introduced a new, dedicated standard for aseptic technique which features the original, internationally used, and explicitly defined ANTT® Clinical Practice Framework. Originated by Stephen Rowley and defined by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), ANTT® is a specific type of aseptic technique with a unique theory and Clinical Practice Framework. The Framework is designed for use with all invasive clinical procedures and management of indwelling medical devices in all patients. During this presentation, we will learn the fundamentals of the ANTT Framework, the new INS Standard for ANTT, and how to implement ANTT into your daily practice and organization.

    The INS Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice (the Standards) has introduced a new, dedicated standard for aseptic technique which features the original, internationally used, and explicitly defined ANTT® Clinical Practice Framework. Originated by Stephen Rowley and defined by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE), ANTT® is a specific type of aseptic technique with a unique theory and Clinical Practice Framework. The Framework is designed for use with all invasive clinical procedures and management of indwelling medical devices in all patients. During this presentation, we will learn the fundamentals of the ANTT Framework, the new INS Standard for ANTT, and how to implement ANTT into your daily practice and organization.

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this webinar, learners will be able to: 

    1. Describe the essentials of the ANTT Framework
    2. Verbalize the components of the new 2021 INS Standard for ANTT
    3. Describe how to apply the principles of ANTT into practice


    Stephen Rowley, MSc, BSc (Hons), RGN, RSCN

    Clinical Director

    Association for Safe Aseptic Practice

    Stephen Rowley is the originator of the Aseptic Non Touch Technique (ANTT®) Clinical Practice Framework. As Clinical Director of the Association for Safe Aseptic Practice, a nonprofit, non-governmental organization (NGO) based in the United Kingdom, Mr. Rowley has led the ongoing development and dissemination of ANTT® globally. Developed in the late 1990s, ANTT® is used in more than 25 countries and is rapidly becoming the international standard framework and competency platform for aseptic technique. Working closely with health care organizations and governments internationally, Mr. Rowley has helped realize significant improvements in aseptic practice and championed the reduction of health care-associated infection. His peer reviewed publications are widely read and cited.

    Simon Clare, MRes, BA, RGN

    Research and Practice Development Director

    The Association for Safe Aseptic Practice (ASAP

    Simon Clare is Research and Practice Development Director at The Association for Safe Aseptic Practice (ASAP). A former visiting lecturer and module leader at City University in London, he is also currently the Practice Development Lead for Haematology at University College Hospital in London (UCLH); having previously worked at the Myeloma Institute at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) in Little Rock, Arkansas. For the past 15 years he has been working with the ANTT® programme; developing resources, teaching, and presenting in the United Kingdom and around the world.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: June 16, 2024

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Vesicant Identification and Appropriate Extravasation and Infiltration Treatment

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 05/05/2021

    Infiltration and extravasation will sometimes occur, despite best efforts in prevention. Overcoming barriers to prompt and appropriate treatment requires identification of vesicants and treatment options. This webinar is the second in a two-part presentation. During this session, we will learn about the evidence and principles guiding use of temperature therapy, antidote administration or use of an enzyme dispersal agent, along with other supportive therapies, that will facilitate appropriate treatment selection.

    Infiltration and extravasation will sometimes occur, despite best efforts in prevention. Overcoming barriers to prompt and appropriate treatment requires identification of vesicants and treatment options. This webinar is the second in a two-part presentation. During this session, we will learn about the evidence and principles guiding use of temperature therapy, antidote administration or use of an enzyme dispersal agent, along with other supportive therapies, that will facilitate appropriate treatment selection.

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this webinar, learners will be able to: 

    1. Discuss barriers to prompt and appropriate treatment of extravasation
    2. Describe the relationship between mechanism of tissue injury, the vesicant, and appropriate antidote (s)/treatment strategies
    3. Identify alternative/adjunctive therapies for extravasation treatment
    4. Recognize surgical removal techniques and indications


    Jennie Ong, PharmD

    Clinical Pharmacist

    Bryan Medical Center

    Dr. Jennie Ong has been a clinical pharmacist at Bryan Medical Center in Lincoln Nebraska for 10 years. As a result of 4 years of extensive research, Dr. Ong, along with co-author Ruth Van Gerpen, recently published "Recommendations for Management of Noncytotoxic Vesicant Extravasations". This is the first set of treatment recommendations based not only on extravasation principles but also on available published evidence. It was cited in the 2021 Infusion Nursing Society Standards of Practice.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: May 5, 2024

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Prevention and Early Recognition of Infiltration and Extravasation

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 04/14/2021

    Infiltration and extravasation are inherent risks of IV therapy. Knowing how and why infiltration and extravasation may occur helps clinicians understand the practice standards for safe IV therapy. This webinar is the first of a two-part presentation. During this session, we will learn how implementing the 2021 INS Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice can maximize prevention of these iatrogenic injuries and facilitate prompt recognition for best treatment outcomes.

