Of the 40 recertification units (RUs) required for a CRNI® to recertify, at least 30 RUs must be obtained by attending any INS Meeting (live or online). Up to 10 RUs may be earned from the non INS Meeting category. The learning assets in this section have all been approved for RUs. Virtual Conferences meet the INS Meeting criteria. Webinars meet the non INS Meeting criteria. All webinars are free to INS members.

CRNI® Recertification Approved

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  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 01/17/2024 at 1:00 AM (EST)

    Smart infusion pumps have been around for over 20 years and represent one of the most valuable pieces of health care technology in place to promote patient safety. By allowing significant control over how intravenous medications are administered, errors can be prevented prior to them reaching the patient. A good catch is when smart infusion pump programming triggers an alert for a value that is considered unsafe and temporarily stops additional forward programming of the smart infusion pump. In this session, we will review examples of good catches, discuss how health care systems can quantify cost savings from severe harms averted, and explain how to champion smart pumps as a key tool to safely administer intravenous medications.

    Smart infusion pumps have been around for over 20 years and represent one of the most valuable pieces of health care technology in place to promote patient safety.  By allowing significant control over how intravenous medications are administered, errors can be prevented prior to them reaching the patient. A good catch is when smart infusion pump programming triggers an alert for a value that is considered unsafe and temporarily stops additional forward programming of the smart infusion pump. In this session, we will review examples of good catches, discuss how health care systems can quantify cost savings from severe harms averted, and explain how to champion smart pumps as a key tool to safely administer intravenous medications.

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, learners will be able to: 

    1.     Discuss literature on the use of smart infusion pumps and Dose Error Reduction Software (DERS).

    2.     Define a good catch.

    3.     Describe how good catch data can be used to promote the use of smart infusion pumps to improve patient safety.

    Joanne Hatfield, PharmD, BCPS

    Joanne Hatfield, PharmD, BCPS, is the director of clinical solutions at Bainbridge Health, where she leads the analysis and interpretation of network data in order to provide actionable insights to improve medication safety. Dr. Hatfield also coordinates and provides educational activities for the National Infusion Collaborative, the largest collective of infusion practitioners across the United States. She previously served as clinical manager and cochair of the Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee at University Health-Truman Medical Centers, where she was responsible for complete formulary oversight and clinical operations. Dr. Hatfield is board certified in pharmacotherapy and completed the ASHP Foundation Traineeship in Pain and Palliative Care.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 2 CRNI® recertification units and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: January 17, 2027

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 11/15/2023

    Come learn how to handle the pitfalls in infusion nursing delivery. In this session, we will review the legal challenges with infusion nursing liability and offer reduction strategies. You will gain the tools you need in today’s lawsuit-prone health care system so you can protect one of your greatest assets—your nursing license. This is vital information for every infusion nurse.

    Come learn how to handle the pitfalls in infusion nursing delivery. In this session, we will review the legal challenges with infusion nursing liability and offer reduction strategies. You will gain the tools you need in today’s lawsuit-prone health care system so you can protect one of your greatest assets—your nursing license. This is vital information for every infusion nurse.

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, learners will be able to: 
    • Describe nursing negligence and malpractice and how it affects your everyday nursing practice.
    • Discuss two strategies to reduce your liability exposure.
    • Explain the four elements of nursing malpractice lawsuits that must be proven at trial.

    Elizabeth Rudolph, JD, MSN, RN, PLNC

    Elizabeth Rudolph, JD, MSN, RN, PLNC, is an attorney and nurse with many years of experience practicing health care law in Memphis, Tennessee. She obtained her Bachelor’s in Nursing, Master’s in Nursing, and law degree from Vanderbilt University in Nashville, Tennessee.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 2 CRNI® recertification units and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: November 15, 2026

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Contains 7 Product(s)

    An INS task force was formed to review and update the 2017 vesicant list, identify current issues and risks relative to vesicant administration, and revise the extravasation prevention checklist. Presented by members of the task force, this INS virtual symposium addresses 5 challenging aspects of mitigating the risk of extravasations: identifying vesicants, optimal vascular access device and site choice, clinical practices to avoid extravasation, prevention of legalities with case study examples, and implementation of organizational policies and procedures. Extravasation may result in severe patient injuries including scarring, permanent functional impairment, and even loss of a limb. Such injuries are preventable when clinicians identify which medications and solutions are vesicants, understand infusion-related risks, and implement preventative interventions.

