Of the 40 recertification units (RUs) required for a CRNI® to recertify, at least 30 RUs must be obtained by attending any INS Meeting (live or online). Up to 10 RUs may be earned from the non INS Meeting category. The learning assets in this section have all been approved for RUs. Virtual Meetings and Conference Learning meet the INS Meeting criteria. Webinars meet the non INS Meeting criteria. All webinars are free to INS members.

CRNI® Recertification Approved

  • Health Care of the Future: How Nurses Can Fix the Hospital

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered Includes a Live Event on 06/19/2019 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    In this era of rapid change in health care, nurses must become aware of the opportunities available to contribute. By examining not only nursing’s past, but also its future, various methods emerge that add the all-important nursing voice to the evolution of health care. In addition, examining the National Academy of Medicine’s report and update on the Future of Nursing 2030 suggests further opportunities to contribute. Included in this presentation is a discussion of technology as it contributes to advances in care.

    In this era of rapid change in health care, nurses must become aware of the opportunities available to contribute. By examining not only nursing’s past, but also its future, various methods emerge that add the all-important nursing voice to the evolution of health care. In addition, examining the National Academy of Medicine’s report and update on the Future of Nursing 2030 suggests further opportunities to contribute. Included in this presentation is a discussion of technology as it contributes to advances in care.

    Learning Outcomes: At the end of this presentation the participant will be able to:
    • Describe the role of the registered nurse in the future
    • Describe the Institute of Medicine’s recommendations as they pertain to the nurses’ role
    • Understand strategic practices for developing the nursing role

    Adele Webb, PhD, RN, FNAP, FAAN

    Assistant Dean, Capella University

    Adele Webb, PhD, RN, FNAP, FAAN, is an assistant dean at Capella University. Her focus is on international nurse capacity development as it relates to both communicable and non-communicable diseases. She has received extensive funding for her international work and has published her findings in several refereed journals. Adele has contributed to World Health Organization guidelines, testified to the Institute of Medicine, and given testimony to the White House on nursing workforce issues. She continues to collaborate with the WHO as well as the World NCD Congress, and these efforts have helped contribute to improved nurse capacity in health care systems across 43 countries.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: June 19, 2022

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • Short Peripheral Intravenous Access: A Risk/Benefit Analysis

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered Recorded On: 05/08/2019

    As the most common procedure performed in the acute care setting, insertion of the short peripheral intravenous (IV) catheter is a basic nursing skill. It is, however, far from benign. There is a lack of standardized education and competency assessment in this foundational skill. In addition, a lack of validated assessment tools has hindered accurate evaluation of the patient harm caused by complications such as infiltration, extravasation, phlebitis, and infection. This presentation will provide an overview and respond to audience questions regarding the use of short peripheral IV access and its role in the current standard of practice, the potential complications that arise with use, and strategies to optimize outcomes in the management of short peripheral IV access.

    As the most common procedure performed in the acute care setting, insertion of the short peripheral intravenous (IV) catheter is a basic nursing skill. It is, however, far from benign. There is a lack of standardized education and competency assessment in this foundational skill. In addition, a lack of validated assessment tools has hindered accurate evaluation of the patient harm caused by complications such as infiltration, extravasation, phlebitis, and infection. This presentation will provide an overview and respond to audience questions regarding the use of short peripheral IV access and its role in the current standard of practice, the potential complications that arise with use, and strategies to optimize outcomes in the management of short peripheral IV access.

    Learning Outcomes: At the conclusion of the webinar, the participant will be able to:
    • Identify two complications of short peripheral catheter access that may cause patient harm
    • Describe two evidence-based strategies to optimize outcomes in short peripheral catheter management

    Lisa Gorski, MS, RN, HHCNS-BC, CRNI®, FAAN

    Wheaton Franciscan Home Health & Hospice

    Lisa Gorski, MS, RN, HHCNS-BC, CRNI®, FAAN, is a clinical nurse specialist at Wheaton Franciscan Home Health and Hospice, a part of Ascension Health at Home. A fellow of the American Academy of Nursing, she has authored several books on infusion therapy, as well as more than 50 journal articles and book chapters. Ms. Gorski is chair of Infusion Nurses Society’s Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice Committee.