    Infiltration and extravasation are inherent risks of IV therapy. Knowing how and why infiltration and extravasation may occur helps clinicians understand the practice standards for safe IV therapy. This webinar is the first of a two-part presentation. During this session, we will learn how implementing the 2021 INS Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice can maximize prevention of these iatrogenic injuries and facilitate prompt recognition for best treatment outcomes.

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this webinar, learners will be able to: 

    1. Distinguish between infiltration and extravasation and describe how infiltrations/extravasations occur
    2. Identify risk factors and methods of preventing infiltration/extravasation
    3. Discuss barriers to prompt and appropriate treatment of infiltration/extravasation
    4. Select and apply an appropriate staging tool for extravasation symptoms


    Jennie Ong, PharmD

    Clinical Pharmacist

    Bryan Medical Center

    Dr. Jennie Ong has been a clinical pharmacist at Bryan Medical Center in Lincoln Nebraska for 10 years. As a result of 4 years of extensive research, Dr. Ong, along with co-author Ruth Van Gerpen, recently published "Recommendations for Management of Noncytotoxic Vesicant Extravasations". This is the first set of treatment recommendations based not only on extravasation principles but also on available published evidence. It was cited in the 2021 Infusion Nursing Society Standards of Practice.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: April 14, 2024

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Risk factors and characteristics of short peripheral intravenous catheter (PIVC) failure: Improving Patient Outcomes

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 03/24/2021

    Short peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) are a ubiquitous and necessary invasive clinical device. Although patient need for short PIVCs is high, one in three catheters will fail before the completion of treatment. To improve insertion and post insertion care, and reduce complications, there is an urgent need for substantial and interdisciplinary interventions. This presentation will provide an overview of recent short PIVC research, including a large systematic review of non-infectious complications for 76,997 short PIVCs; and a multivariate analysis of 12 studies (11,830 PIVCs) identifying patient, catheter and provider risk factors associated with failure.

    Short peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) are a ubiquitous and necessary invasive clinical device. Although patient need for short PIVCs is high, one in three catheters will fail before the completion of treatment. To improve insertion and post insertion care, and reduce complications, there is an urgent need for substantial and interdisciplinary interventions.

    This presentation will provide an overview of recent short PIVC research, including a large systematic review of non-infectious complications for 76,997 short PIVCs; and a multivariate analysis of 12 studies (11,830 PIVCs) identifying patient, catheter and provider risk factors associated with failure. 

    Learning Objectives:

    At the conclusion of this webinar, the participants will be able to:

    1. Describe non-infectious complications of short PIVCs (occlusions, dislodgement, leakage, and/or mechanical phlebitis).

    2. Understand the global impact of short PIVC complications and failure.

    3. Explain how understanding patient, catheter and provider risk factors can optimize short PIVC survival.  

    Dr Nicole Marsh, RN, MAdvPrac (healthcare research), PhD

    Clinical Trial Director for the Alliance for Vascular Access Teaching and Research

    Alliance for Vascular Access Teaching and Research (AVATAR)

    Dr Nicole Marsh’s research is focused on improving patient outcomes and decreasing complications associated with vascular access across the acute clinical care and community settings. She is the Nursing and Midwifery Director of Research at the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital and the Clinical Trial Director for the Alliance for Vascular Access Teaching and Research (AVATAR; https://www.avatargroup.org.au/). In addition, she has been a Clinical Trial Coordinator for more than 30 single and multi-center vascular access clinical trials. Dr. Marsh has over 25 years of experience in acute care nursing.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: March 24, 2024

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Point-of-Care Ultrasound to Identify Landmarks of the Proximal Humerus for Potential Use in Intraosseous Vascular Access: An Educational Journey to Improve Clinical Care

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 02/25/2021

    Establishing vascular access is of vital importance during resuscitation in cases of cardiac arrest. When obtaining peripheral or central intravenous access is difficult or impossible, intraosseous (IO) access is an alternative route for immediate fluid and medication delivery. The proximal humerus is one of the anatomic sites available for IO access, but the inability to identify its landmarks by palpation is considered an absolute contraindication for this procedure. During this webinar, our presenter will describe his educational journey that led to the initial descriptions of point-of-care ultrasonography to improve landmark identification of the proximal humerus and its potential use for intraosseous vascular access.

