Of the 40 recertification units (RUs) required for a CRNI® to recertify, at least 30 RUs must be obtained by attending any INS Meeting (live or online). Up to 10 RUs may be earned from the non INS Meeting category. The learning assets in this section have all been approved for RUs. Virtual Meetings and Conference Learning meet the INS Meeting criteria. Webinars meet the non INS Meeting criteria. All webinars are free to INS members.

CRNI® Recertification Approved

  • Types and Uses of Various SARS-CoV-19 Tests

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 10/07/2020 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    The novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-19) was first identified in Wuhan, China in December 2019. Since that time, it has rapidly spread across the globe. To help combat the epidemic, multiple testing techniques have been developed. Such technologies include molecular and diagnostic assays which detect active infection as well as antibody tests that may identify if a person has been previously exposed to the virus. In this webinar the process and science of the various testing strategies will be discussed as well as a look toward future testing techniques.

    The novel coronavirus (SARS-CoV-19) was first identified in Wuhan, China in December 2019. Since that time, it has rapidly spread across the globe.  To help combat the epidemic, multiple testing techniques have been developed.  Such technologies include molecular and diagnostic assays which detect active infection as well as antibody tests that may identify if a person has been previously exposed to the virus.  In this webinar the process and science of the various testing strategies will be discussed as well as a look toward future testing techniques.

    Learning Objectives:

    • Differentiate between diagnostic and antibody tests for SARS-CoV-19.
    • Describe the differences, pros, and cons between a nucleic acid and antigen diagnostic test.
    • Given a patient case, identify the best SARS-CoV-19 test to use.

    Stephanie James, PhD, MBA

    Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Science, Regis University School of Pharmacy

    Dr. Stephanie James is an Associate Professor of Pharmaceutical Science in the Regis University School of Pharmacy, where she teaches the immunology and infectious disease units.  She is also the current laboratory director of the Regis University Pharmacy testing lab where she processes and tests patient samples for coronavirus.  Dr. James earned her PhD in Biological Education from the University of Northern Colorado and completed a postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Colorado School of Medicine.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: October 7, 2023

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • What’s Bugging You? A Review of Antibiotic Infusion Therapy

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 09/23/2020

    Treatment of complicated infections with intravenous antibiotics has largely transitioned to the outpatient setting due to inpatient costs and improved patient satisfaction. Infusion nurses are crucial in the management of patient symptoms, antibiotic adverse effects, and appropriate monitoring in all settings. This webinar will cover the key components of antimicrobial selection and monitoring, including adverse effects. In addition, some new antimicrobial therapies will also be reviewed.

    Treatment of complicated infections with intravenous antibiotics has largely transitioned to the outpatient setting due to inpatient costs and improved patient satisfaction. Infusion nurses are crucial in the management of patient symptoms, antibiotic adverse effects, and appropriate monitoring in all settings. This webinar will cover the key components of antimicrobial selection and monitoring, including adverse effects. In addition, some new antimicrobial therapies will also be reviewed.

     

    Learning Objectives

    ·       Describe factors involved in antimicrobial selection for treatment of complicated infections including:

              o   Indication

              o   Antimicrobial spectrum

              o   Dosing considerations

    ·       Verbalize adverse effects and monitoring for commonly used antibiotic infusions

    ​Amber Streifel, PharmD

    Outpatient Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapist/OPAT pharmacist, Oregon Health & Science University

    Amber Streifel, PharmD is the Outpatient Parenteral Antimicrobial Therapist/OPAT pharmacist at Oregon Health & Science University. She earned her PharmD at the University of Maryland, Baltimore. She completed her PGY1 pharmacy residency at OHSU and her PGY2 in Infectious Diseases at the University of Colorado, Denver.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: September 23, 2023

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Utilizing Data to Inform Decision Making in a Pandemic and Shape Future Practices

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 08/12/2020

    The SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19 has disrupted life as we know it, including how we practice and deliver healthcare. During this unprecedented time, it is critical to utilize data to inform decision making and future practices. Data collection and analysis have critical roles in shaping programs, tracking progress, evaluating results, demonstrating accountability, and informing policies that will improve plans for future events. This presentation will take you through an historic journey covering several pandemics and will showcase how data collection and research significantly contributed to informed decision making. We will explore the importance of both qualitative and quantitative research, various data sources, and data reporting limitations, as well as opportunities to affect change during this pandemic and well into the future.