    Barb Nickel, APRN-CNS, NP-C, CRNI®, CCRN

    Clinical Nurse Specialist

    Barb Nickel, APRN-CNS, NP-C, CRNI®, CCRN, has extensive experience in the application of evidence-based guidelines relevant to infusion therapy practice. As a clinical nurse specialist, she is actively involved in infusion-related process improvement at the facility and statewide level, regarding topics such as CLABSI prevention, new graduate training, and smart pump drug library standardization. From 2011 to 2016, Ms. Nickel was a member, then chair/lead nurse-planner for INS’ National Council on Education. She was also a reviewer for both the 2011 and the 2016 Infusion Nursing Standards of Practice.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: May 8, 2022

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • Non-suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI): Adolescent Truths

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered Recorded On: 04/10/2019

    Non-suicidal self-injury is behavior with intent to inflict short-term physical pain rather than deal with emotional pain. Not only is this phenomenon increasing, but clinicians still lack understanding regarding why individuals partake in this behavior. Although counter-intuitive, those who self-harm attempt to replace their emotional pain with physical pain. This presentation is intended to stimulate thought in those who provide assessment and treatment of the adolescent population, primarily in those with emotional disorders. A short case study and discussion of best practice will be discussed.

    Non-suicidal self-injury is behavior with intent to inflict short-term physical pain rather than deal with emotional pain. Not only is this phenomenon increasing, but clinicians still lack understanding regarding why individuals partake in this behavior. Although counter-intuitive, those who self-harm attempt to replace their emotional pain with physical pain. This presentation is intended to stimulate thought in those who provide assessment and treatment of the adolescent population, primarily in those with emotional disorders. A short case study and discussion of best practice will be discussed.

    Learning Outcomes:
    At the end of this educational activity, learners will be able to:
    • Describe what NSSI is and what it is not
    • Describe how NSSI has changed since first identified in 1993
    • Determine who it affects
    • Understand how NSSI is portrayed in or propagated by media
    • Communicate what can be done to reduce this phenomenon 

    Renee Bauer, PhD, MS, RN

    Indiana State University

    Renee Bauer, PhD, MS, RN, is an associate professor at Indiana State University. Dr. Bauer teaches classes that encompass assessment to medical-surgical nursing and has been the director of second degree students for the past 8 years. She has more than 25 years of experience as a nurse (primarily in a psychiatric setting), and her work has been published by more than 25 publications. She is an officer of Sigma Theta Tau honor society, and a member of other organizations such as the National League of Nursing and the Indiana State Board of Nursing. She is currently pursuing a certificate to become a psychiatric nurse practitioner.

    Disclosure: There is no conflict of interest for anyone with the ability to control content of the activity. No conflict of interest to report

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: April 10, 2022

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • Sepsis Management

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered Recorded On: 03/13/2019

    Sepsis is a medical emergency that may include long-term health and social consequences for the affected individuals and their families. In recent years, health care professionals have made great strides in understanding the pathophysiology of sepsis which have led to earlier diagnosis and improved patient outcomes. This webinar will discuss the most recent changes in early detection methods and the new tools available for physicians and nurses that help identify the symptoms of sepsis sooner.

    Sepsis is a medical emergency that may include long-term health and social consequences for the affected individuals and their families. In recent years, health care professionals have made great strides in understanding the pathophysiology of sepsis which have led to earlier diagnosis and improved patient outcomes. This webinar will discuss the most recent changes in early detection methods and the new tools available for physicians and nurses that help identify the symptoms of sepsis sooner.

    Learning Outcomes:
    At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:
    1) Define sepsis and septic shock
    2) Recognize the importance of early identification of patients with sepsis
    3) Discuss best practices for treating sepsis

    Emily Cannon, DNP, MS, BS, RN

    Indiana State University

    Emily Cannon, DNP, MS, BS, RN, is an instructor in the baccalaureate nursing program at Indiana State University since 2012, where she teaches medical-surgical nursing. From 2003 to 2012, she was a member of the nursing faculty at Ivy Technical Community College. Prior to that role, she was a medical-surgical float nurse and an infection control practitioner at Union Hospital in Terre Haute, Indiana. Emily earned an associate of science degree in nursing from Vincennes University in 1995 and went on to complete a bachelor of science degree and a master’s degree in nursing from Indiana Wesleyan University. In May 2015, she completed a doctoral program in nursing practice at Indiana State University.