    An INS task force was formed to review and update the 2017 vesicant list, identify current issues and risks relative to vesicant administration, and revise the extravasation prevention checklist. Presented by members of the task force, this INS virtual symposium addresses 5 challenging aspects of mitigating the risk of extravasations: identifying vesicants, optimal vascular access device and site choice, clinical practices to avoid extravasation, prevention of legalities with case study examples, and implementation of organizational policies and procedures. Extravasation may result in severe patient injuries including scarring, permanent functional impairment, and even loss of a limb. Such injuries are preventable when clinicians identify which medications and solutions are vesicants, understand infusion-related risks, and implement preventative interventions.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 10/02/2023

    Thyroid eye disease (TED) is a serious, progressive autoimmune disease with a limited window for pharmacologic treatment during the active disease. During this window, the disease may respond to pharmacologic intervention. During this webinar, we will discuss the progression of thyroid eye disease, as well as the symptoms, causes, management, and treatment modalities.

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    Thyroid eye disease (TED) is a serious, progressive autoimmune disease with a limited window for pharmacologic treatment during the active disease. During this window, the disease may respond to pharmacologic intervention. During this webinar, we will discuss the progression of thyroid eye disease, as well as the symptoms, causes, management, and treatment modalities. 

    Learning Outcome: At the conclusion of this webinar, learners will be able to:
    1. Describe the causes of TED as well as the symptomatology and the progression of the disease.
    2. Discuss management and treatment options available for patients with this condition.

    Dr. Alon Kahana, MD, PhD

    Dr. Alon Kahana, MD, PhD, is an oculoplastic and orbital surgeon in Michigan, and founder of Kahana Oculoplastic and Orbital Surgery PLLC. Dr. Kahana serves as a professor of ophthalmology and vice chair for academic affairs at Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine. Following graduation from Brandeis University, he earned an MD and a PhD in molecular genetics and cell biology at The University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine. This education was followed by a residency in ophthalmology and a fellowship in oculofacial plastic and reconstructive surgery at the University of Wisconsin, Madison. Dr. Kahana served on the faculty of the University of Michigan Kellogg Eye Center, rising to the rank of associate professor with tenure. He left the University of Michigan in 2020 to start his own practice. Dr. Kahana’s research interests include tissue repair and regeneration, thyroid eye disease, cancer stem cells, and surgical outcomes. He has received numerous grants and awards, and serves as the president of the North American Society of Academic Orbital Surgeons.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 2 CRNI® recertification units and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: October 2, 2026

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 09/12/2023

    Although infusion of fluids and medications is traditionally performed intravenously, venous depletion in patients has led to the quest for vessel health preservation. A safe, effective, acceptable, and efficient alternative is the subcutaneous route. However, a lack of organizational policies may contribute to the slow uptake of this practice. An international, interprofessional consensus panel adopted a modified e-Delphi approach to develop practice recommendations for subcutaneous infusion therapy. In this session, you will learn how you can safely administer subcutaneous infusion therapy and help preserve your patients’ veins.

    Although infusion of fluids and medications is traditionally performed intravenously, venous depletion in patients has led to the quest for vessel health preservation. A safe, effective, acceptable, and efficient alternative is the subcutaneous route. However, a lack of organizational policies may contribute to the slow uptake of this practice. An international, interprofessional consensus panel adopted a modified e-Delphi approach to develop practice recommendations for subcutaneous infusion therapy. In this session, you will learn how you can safely administer subcutaneous infusion therapy and help preserve your patients’ veins. 

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, learners will be able to: 
    • Describe indications/contraindications and risks/benefits of subcutaneous infusions.
    • Explain site assessment, device placement, and monitoring of subcutaneous infusions.
    • Identify strategies to support competency and quality. 