    The SARS-CoV-2 virus that causes COVID-19 has disrupted life as we know it, including how we practice and deliver healthcare. During this unprecedented time, it is critical to utilize data to inform decision making and future practices. Data collection and analysis have critical roles in shaping programs, tracking progress, evaluating results, demonstrating accountability, and informing policies that will improve plans for future events. This presentation will take you through an historic journey covering several pandemics and will showcase how data collection and research significantly contributed to informed decision making. We will explore the importance of both qualitative and quantitative research, various data sources, and data reporting limitations, as well as opportunities to affect change during this pandemic and well into the future.

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this webinar, learners will be able to: 

    •       Discuss the importance of data collection during a pandemic

    •       Review the importance of both qualitative and quantitative research.

    •       Explore how data drives informed decision-making.

    •       Review current COVID-19 data reporting limitations and opportunities.

    Buffy Lloyd-Krejci

    Founder, Lloyd-Krejci Consulting

    Founder Dr. Buffy Lloyd-Krejci has always had a passion for mitigating infectious diseases through a data-driven approach. Utilizing her degrees in Applied Mathematics and Bio-Medical Informatics, she participated in a national CDC and CMS pilot study supporting long-term care facilities in enrolling and reporting Clostridioides difficile infection into NHSN. Buffy realized how infections impact this vulnerable patient population with national estimates of 1-3 million infections leading to 380,000 deaths every year. Drawn to action to improve the infection prevention landscape, she founded Lloyd-Krejci Consulting.  

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: August 12, 2023

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Pandemic Perspectives: Placing COVID-19 in Historical Context

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 07/15/2020

    PANDEMIC: Prevalence in an entire country or the world. Historical records indicate infectious diseases have reached pandemic proportions throughout history, each affecting thousands, even millions of people across the globe. The coronavirus (COVID-19), now listed among other notorious diseases, has impacted 216 countries or territories and has infected more than 9 million people. This webinar presents COVID-19 within an historical context and includes a review of viral and bacterial infection and transmission.

    PANDEMIC: Prevalence in an entire country or the world. Historical records indicate infectious diseases have reached pandemic proportions throughout history, each affecting thousands, even millions of people across the globe. The coronavirus (COVID-19), now listed among other notorious diseases, has impacted 216 countries or territories and has infected more than 9 million people. This webinar presents COVID-19 within an historical context and includes a review of viral and bacterial infection and transmission. 

    Learning Outcomes:
    At the conclusion of this webinar, learners will be able to: 
    1) Recognize COVID-19 in relation to other notable pandemic diseases
    2) Describe the differences between viral and bacterial infection
    3) List common types of transmission and transmission prevention 

    Dawn Berndt, DNP, RN, CRNI®

    Clinical Education & Publications Manager, INS

    Dawn serves as INS’ Clinical Education and Publications Manager. She has been an active INS member and a CRNI® since 2005. She served on INS’ National Council on Education from 2011 to 2014 and on INS’ Board of Directors as a Director-at-Large from 2017 to 2018. Prior to joining the INS team, Dawn worked for 13 years as a clinical nurse specialist for infusion and as nurse manager of the infusion center, the venous access team, and the RN response team at the University of Wisconsin Health - University Hospital. Dawn holds a doctor of nursing practice in clinical leadership from the Henry Predolin School of Nursing at Edgewood College in Madison, Wisconsin; a master’s of nursing education from the University of Wisconsin School of Nursing; and a bachelor’s degree in nursing from the University of Phoenix in Phoenix.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: July 15, 2023