    Disclosure: There is no conflict of interest for anyone with the ability to control content of the activity. No conflict of interest to report

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: March 13, 2022

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • Virtual Conference: Strong Nurses, Strong Practice

    Contains 3 Component(s), 5 credits offered

    Caring for the caregiver is often a discounted aspect of health care. Nurses pour out their compassion, strength, abilities, and expertise on behalf of their patients, yet often, their own personal health and well-being is neglected. This focus track is dedicated to building strong nurses and strong practice. This entire program has been approved for 5 contact hours and 10 CRNI® RUs and meets the INS Meeting criteria.

    STRONG NURSES, STRONG PRACTICE

    Caring for the caregiver is often a discounted aspect of health care. Nurses pour out their compassion, strength, abilities, and expertise on behalf of their patients, yet often, their own personal health and well-being is neglected. This focus track is dedicated to building strong nurses and strong practice.

    Championing Workplace Civility

    8:00 - 9:00 AM EDT
    • Understanding why horizontal violence exists
    • Steps that need to be taken in order to change the status quo
    • Applying the describe, express, specify, and consequences (DESC) model to strengthen civility in the workplace

    Compassion Fatigue and Burnout: Understanding the Differences and Managing the Consequences

    9:00 - 10:00 AM EDT
    • Development of a nurse-patient therapeutic relationship may put nurses at risk for compassion fatigue
    • Cumulative stress related to the work environment can contribute to burnout
    • Explore strategies to recognize and manage the symptoms of compassion fatigue and burnout and mitigate the risks 

    Substance Use Disorder in Nursing

    10:30 - 11:30 AM EDT
    • Substance use disorder (SUD) is a complex disease with many serious consequences
    • Health care workers are not immune, and SUD is especially challenging in the nursing profession
    • This session will describe SUD, identify the symptoms, and discuss the nurse’s obligation to act if SUD is suspected in a colleague

    It's Time for YOU: The Healthy Infusion Nurse

    11:30 AM - 12:30 PM EDT
    • Take a moment to think about taking better care of yourself and getting healthy
    • Attendees will learn about mind-body interventions including the power of gratitude, meditation, grounding, mindfulness, and breathing

    Healthy Nurse, Healthy Nation

    1:00 - 2:00 PM EDT
    • American Nurses Association’s (ANA’s) “Healthy Risk Appraisal,” led to the Healthy Nurse, Healthy Nation (HNHN) initiative.
    • This session will discuss the key areas of nurse well-being including rest, nutrition, physical activity, quality of life, and safety and how to implement them into practice
    Contact Hours

    This entire program has been approved for 5 contact hours. Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: May 21, 2022

    CRNI® Recertification Units

    This entire program has been approved for 10 CRNI® recertification units and meets the INS Meeting criteria.

    *Note: Participants who attend the live version of this program at INS 2019 in Baltimore, MD are not eligible to receive contact hours or CRNI® recertification units through this online program.

    Championing Workplace Civility

    Arna Robins, MSN, RN, CEN, CFRN, NREMT
    8:00 - 9:00 AM EDT

    Although nurses enter the profession to help others, many times nurses are not helpful to one another. All nurses must understand why horizontal violence exists and what steps need to be taken to change the status quo. This session will define and describe different types of horizontal violence and discuss the reasons for its occurrence. Using the describe, express, specify, and consequences (DESC) model, attendees will learn how to have difficult conversations with colleagues in an effort to strengthen civility in the workplace.

    Learning Outcomes: After the session, attendees will be able to describe horizontal violence and discuss strategies for having difficult conversations.


    Compassion Fatigue and Burnout: Understanding the Differences and Managing the Consequences

    Deborah Boyle, MSN, RN, AOCNS®, FAAN
    Marlene Steinheiser, PhD, RN, CRNI®
    9:00 - 10:00 AM EDT

    When developing a nurse-patient therapeutic relationship, a nurse’s proclivity for empathy may put them at risk for compassion fatigue. Cumulative stress related to the work environment can contribute to burnout. Although compassion fatigue and burnout have similarities in etiologies, triggers, and symptoms, they differ in several ways. This session will explore strategies on how to recognize and  manage the symptoms of both situations, understand the similarities and differences, and how to mitigate the risks.