    Daphne Broadhurst, RN, MN, CVAA(c)

    Daphne Broadhurst is the director of clinical infusion services for Nipro Canada. She is proud to be a former adjunct research fellow with Griffith University, Australia and a past president of the Canadian Vascular Access Association. She is a costeering lead and coauthor of the 2024 Canadian Vascular Access and Infusion Therapy Guidelines and a coauthor of the International 2021 INS Standards of Infusion Therapy. She is published in 15 journals and has presented vascular access and infusion therapy best practices globally.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 2 CRNI® recertification units and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: September 12, 2026

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 08/23/2023

    Over the last decade, infusion nurses have been increasingly challenged by patients presenting with difficult vascular access, which is often the result of age, comorbidities, or damage from previous failed vascular access devices. Selecting and inserting the right device to meet patients’ clinical needs has become more difficult, and has been worsened by complex organizational factors. Peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) and peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) continue to be the default devices chosen for short-to-moderate term peripherally compatible intravenous treatments. Although midline catheters (MCs) offer an alternate option, the uptake of this device has been limited due to a lack of clinical data supporting their use. This presentation will provide an overview of recent research involving MCs. It will include a summary of international guidelines and share the results from two recent randomised controlled trials (MCs vs PIVCs; MCs vs PICCs) conducted in Brisbane, Australia.

    Over the last decade, infusion nurses have been increasingly challenged by patients presenting with difficult vascular access, which is often the result of age, comorbidities, or damage from previous failed vascular access devices. Selecting and inserting the right device to meet patients’ clinical needs has become more difficult, and has been worsened by complex organizational factors. Peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) and peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) continue to be the default devices chosen for short-to-moderate term peripherally compatible intravenous treatments. Although midline catheters (MCs) offer an alternate option, the uptake of this device has been limited due to a lack of clinical data supporting their use. This presentation will provide an overview of recent research involving MCs. It will include a summary of international guidelines and share the results from two recent randomised controlled trials (MCs vs PIVCs; MCs vs PICCs) conducted in Brisbane, Australia.

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, learners will be able to: 

    • Explain the complications associated with PIVCs, MCs, and PICCs.
    • Understand the different types of MCs available and how they meet clinical and organizational needs.
    • Describe the importance of MC surveillance.
    • Discuss the barriers faced by health care organizations introducing MCs.

    Dr Nicole Marsh, PhD, MAdvPrac, BN

    Dr. Nicole Marsh is the nursing and midwifery director of research at the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital, the largest health service in Australia. Her program of research, which is underpinned by more than 100 publications, focuses on improving patient outcomes and decreasing complications associated with vascular access across the acute clinical care and community setting. She has recently quantified the international incidence of peripheral intravenous catheter failure and identified risk factors associated with this failure, and is currently leading a team who is investigating the clinical and economic benefit of different workforce models for vascular access device insertion to improve patient outcomes. In recognition of her expertise, Dr. Marsh was invited to advise on the development of the Australian Commission on Safety and Quality in Healthcare’s 2021 Peripheral Intravenous Catheter Clinical Care Standard, which all Australian hospitals are expected to use to support and monitor their clinical practice.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 2 CRNI® recertification units and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: August 23, 2026

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/12/2023

    Worldwide, approximately 50 million people are affected by sepsis every year. According to the recent Surviving Sepsis Guidelines, early identification and prompt treatment strategies increase patient survival rates. This webinar will discuss early identification of sepsis, prompt intervention strategies, and guideline updates.

    Worldwide, approximately 50 million people are affected by sepsis every year. According to the recent Surviving Sepsis Guidelines, early identification and prompt treatment strategies increase patient survival rates. This webinar will discuss early identification of sepsis, prompt intervention strategies, and guideline updates.

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, learners will be able to: 

    • Describe sepsis definitions and screening.
    • Discuss the initial management of sepsis including the ‘bundles’ implemented in sepsis treatment pathways.
    • Apply sepsis management guidelines to a patient case. 

    Becky Linn, PharmD, BCPS

    Dr. Becky Linn, PharmD, BCPS, is an associate professor of pharmacy practice at the University of Wyoming School of Pharmacy and a core faculty member with the Fort Collins Family Medicine Residency Program in Ft. Collins, Colorado. Dr. Linn’s career legacy began at Poudre Valley Hospital (PVH) where she worked as a clinical staff pharmacist and held multiple roles including the pioneering of critical care pharmacy services. She received the Outstanding Teacher of the Year Award in both 2017 and 2020 through the Fort Collins Family Medicine Residency Program. Her current research, publications, and speaking engagements include infectious diseases, well-being, and innovative practice models. Dr. Linn enjoys skiing, hiking, camping, trying new things, and spending time with friends and family when not at work.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 2 CRNI® recertification units and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: July 12, 2026

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/14/2023

    When diagnostic systems paint accurate pictures of patients, unnecessary and broad-spectrum antimicrobial use is reduced in favor of appropriate and targeted therapy, keeping antimicrobial resistance in check. Critical results demand that we give diagnostic tools and techniques the necessary development time to remain well ahead of the curve as therapeutic guidelines. As clinicians we have the responsibility of ensuring that new evidence-based practices are incorporated into our patient care, keeping practice advancements pertinent to patient problems. In this session, the attendees will learn about the criticality of diagnostic accuracy and the associated cost of error, be equipped to assess clinical literature with an eye for evidence-driven opportunities to mitigate blood culture contamination, and learn how to best manage this practice change.