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

  • Biosimilars in Cancer Therapy and Beyond: Implications for Nursing Practice

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/17/2020

    This webinar will guide the participant through the brief history of biologics. We will explore the science and the advances that have been made since the first EMA-approved biosimilar, omnitropin, a recombinant human growth hormone with indications for pituitary dwarfism, Prader-Willi Syndrome, and Turner Syndrome, hit the EU market in 2006, as well as the first FDA-approved biosimilar, filgrastim-sndz hit the US market in 2015. A robust discussion on the progress of biosimilars in Europe and the US, relating to research and development, access, outcomes, cost savings, and nursing implications before, during, and after biosimilar administration are included in this webinar.

    Commerical Support: Coherus

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    Biosimilars are biologics, such as hormones and monoclonal antibodies, which are produced from living systems that may be sourced from nature or “genetically engineered,” AKA “biotech” products. A biosimilar is defined as a biologic product that is highly similar to and has no clinically meaningful differences from an existing FDA-approved reference biologic. Biologics have revolutionized the treatment and management of many malignant diseases, such as cancer. Biosimilars provide opportunities for improving healthcare access and outcomes, as well as reducing overall healthcare costs because of their cheaper price, relative to their reference biologics. 

    This webinar will guide the participant through the brief history of biologics. We will explore the science and the advances that have been made since the first EMA-approved biosimilar, omnitropin, a recombinant human growth hormone with indications for pituitary dwarfism, Prader-Willi Syndrome, and Turner Syndrome, hit the EU market in 2006, as well as the first FDA-approved biosimilar, filgrastim-sndz hit the US market in 2015. A robust discussion on the progress of biosimilars in Europe and the US, relating to research and development, access, outcomes, cost savings, and nursing implications before, during, and after biosimilar administration are included in this webinar.

    Learning Outcomes: At the conclusion of this webinar, learners will be able to:

    o Describe the history, science and advances in biosimilar development, analytical methods, and commercialization
    o Verbalize the step-wise approach for the development of biosimilars
    o Outline the nursing implications for interchangeability and substitution issues concerning biosimilars
    o Summarize the FDA-approved indications of biosimilars and the nursing roles before, during, and after their administrations 

    Joseph D. Tariman, PhD, RN, ANP-BC, FAAN

    Dr. Joseph D. Tariman, PhD, RN, ANP-BC, FAAN, is the editor and author of the only myeloma nursing textbooks (1st, 2nd, and the upcoming 3rd editions), author of eight myeloma book chapters, 18 conference abstracts, and 72 PubMed-indexed, peer-reviewed papers. He has given hundreds of presentations on topics affecting myeloma nursing practice, including the use of biosimilars, at local, regional, national and international conferences. He is currently an associate editor for the Clinical Journal of Oncology Nursing through June 2020.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: June 17, 2023

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • The Psychological Crisis of COVID-19 that too few are talking about: CLINICIANS AT RISK

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 06/10/2020

    INS and AVA are coming together to address an issue of profound importance to the infusion and vascular access communities. Healthcare workers are facing significant challenges in their professional and personal lives, due to COVID-19. These challenges may result in ongoing stress and evoke feelings of anxiety, sadness, hopelessness, guilt, and anger. This is matter of significance and urgency for clinicians. We are partnering with AVA to create awareness and promote dialogue about this issue within our community. We are offering this webinar at no cost to non-members and we encourage everyone to share in this opportunity. Join INS and AVA Directors of Clinical Education, Marlene Steinheiser and Judy Thompson, as they share experiences, include audience interaction, and use case studies to illustrate specific, practical interventions to minimize stress. They will also discuss the science that underpins current stressors.