    Learning Outcomes: After the session, attendees will be able to describe the similarities and differences between compassion fatigue and burnout, and verbalize potential strategies to manage both.


    Substance Use Disorder in Nursing

    Suzanne Alunni-Kinkle, MSN, RN, CARN
    10:30 - 11:30 AM EDT

    Substance use disorder (SUD) is a complex disease with many serious consequences. SUD can range in severity from substance misuse to substance dependency. Health care workers are not immune, and SUD is especially challenging in the nursing profession. This disorder affects as many as 1 in 10 nurses, many of whom are not identified and may continue to practice, potentially endangering the lives of patients. This session will describe SUD, identify the symptoms, and discuss the nurse’s obligation to act if SUD is suspected in a colleague.

    Learning Outcomes: After the session, attendees will be able to identify behavioral and physical changes that occur with SUD and will understand steps to take if SUD is suspected.


    It's Time for YOU: The Healthy Infusion Nurse

    Melissa Harker, MSN, RN-BC
    Sara Scheller, BSN, RN, CCRN, NBC-HWC
    11:30 AM - 12:30 PM EDT

    When was the last time you took a moment to think about taking better care of yourself and getting healthy? In this mind-body connection session, attendees will learn about mind-body interventions, including the power of gratitude, meditation, grounding, mindfulness, and breathing.

    Learning Outcome: After the session, attendees will be able to describe mind-body strategies that foster health and wellness.


    Healthy  Nurse, Healthy Nation

    Holly Carpenter, BSN, RN
    1:00 - 2:00 PM EDT

    Many nurses in the United States are overweight, do not get enough sleep, do not eat the recommended daily amount of fruits and vegetables, and have high workplace stress. In recognition of this alarming data from the American Nurses Association’s (ANA’s) “Healthy Risk Appraisal,” ANA created the Healthy Nurse, Healthy Nation (HNHN) initiative. This session will discuss the key areas of nurse well-being including rest, nutrition, physical activity, quality of life, and safety, along with strategies for implementation in practice.

    Learning Outcomes: After the session, attendees will be able to discuss the HNHN initiative and make a commitment to improve their own health and wellness.


    Contact Hours

    This entire program has been approved for 5 contact hours.

     Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: May 21, 2022


    CRNI® Recertification Units

    This entire program has been approved for 10 CRNI® recertification units and meets the INS Meeting criteria.

    *Note: Participants who attend the live version of this program at INS 2019 in Baltimore, MD are not eligible to receive contact hours or CRNI® recertification units through this online program.

    Arna Robins, MSN, RN, CEN, CFRN, NREMT

    PeaceHealth

    Arna K. Robins, MSN, RN, CEN, CFRN, NREMT, was a pediatric/neonatal flight nurse in the Southwest, before returning to the Pacific Northwest in 2012, where she is a house supervisor at Peace Island Medical Center in Friday Harbor, Washington. She obtained an MSN from Grand Canyon University in Phoenix and a BSN from Azusa Pacific University in Azua, California, and she is a coauthor of the book The Dauntless Nurse: Communications Confidence Builder.

    Deborah Boyle, MSN, RN, AOCNS®, FAAN

    Advanced Oncology Nursing Resources

    Deborah Boyle, MSN, RN, AOCNS®, FAAN, is a certified advanced oncology clinical nurse specialist who has practiced for more than 4 decades. She has been the recipient of numerous honors from the Oncology Nursing Society, and in 1999, she was inducted into the American Academy of Nursing. Debi has delivered many lectures in the United States and abroad, and is the author of more than 300 publications and 4 books.

    Marlene Steinheiser, PhD, RN, CRNI®

    Infusion Nurses Society

    Marlene Steinheiser, PhD, RN, CRNI®,  is the Infusion Nurses Society's director of nursing education. Dr. Steinheiser has more than 30 years of nursing experience in acute care, home infusion/home care, long-term care, education, and regulatory environments. Her research interest is compassion fatigue and its effects on nurses, patients, and organizations. Dr. Steinheiser's most recent research on compassion fatigue among nurses in skilled nursing facilities has been supported by grants from the University of Arizona and Sigma Theta Tau.