    When diagnostic systems paint accurate pictures of patients, unnecessary and broad-spectrum antimicrobial use is reduced in favor of appropriate and targeted therapy, keeping antimicrobial resistance in check. Critical results demand that we give diagnostic tools and techniques the necessary development time to remain well ahead of the curve as therapeutic guidelines.  As clinicians we have the responsibility of ensuring that new evidence-based practices are incorporated into our patient care, keeping practice advancements pertinent to patient problems. In this session, the attendees will learn about the criticality of diagnostic accuracy and the associated cost of error, be equipped to assess clinical literature with an eye for evidence-driven opportunities to mitigate blood culture contamination, and learn how to best manage this practice change.

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, learners will be able to:

    • Review the history of antibiotic resistance detailing the causes and mechanisms of resistance.
    • Describe the impact of contaminated blood cultures on patients, antimicrobial stewardship efforts, quality patient outcomes, and hospital economics.
    • Interpret evidence-based clinical literature to drive a new standard of care for patient quality outcomes.
    • Discuss and influence how diagnostic and antimicrobial stewardship initiatives enhance local practices and progress global goals in health care.
    • Explain and employ tools and methods to implement and sustain new evidence-based practices. 

    Tammy Johnson, BS, RN, CPM

    Tammy Johnson, BS, RN, CPM, is the associate vice president of clinical strategy and customer relations at Magnolia Medical Technologies. With over 30 years in nursing and 20 years as a nurse leader and now executive in the medical device industry, Tammy’s focus remains on changing the standard of care to prevent both patient harm and the misspend of health care monies. Tammy holds degrees in nursing, business, and health care management;  has been evaluated as a highly engaging subject matter expert; has spoken at national meetings for the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), the Infusion Nurses Society (INS), and the Association for Vascular Access (AVA); and been the keynote speaker for several state APIC meetings. She has also been the invited speaker for state hospital associations;  presented at national meetings for the Emergency Nurses Association (ENA), the American Organization for Nursing Leadership (AONL), and the American Hospital Association (AHA); and was  invited to present to the Presidential Advisory Council for Combating Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria in Washington, DC.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 2 CRNI® recertification units and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: June 14, 2026

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 05/17/2023

    About 90% of hospitalized patients receive medication intravenously (IV), making IV therapy one of the most common practices performed by nurses and other clinicians. IV push medications can be particularly dangerous given the immediate bioavailability and the narrow therapeutic dose range, and reversing the effects may prove difficult. There are safety considerations associated with IV push medication preparation and administration. The results of an Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) survey revealed that 84% of the clinicians still dilute IV push medications, including prefilled syringes, and other clinicians enact additional improper practices including the manipulation of ready-to-administer (RTA) medications and dose adjustments. Unsafe IV push preparation and administration practices can lead to microbial contamination, medication errors, needlestick injuries, drug diversion, increase staff time, and medication waste. ISMP and the Infusion Nurses Society Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice recommend providing adult IV push medications in an RTA form to decrease the likelihood of errors and diversion. Clinicians have access to evidence-based practice standards, but in many organizations, a gap exists between understanding the evidence and implementing it. During this webinar, we will discuss the risks associated with IV push medication preparation and administration, barriers to implementation of evidence-based practice, and strategies to improve IV push medication safety including the benefits of RTA IV medications.

    image

    About 90% of hospitalized patients receive medication intravenously (IV), making IV therapy one of the most common practices performed by nurses and other clinicians. IV push medications can be particularly dangerous given the immediate bioavailability and the narrow therapeutic dose range, and reversing the effects may prove difficult. There are safety considerations associated with IV push medication preparation and administration.

    The results of an Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP) survey revealed that 84% of the clinicians still dilute IV push medications, including prefilled syringes, and other clinicians enact additional improper practices including the manipulation of ready-to-administer (RTA) medications and dose adjustments. Unsafe IV push preparation and administration practices can lead to microbial contamination, medication errors, needlestick injuries, drug diversion, increase staff time, and medication waste.