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    INS and AVA are coming together to address an issue of profound importance to the infusion and vascular access communities. Healthcare workers are facing significant challenges in their professional and personal lives, due to COVID-19. These challenges may result in ongoing stress and evoke feelings of anxiety, sadness, hopelessness, guilt, and anger. This is matter of significance and urgency for clinicians. We are partnering with AVA to create awareness and promote dialogue about this issue within our community. We are offering this webinar at no cost to non-members and we encourage everyone to share in this opportunity.  

    Join INS and AVA Directors of Clinical Education, Marlene Steinheiser and Judy Thompson, as they share experiences, include audience interaction, and use case studies to illustrate specific, practical interventions to minimize stress. They will also discuss the science that underpins current stressors.

    Learning Outcomes: Upon completion of this webinar, the clinician will be able to:

    o Describe compassion fatigue, burnout, secondary traumatic stress, second victim and moral distress
    o Recognize common challenges and stressors related to the pandemic
    o Identify and implement at least one practical intervention to help reduce stress
    o List several resources from nationally recognized professional organizations


    Marlene Steinheiser, PhD, RN, CRNI®

    Director of Clinical Education, INS

    Marlene Steinheiser, PhD, RN, CRNI®, is the Director of Clinical Education for INS. In her role, she directs the development of educational programs and resources for INS and develops strategic alliances with other organizations. She earned her PhD in nursing at the University of Arizona, conducting research focusing on compassion fatigue among healthcare professionals. A nurse for more than 32 years, Dr. Steinheiser has had experience in acute care, home infusion, long-term care, regulatory organizations, and academic nursing.

    Judy Thompson, MSNED, RN, VA-BC

    Director of Clinical Education, AVA

    Judy Thompson, MSNED, RN, VA-BC, has been a vascular access vascular access specialist since 2004. She has experienced the joys and heartbreak of this craft, having advanced her practice to include insertion of all peripherally and centrally inserted catheters, as well as arterial devices. She is a founding member and president of her local Vascular Access Network and has served as president of AVA in 2017. She joined the AVA staff in 2018 as Director of Clinical Education.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: June 10, 2023

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    This course fulfills 1 credit towards VA-BCTM recertification.

  • Normalization of Deviance: Antithesis of Safety

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 05/06/2020

    Normalization of deviance was first described in 1969 in the context of NASA failure(s). Deviant behavior is a fundamental cause of serious safety events in healthcare today. Persistent non-compliance with rules and standards of care becomes the accepted norm and staff become unaware of the potential impact on patient safety, quality of care, and employee morale. This lesson on normalization of deviance is presented by a nurse with over 40 years of experience as a clinician, leader, and a consultant. Real-life examples will be shared and tactics for managing instances of deviance will be explored.

    Normalization of deviance was first described in 1969 in the context of NASA failure(s). Deviant behavior is a fundamental cause of serious safety events in healthcare today.  Persistent non-compliance with rules and standards of care becomes the accepted norm and staff become unaware of the potential impact on patient safety, quality of care, and employee morale. This lesson on normalization of deviance is presented by a nurse with over 40 years of experience as a clinician, leader, and a consultant. Real-life examples will be shared and tactics for managing instances of deviance will be explored.  

    Learning Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:

    o Contrast deviant behavior with innovation
    o Relate persistent deviance to the culture of safety
    o Describe 3 approaches for managing deviance

    ​Maureen Burger MSN, RN, CPHQ, FACHE

    Chief Nursing Officer, Visante Inc.

    Maureen Burger MSN, RN, CPHQ, FACHE, is the Chief Nursing Officer for Visante Inc., a medication management consulting firm. She has a long career in positions of progressive responsibility, both in nursing and hospital administration. Most recently, Maureen has served as Vice President of Quality, Safety, Risk, Accreditation, and Infection Control for Indiana University Health. As a consultant, she is thrilled to be able to focus her research, writing, and consulting on medication safety, especially when it involves IV push medications and drug diversion in healthcare. Ms. Burger obtained a master’s degree in Critical Care Nursing from Case Western Reserve University. She is certified in Healthcare Quality and is recognized as a Fellow by the American College of Healthcare Executives. When she is not advocating for patients and safety, Maureen, and her husband breed and race thoroughbred horses. Maureen lives in Indianapolis, IN. 