    Suzanne Alunni-Kinkle, MSN, RN, CARN

    FSSolutions

    Suzanne Alunni-Kinkle, MSN, RN, CARN, has more than 29 years of experience in substance use disorder treatment and prevention. Currently, she is director of business  development–recovery management solutions for FSSolutions, an administrator of professional health monitoring services. Previously, she was chief nursing director of the Intervention Project for Nurses of the Florida Nurses Association and director of the New Jersey State Nurses Association's recovery and monitoring program. She serves on the executive of board of directors for the International Nurses Society of Addictions and the board of directors of the National Organization of Alternative Programs. Ms. Alunni-Kinkle is a member of the American Nurses Association and the Florida Nurses Association.

    Melissa Harker, MSN, RN-BC

    Hackensack Meridian Health

    Melissa Harker, MSN, RN-BC, is the manager of education for integrative health and medicine at Hackensack Meridian Health. She holds a master's degree in nursing education and a national certification in gerontology. Currently working on a doctoral degree with a focus on nursing leadership, she also has studied at the BirchTree Center of Healthcare Transformation and is a graduate of the Integrative Healing Arts Academy. Ms. Harker is a visiting professor at several universities and a published writer.

    Sara Scheller, BSN, RN, CCRN, NBC-HWC

    Hackensack Meridian Health

    Sara Scheller, BSN, RN, CCRN, NBC-HWC, is a nationally board-certified  health and wellness coach and an integrative nurse health coach for the integrative health and medicine program at Hackensack Meridian Health in New Jersey. Ms. Scheller received a BSN from Stockton University in Galloway Township in New Jersey and has trained at the Institute for Integrative Nutrition, the HeartMath Institute, and the Birch Tree Center for Healthcare Transformation. She is also an active member of the American Holistic Nurses Association and a system-wide health and wellness nursing council.

    Holly Carpenter, BSN, RN

    American Nurses Association

    Holly Carpenter, BSN, RN, is the senior policy advisor for the American Nurses Association’s (ANA) Nursing Practice and Work Environment and Innovation departments. Her responsibilities include ANA's Healthy Nurse, Healthy Nation initiatives, such as the Grand Challenge; resources and continuing education programs; and supporting work environment issues. Before joining the ANA, she was worked for the Maryland Nurses Association and the state of Maryland’s Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.

  • Short Peripheral Catheter Infiltration: Minimizing Risks to Improve Outcomes

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered Recorded On: 02/13/2019

    Hospitalized patients receiving medications or fluids via short peripheral catheters (SPCs) are at risk for infiltration. Infiltration can increase patient length of stay, result in repeated vascular access procedures, increase costs by use of supplies and nursing time, lead to short-term and long-term patient harm, and decrease patient satisfaction. Early detection of infiltration can minimize risks by prompt intervention. Quality improvement projects have been directed toward staff education on SPC insertion, maintenance, assessment, and monitoring. This webinar will discuss current research and practice initiatives, as well as the benefits of emerging technology aimed at reducing infiltration.

    Commercial Support: ivWatch

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    Hospitalized patients receiving medications or fluids via short peripheral catheters (SPCs) are at risk for infiltration. Infiltration can increase patient length of stay, result in repeated vascular access procedures, increase costs by use of supplies and nursing time, lead to short-term and long-term patient harm, and decrease patient satisfaction. Early detection of infiltration can minimize risks by prompt intervention. Quality improvement projects have been directed toward staff education on SPC insertion, maintenance, assessment, and monitoring. This webinar will discuss current research and practice initiatives, as well as the benefits of emerging technology aimed at reducing infiltration.

    Learning Outcomes:
    At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
    1. Identify risk factors associated with SPC infiltration
    2. Describe the benefits of early and ongoing assessment to detect infiltration 

    Gregory Schears, MD

    Mayo Clinic

    Gregory J. Schears, MD, is a pediatric intensivist and anesthesiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. He has had a long-standing interest in reducing patient complications and improving the approach to vascular access. He is a consultant to the department of anesthesiology and the division of pediatric critical care medicine, the physician liaison to the nurse-led peripherally inserted central catheter team, and is also the comedical director of the cardiovascular pediatric surgical intensive care unit. An associate  professor of anesthesiology, Dr. Schears has presented locally, regionally, nationally, and internationally.