    ISMP and the Infusion Nurses Society Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice recommend providing adult IV push medications in an RTA form to decrease the likelihood of errors and diversion. Clinicians have access to evidence-based practice standards, but in many organizations, a gap exists between understanding the evidence and implementing it. During this webinar, we will discuss the risks associated with IV push medication preparation and administration, barriers to implementation of evidence-based practice, and strategies to improve IV push medication safety including the benefits of RTA IV medications.

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, learners will be able to:

    1. Discuss safety issues associated with IV push medication preparation and administration.
    2. Describe published evidence in the literature, ISMP guidelines, and INS Standards of Practice to guide safe IV push medication preparation and administration.
    3. Explore barriers to implementation of evidence-based practice.
    4. Discuss strategies to improve IV push medication safety.
    5. Debate the benefits of RTA medications.

    Karen Laforet RN, MClSc, CCHN(C), VA-BC™, CVAA(c)

    Karen Laforet is a registered nurse with over 40 years of experience, 30 of those dedicated to the practice of medication and infusion therapy safety. She has practiced in critical care, home care, and long-term care; spent 9 years in industry; and is currently practicing in long-term care. She is board certified in vascular access and nationally certified in community health nursing and IV and infusion therapy. She is on faculty for York University, teaching infusion therapy and advanced IV and medication safety postgraduate courses that she herself designed. She is the lead educator for a Veterans Health Administration (VHA) health care long-term-care IV medication training program, an Association for Vascular Access (AVA) board member, and a board member for the National Coalition for IV Push Safety (NCIVPS).

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 2 CRNI® recertification units and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: May 17, 2026

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 04/26/2023

    Many high-acuity infusions are time and labor intensive, leading to poor patient adherence, treatment delays due to scheduling issues, and significant staff workload. As we continue to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic, scheduling these infusions can be even more difficult due to space restrictions. As many infusion centers around the nation face difficulties with scheduling, patient load, and nursing shortages, rapid infusion protocols can help to decrease the negative impact of these issues. In this session, a literature review and quality improvement project on rapid infusion protocols will be presented. Clinicians will explore key findings in research on rapid infusion protocols, including their impact on patient safety, nursing workload, and patient satisfaction. Further, we will discuss the results of an Ocrevus rapid infusion protocol project that was implemented in an outpatient infusion center. These findings and literature can assist clinicians in implementing rapid infusion protocols in a variety of infusion settings.

    Many high-acuity infusions are time and labor intensive, leading to poor patient adherence, treatment delays due to scheduling issues, and significant staff workload. As we continue to deal with the COVID-19 pandemic, scheduling these infusions can be even more difficult due to space restrictions. As many infusion centers around the nation face difficulties with scheduling, patient load, and nursing shortages, rapid infusion protocols can help to decrease the negative impact of these issues. In this session, a literature review and quality improvement project on rapid infusion protocols will be presented. Clinicians will explore key findings in research on rapid infusion protocols, including their impact on patient safety, nursing workload, and patient satisfaction. Further, we will discuss the results of an Ocrevus rapid infusion protocol project that was implemented in an outpatient infusion center. These findings and literature can assist clinicians in implementing rapid infusion protocols in a variety of infusion settings.

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, learners will be able to: 

    • Describe the potential negative impacts of high-acuity, long infusions on both clinicians and patients.
    • Identify three key themes found in literature on rapid infusion protocols.
    • Explain the quality improvement project presented, including methods of implementation and key findings.
    • Describe at least one way in which a rapid infusion protocol could improve an issue in the clinician’s practice setting.

     

    Courtney Brandt, DNP, APRN, FNP-C

    Courtney Brandt is a family nurse practitioner at Paragon Healthcare and a clinical assistant professor at Baylor University. She has five years of experience in infusion nursing as well as several years of experience in nursing education. Dr. Brandt has a passion for educating both her students and her patients and enjoys spending time ensuring her infusion patients understand their treatment and plan of care. She earned her master’s from Texas Tech University in 2017 and her doctorate from the University of Texas at Arlington in 2022. Her doctoral project on the implementation of an Ocrevus rapid infusion protocol was recently published in the Journal of Infusion Nursing. Dr. Brandt has also completed scholarly work in the area of simulation and the use of innovative technology in nursing education. She lives in Arlington, Texas with her husband and four young children.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 2 CRNI® recertification units and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: April 26, 2026

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.