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: May 6, 2023

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

  • Adding Antimicrobial PICCs: Making the Case and Measuring the Outcomes

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 04/08/2020

    ​More than five million central vascular access devices (CVADs) are inserted in patients each year in the United States. It is estimated that at least 85% of hospitalized patients in the US receive intravenous medications to meet their therapeutic needs. Although CVADs provide a means by which patients receive life changing treatment, they can also pose a significant risk of complications, which may cause patients harm, increase morbidity, lengthen hospital stay, and add to health care costs. Infusion industry partners invest significantly in research and development of new technologies in order to develop CVADs that may help mitigate the risk of complications. Can the technological design of a central vascular access device significantly limit the incidence of central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI), catheter occlusion, fibrin sheath formation, and catheter-related thrombosis (CRT)? This presentation will focus on CVADs with antimicrobial and antithrombogenic protection. Specifically, catheters with chlorhexidine bonded to the internal and external catheter surfaces will be explored. At the conclusion of this session, learners will have increased understanding of the effects of central vascular access devices (CVADS) with bonded chlorhexidine.

    Commercial Support: Teleflex

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    More than five million central vascular access devices (CVADs) are inserted in patients each year in the United States. It is estimated that at least 85% of hospitalized patients in the US receive intravenous medications to meet their therapeutic needs. Although CVADs provide a means by which patients receive life changing treatment, they can also pose a significant risk of complications, which may cause patients harm, increase morbidity, lengthen hospital stay, and add to health care costs.

    Infusion industry partners invest significantly in research and development of new technologies in order to develop CVADs that may help mitigate the risk of complications. Can the technological design of a central vascular access device significantly limit the incidence of central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI), catheter occlusion, fibrin sheath formation, and catheter-related thrombosis (CRT)? 

    This presentation will focus on CVADs with antimicrobial and antithrombogenic protection. Specifically, catheters with chlorhexidine bonded to the internal and external catheter surfaces will be explored. At the conclusion of this session, learners will have increased understanding of the effects of central vascular access devices (CVADS) with bonded chlorhexidine. 

    Learning Outcome: At the conclusion of this session, learners will have increased understanding of the effects of central vascular access devices (CVADS) with bonded chlorhexidine. 

    ​Michelle DeVries, BS, MPH, CIC, VA-BC

    Senior Infection Control Officer, Methodist Hospitals

    Michelle DeVries, BS, MPH, CIC, VA-BC, has been involved in Infection Prevention for 25 years. With a background in Hospital and Molecular Epidemiology, her focus is at the intersection of vascular access, patient safety and infection prevention. Michelle serves on her local, as well as the National AVA boards and she is a former director with the Vascular Access Certification Board. Michelle is also an adjunct research fellow with AVATAR -- the Alliance for Vascular Access Teaching and Research. 

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: April 8, 2023

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

  • The Push for IV Medication Safety

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 03/11/2020

    This webinar will guide the participant through the brief history of IV push medication preparation and administration in acute care, as well as the risks inherent in dilution practices today. The presenter will discuss relevant research findings on IV push medication preparation and administration. Further, the practices associated with controlled substances that can increase the risk for drug diversion will be highlighted. The presentation includes real-life examples of deviant behaviors related to drug diversion in healthcare. Participants will receive real-world, practical tactics to limit dilution of IV push medications and solutions to help nurses confidently and safely give IV push medications, especially controlled substances, in the acute care setting.​

    Commercial Support: Fresenius Kabi

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    Intravenous (IV) medications are commonly used in both inpatient and outpatient environments. National survey results, nursing literature, and direct observation of nursing practice indicates that there is significant variation in the unit-based preparation of IV push medications, unsafe injection practices, and mishandling of controlled substances. The variations in IV medication practices, especially dose adjustment and waste of controlled substances, may increase the risk for drug diversion in the healthcare facility.