    Disclosure: ivWatch; Consultant Fee; COI resolved

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: February 13, 2022

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • Bleeding Disorders: Management of Pediatric Patients

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered Recorded On: 01/16/2019

    Bleeding disorders are rare and complex, and to some nurses, frightening. The information in this presentation is designed to introduce and discuss the management of pediatric patients with a bleeding disorder. Infusion nurses are key to high-quality care in the home setting. Therefore, bleeding disorder-specific education is critical in the implementation and delivery of excellent nursing care. During this presentation, participants will explore the classifications of bleeding disorders, review laboratory tests necessary for diagnosing a bleeding disorder, and discuss current and emerging treatment options, as well as complications associated with bleeding disorders.

    Bleeding disorders are rare and complex, and to some nurses, frightening. The information in this presentation is designed to introduce and discuss the management of pediatric patients with a bleeding disorder. Infusion nurses are key to high-quality care in the home setting. Therefore, bleeding disorder-specific education is critical in the implementation and delivery of excellent nursing care. During this presentation, participants will explore the classifications of bleeding disorders, review laboratory tests necessary for diagnosing a bleeding disorder, and discuss current and emerging treatment options, as well as complications associated with bleeding disorders. 

    Learning Outcomes: 
    At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
    • Describe the classifications of hemophilia A, hemophilia B, and von Willebrand disease (VWD).
    • Recall the types of screening for hemophilia A, B, and vWD.
    • Discuss the treatment for hemophilia A, hemophilia B, and vWD.
    • Recognize signs and symptoms of complications in pediatric patients with a bleeding disorder.

    Ashley Smith, MSN, RN, CRNI®

    Nurse Specialist, Bleeding Disorders

    Ashley Smith, MSN, RN, CRNI®, is a nurse specialist in bleeding disorder therapies at Paragon Healthcare Specialty. Before her career in specialty pharmacy, Mrs. Smith spent many years caring for pediatric and adult patients in the emergency department. She has also worked in cardiology, general medicine, and outpatient surgery. She earned a bachelor’s degree from Jacksonville State University and an MSN in nursing education from the University of North Alabama. She is a member of the Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing, now known as Sigma. 

    Disclosure: This educational activity does not promote this entity or the products thereof. There is no conflict of interest for anyone with the ability to control content for this activity except Ashley Smith, MSN, RN, CRNI® is employed by Paragon Healthcare, Inc., a specialty pharmacy that services hemophilia patients. Conflict of interest resolved.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: January 16, 2022

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • Infusion Therapy in Alternative Care Settings

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered Recorded On: 12/12/2018

    Administering infusion therapy in alternative care settings requires expert planning and management. Infusion nurses must be knowledgeable when providing care for patients in home, hospice, and other non-acute facilities. This webinar will address best practices for attaining and maintaining vascular access, administration of infusion therapy, and safety and infection control in alternative care settings.

    Administering infusion therapy in alternative care settings requires expert planning and management. Infusion nurses must be knowledgeable when providing care for patients in home, hospice, and other non-acute facilities. This webinar will address best practices for attaining and maintaining vascular access, administration of infusion therapy, and safety and infection control in alternative care settings. 

    Learning Outcomes:
    At the conclusion of this webinar, attendees will:
    a) be able to describe best practices for attaining and maintaining vascular access in alternate care settings and 
    b) identify safety and infection control practices for alternative care settings. 

    Jan Elliott, BS, RN, CRNI®, VA-BC

    Infusion Therapy and Vascular Access Specialist

    Jan Elliott, BS, RN, CRNI®, VA-BC, is an infusion therapy and vascular access specialist, and the primary hospice and palliative care on-call nurse for Upstate Homecare in Central New York. Throughout her 24-year career, Jan has administered infusion therapy, developed vascular access teams, and provided education for clinicians on pain management in the home, alternative, and acute care settings. She has also worked for various US medical device companies as a clinical specialist, preceptor, and educator. In those roles, Jan helped implement conversions on new technologies, products, and services with a focus on promoting and ensuring safer, effective, and efficient delivery of patient care. Jan has been president of the Association of Vascular Access of Central New York for the past 10 years, and has hosted a teaching day symposium for all health care disciplines with discussions on best practices, innovations, and evidence-based medicine. 