    Establishing vascular access is of vital importance during resuscitation in cases of cardiac arrest. When obtaining peripheral or central intravenous access is difficult or impossible, intraosseous (IO) access is an alternative route for immediate fluid and medication delivery. The proximal humerus is one of the anatomic sites available for IO access, but the inability to identify its landmarks by palpation is considered an absolute contraindication for this procedure.

    During this webinar, our presenter will describe his educational journey that led to the initial descriptions of point-of-care ultrasonography to improve landmark identification of the proximal humerus and its potential use for intraosseous vascular access.

    Learning Objectives:

    At the conclusion of this webinar, the participants will be able to:

    1. Recognize the importance of intraosseous (IO) access as an effective route to the intravascular space.

    2. Compare and contrast the landmark identification techniques of the proximal humerus by palpation vs. ultrasound.

    3. Recognize the value of deliberate practice and mastery learning principles for task-training acquisition.

    4. Describe the essential components of a curriculum-based simulation training program to improve competencies in IO access.

    Sergio Bustamante, MD, CHSE

    Anesthesiologist

    Department of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia at Cleveland Clinic

    Dr. Sergio Bustamante is a staff anesthesiologist in the Department of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia at Cleveland Clinic. He is the medical director of the Department's simulation laboratory and core faculty of the Simulation Center. Dr. Bustamante is also a clinical assistant professor at Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University and current Section Chair of Anesthesia at the Society for Simulation in Healthcare. He has a strong interest in healthcare education, task-training modalities, high-fidelity simulation, and debriefing.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: February 25, 2024

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Resetting the Standards: Examining the 2021 Changes Virtual Conference

    Contains 8 Product(s)

    The Standards of Practice committee will explore some of the changes that can be found in the newest edition of the Standards. During each day, there will be an opportunity for attendees to engage with members of the committee to ask clarifying questions and to discuss how these changes will impact clinical practice. At the conclusion of the meeting you will be able to claim contact hours and CRNI® recertification units.

    The Standards of Practice committee will explore some of the changes that can be found in the newest edition of the Standards. During each day, there will be an opportunity for attendees to engage with members of the committee to ask clarifying questions and to discuss how these changes will impact clinical practice. At the conclusion of the meeting you will be able to claim contact hours and CRNI® recertification units. 

  • Perceptions of Adult Hospitalized Patients with Difficult Venous Access Experiencing Short Peripheral Catheter Insertion: An Opportunity for Clinicians to Improve Patients’ Experiences

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 01/27/2021

    Hospitalized patients require venous access for procedures, treatments, or therapies. The short peripheral catheter (SPC) is one option for patients who need intravenous (IV) access. Patients with difficult vasculature sometimes require multiple attempts to obtain SPC access. This session will explore the perceptions and experiences of patients with difficult access, requiring multiple attempts to obtain SPC access. Ways clinicians can improve the patient’s experience will also be discussed.

    Hospitalized patients require venous access for procedures, treatments, or therapies. The short peripheral catheter (SPC) is one option for patients who need intravenous (IV) access. Patients with difficult vasculature sometimes require multiple attempts to obtain SPC access. This session will explore the perceptions and experiences of patients with difficult access, requiring multiple attempts to obtain SPC access. Ways clinicians can improve the patient’s experience will also be discussed. 

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this webinar, learners will be able to: 

    a) describe the physical and emotional impact the SPC insertion may have on a patient with difficult venous access and

    b) identify at least three measures to improve the experience of the patient with difficult access.

    Ann Plohal, PhD, RN, ACNS-BC, CRNI®, VA-BC

    Vascular Access Team

    St. Joseph Hospital Medical Center

    Dr. Ann Plohal received her PhD in 2015. She wrote her dissertation on the patient perception of short peripheral catheter insertion for patients with difficult access. Ann is past president of the Infusion Nurses Society. She has published multiple articles regarding infusion therapy and is an active infusion and vascular access nurse.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: January 27, 2024

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.