    This webinar will guide the participant through the brief history of IV push medication preparation and administration in acute care, as well as the risks inherent in dilution practices today. The presenter will discuss relevant research findings on IV push medication preparation and administration. Further, the practices associated with controlled substances that can increase the risk for drug diversion will be highlighted. The presentation includes real-life examples of deviant behaviors related to drug diversion in healthcare. Participants will receive real-world, practical tactics to limit dilution of IV push medications and solutions to help nurses confidently and safely give IV push medications, especially controlled substances, in the acute care setting.

    Learning Outcomes: At the conclusion of this webinar, learners will:

    o Recognize unsafe practices and at-risk behaviors associated with the preparation and
    administration of IV push medications to adults
    o Understand how at-risk behaviors handling injectable controlled substances can increase access and opportunity for drug diversion.

    ​Maureen Burger MSN, RN, CPHQ, FACHE

    Chief Nursing Officer, Visante Inc.

    Maureen Burger MSN, RN, CPHQ, FACHE, is the Chief Nursing Officer for Visante Inc., a medication management consulting firm. She has a long career in positions of progressive responsibility, both in nursing and hospital administration. Most recently, Maureen has served as Vice President of Quality, Safety, Risk, Accreditation, and Infection Control for Indiana University Health. As a consultant, she is thrilled to be able to focus her research, writing, and consulting on medication safety, especially when it involves IV push medications and drug diversion in healthcare. Ms. Burger obtained a master’s degree in Critical Care Nursing from Case Western Reserve University. She is certified in Healthcare Quality and is recognized as a Fellow by the American College of Healthcare Executives. When she is not advocating for patients and safety, Maureen, and her husband breed and race thoroughbred horses. Maureen lives in Indianapolis, IN. 

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: March 11, 2023

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

  • Infusion Reactions: Building Familiarity with the Language

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 02/12/2020

    The availability of and indications for immunotherapies continue to grow. These fast-moving developments have necessitated heightened attention to the importance of education, regarding key components of the endogenous immune system, as well as accurate definitions for commonly used terms. This is so that appropriate acute resuscitation and future treatment decisions may be made, improving outcomes for our patients. Further, this serves to increase confidence in decision making by the clinician at the bedside, regardless of degree or title. Pulling from multidisciplinary work, this presentation combines lessons learned and specific training from emergency, critical care, and oncology nursing specialties.

    The availability of and indications for immunotherapies continue to grow. These fast-moving developments have necessitated heightened attention to the importance of education, regarding key components of the endogenous immune system, as well as accurate definitions for commonly used terms. This is so that appropriate acute resuscitation and future treatment decisions may be made, improving outcomes for our patients. Further, this serves to increase confidence in decision making by the clinician at the bedside, regardless of degree or title.  Pulling from multidisciplinary work, this presentation combines lessons learned and specific training from emergency, critical care, and oncology nursing specialties.

    Learning Outcome: At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:
    o Discuss relevant components of the immune system and appropriate resuscitation measures for infusion reactions
    o Reiterate the importance of accurate, timely record keeping and multidisciplinary communication regarding onset, timing, nature, and specifics of infusion reactions

    Abigail Zuehlke, BSN, CRNI®

    Abigail Zuehlke, BSN, CRNI®, has considerable clinical experience in oncology, critical care, and emergency nursing. She has varied practice-setting experiences with fluid and electrolyte challenges, across the spectrum of illness, organic and iatrogenic. Abigail has a passion for quality improvement and meaningful solutions for hardworking bedside clinicians and their patients.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: February 12, 2023

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.