    Disclosure:There is no conflict of interest for anyone with the ability to control content for this activity except Jan Elliott who is a clinical nurse educator for Genentech. Conflict resolved.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: December 12, 2021

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • CAR T-Cells: Treatment Overview, Toxicity Management, and Administration Considerations

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered Recorded On: 11/14/2018

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells are cellular immunotherapies used for the treatment of some malignancies. This adoptive cell therapy represents a new paradigm in cancer treatment, one in which the patient’s own immune system, specifically T-cells, are engineered to treat his or her cancer. CAR T-cell therapy is a complex treatment associated with unique and serious toxicities, making education a necessity for both the patient and the health care provider. This presentation will provide an overview of CAR T-cell therapy, toxicity assessment and management strategies, administration considerations, and patient education needs for the health care provider.

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells are cellular immunotherapies used for the treatment of some malignancies. This adoptive cell therapy represents a new paradigm in cancer treatment, one in which the patient’s own immune system, specifically T-cells, are engineered to treat his or her cancer. CAR T-cell therapy is a complex treatment associated with unique and serious toxicities, making education a necessity for both the patient and the health care provider. This presentation will provide an overview of CAR T-cell therapy, toxicity assessment and management strategies, administration considerations, and patient education needs for the health care provider.  

    Learning Outcomes: At the conclusion of this presentation, learners will be able to:
    • Describe the mechanism of action for CAR T-cells
    • Identify 3 common toxicities associated with CAR T-cells, as well as associated management strategies 
    • Verbalize administration considerations for CAR T-cell products

    Karen Anderson, MN, RN, AOCNS, BMTCN, CRNI®

    Infusion Manager

    Karen Anderson, MN, RN, AOCNS, BMTCN, CRNI®, is an infusion manager at the Banner University of Arizona Cancer Center in Tucson, Arizona. Previously, she was the clinical operations manager at the Bezos Family Immunotherapy Clinic at the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, a clinic dedicated to supporting scientific advances in cellular immunotherapies and affiliated with the Fred Hutchison Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington. Her professional background includes roles in inpatient and ambulatory settings as a staff nurse, research nurse, and an oncology clinical nurse specialist. Ms. Anderson is currently a PhD student in nursing at the University of Arizona. 

    Disclosure: Kite Pharma- A Gilead Company; Consultant Fee; COI resolved

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: November 14, 2021

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.



    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.



  • Burnout in the Workplace: Putting the Me Back in TiMe

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered Recorded On: 11/03/2018

    After the session, attendees will be able to apply the techniques described in this session to daily practice and to describe techniques to prevent burnout.

    Nursing burnout is defined as physical, mental, and emotional exhaustion. Over time, it can lead to dulled emotions and disengagement from family, friends, coworkers, and patients. The National Institutes of Health has found that hospitals with a high rate of employee burnout tend to have lower patient satisfaction rates. Burnout also has been linked to increased infection rates. The combination of long shifts, stressful situations, dealing with sickness and death, and putting others first are likely causes of nursing burnout. Why does this happen and how can we fix it? This session will discuss the causes of burnout and how we can stay grounded by taking time for ourselves.

    Learning Outcomes 

    After the session, attendees will be able to apply the techniques described in this session to daily practice and to describe techniques to prevent burnout.

    ​Diane Frndak, PHD, MBA, CAPP

    Robert Morris University

    Diane C. Frndak, PHD, MBA, CAPP, is an assistant professor in the Robert Morris University's health service administration program in its School of Nursing and Health Sciences. She has worked in health care administration, with a focus on organizational excellence, patient safety, and quality. She is especially passionate about helping individuals thrive, in particular health care workers.

    Disclosure: No conflict of interest to disclose

    CRNI® RUs: 2                                                                        
    This entire program has been approved for 2 CRNI® recertification units and meets the INS Meeting criteria.                                                                  
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS National Academy 2018 in Washington, DC are not eligible to receive CRNI® recertification units through this online program.

    Contact Hours: 1       
    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.                                                           
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS National Academy 2018 in Washington, DC are not eligible to receive contact hours through this online program.


    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: November 3, 2021

    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.