Of the 40 recertification units (RUs) required for a CRNI® to recertify, at least 30 RUs must be obtained by attending any INS Meeting (live or online). Up to 10 RUs may be earned from the non INS Meeting category. The learning assets in this section have all been approved for RUs. Virtual Meetings and Conference Learning meet the INS Meeting criteria. Webinars meet the non INS Meeting criteria. All webinars are free to INS members.

CRNI® Recertification Approved

  • Infusion Reactions: Building Familiarity with the Language

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 02/12/2020 at 1:00 PM (EST)

    The availability of and indications for immunotherapies continue to grow. These fast-moving developments have necessitated heightened attention to the importance of education, regarding key components of the endogenous immune system, as well as accurate definitions for commonly used terms. This is so that appropriate acute resuscitation and future treatment decisions may be made, improving outcomes for our patients. Further, this serves to increase confidence in decision making by the clinician at the bedside, regardless of degree or title. Pulling from multidisciplinary work, this presentation combines lessons learned and specific training from emergency, critical care, and oncology nursing specialties.

    The availability of and indications for immunotherapies continue to grow. These fast-moving developments have necessitated heightened attention to the importance of education, regarding key components of the endogenous immune system, as well as accurate definitions for commonly used terms. This is so that appropriate acute resuscitation and future treatment decisions may be made, improving outcomes for our patients. Further, this serves to increase confidence in decision making by the clinician at the bedside, regardless of degree or title.  Pulling from multidisciplinary work, this presentation combines lessons learned and specific training from emergency, critical care, and oncology nursing specialties.

    Learning Outcome: At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:
    o Discuss relevant components of the immune system and appropriate resuscitation measures for infusion reactions
    o Reiterate the importance of accurate, timely record keeping and multidisciplinary communication regarding onset, timing, nature, and specifics of infusion reactions

    Abigail Zuehlke, BSN, CRNI®

    RN, Martha Jefferson Hospital

    Abigail Zuehlke, BSN, CRNI®, has considerable clinical experience in oncology, critical care, and emergency nursing. A dedicated, lifelong learner, she is currently pursuing her Adult Gerontology Acute Care Nurse Practitioner Master of Science in Nursing from the University of Virginia. She will always be an infusion nurse at heart, with a passion for quality improvement and meaningful solutions for hardworking bedside clinicians and their patients.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: February 12, 2023

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • Platelet Disorders and Platelet Transfusion Best Practice

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 01/15/2020

    Thrombocytopenia is most commonly caused by diseases of platelet destruction. These diseases may be the result of immune or non-immune conditions. All conditions of platelet destruction, resulting in abnormally low platelet count, can be life-threatening. This session will discuss diseases of platelet destruction, intervention, and best practice for platelet transfusion.

    Thrombocytopenia is most commonly caused by diseases of platelet destruction. These diseases may be the result of immune or non-immune conditions. All conditions of platelet destruction, resulting in abnormally low platelet count, can be life-threatening. This session will discuss diseases of platelet destruction, intervention, and best practice for platelet transfusion.

    Learning Outcome: After the session, attendees will contrast immune vs non-immune diseases of platelet destruction, Platelet Disorders and Platelet Transfusion Best Practice  

    Brenda Shelton, DNP, RN, APRN-CNS, CCRN, AOCN

    Clinical Nurse Specialist, Sidney Kimmel Comprehensive Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins

    Brenda Shelton, DNP, RN, APRN-CNS, CCRN, AOCN, has 40 years of critical care and oncology experience and has widely presented and published in these specialty practices. She is an active leader in the Oncology Nursing Society and also serves as an Intermittent Joint Commission International Nurse Surveyor. She is currently a clinical nurse specialist in the Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins and a faculty member at the Johns Hopkins School of Nursing.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: January 15, 2023

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • Thyroid Eye Disease

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 12/18/2019

    Thyroid Eye Disease (TED) is a serious, progressive autoimmune disease with a limited window for pharmacologic treatment, during the active disease. During this window, the disease may respond to pharmacologic intervention. With the potential of new infusion delivered treatment options on the horizon, it will be incumbent upon nurses and other healthcare providers to understand the disease state, as well as the treatment modalities. INS is of the belief that this need is best met and served through the development and delivery of nursing education programs.

    Commercial Support: Horizon

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    Thyroid Eye Disease (TED) is a serious, progressive autoimmune disease with a limited window for pharmacologic treatment, during the active disease. During this window, the disease may respond to pharmacologic intervention. With the potential of new infusion delivered treatment options on the horizon, it will be incumbent upon nurses and other healthcare providers to understand the disease state, as well as the treatment modalities. INS is of the belief that this need is best met and served through the development and delivery of nursing education programs.

    Learning Outcome:
    At the conclusion of this webinar, learners will have an increased understanding of thyroid eye disease and the treatment options available for patients with this condition.

    Terry J. Smith, M.D.

    Frederick G.L. Huetwell Professor Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences

    Dr. Terry J. Smith, MD, is an internationally known experimental and clinical endocrinologist. He has studied Graves’ disease, its ocular manifestations, and related autoimmune diseases for over 35 years. He and his colleagues have mapped the mechanisms involved in tissue changes occurring in thyroid-associated ophthalmopathy (TAO), a disfiguring and potentially blinding disease for which no FDA approved medications are currently available. 

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: December 18, 2022

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • Critical Geriatric Concepts for Infusion Nurses

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 11/20/2019

    As the population in the United States ages, it is becoming increasingly important that nurses in all clinical settings know how to effectively care for older adults. Research shows that lack of education on basic geriatric concepts and principles, including the changes associated with aging, can result in preventable complications and poor health outcomes for older adults. This presentation will focus on those critical geriatric concepts, as well as the resources that infusion nurses should avail themselves of, in order to practice proper care of older adults. In addition, this presentation is a call for nurses in all settings to be leaders in improving geriatric care, both where they practice and where they live. It is clear to this nursing expert that there is a critical need for nurses to be advocates for older adults and to participate in the increasing number of initiatives that seek to address the impact of aging populations on community resources.

    As the population in the United States ages, it is becoming increasingly important that nurses in all clinical settings know how to effectively care for older adults. Research shows that lack of education on basic geriatric concepts and principles, including the changes associated with aging, can result in preventable complications and poor health outcomes for older adults. This presentation will focus on those critical geriatric concepts, as well as the resources that infusion nurses should avail themselves of, in order to practice proper care of older adults. In addition, this presentation is a call for nurses in all settings to be leaders in improving geriatric care, both where they practice and where they live. It is clear to this nursing expert that there is a critical need for nurses to be advocates for older adults and to participate in the increasing number of initiatives that seek to address the impact of aging populations on community resources.

    Learning Outcomes:
    1. Identify an atypical presentation of disease in older adults.
    2. How does reduction in muscle mass and increase in fat cells impact the health of an older adult?
    3. Name one geriatric nursing resource that is recommended to be used by nurses.

    Suzanne Purvis, DNP, RN, GCNS-BC

    Clinical Nurse Specialist, Geriatrics

    Suzanne Purvis, DNP, RN, GCNS-BC, has been a geriatric clinical nurse specialist for 20 years. She obtained both her MSN and Master’s Certificate in gerontology from Georgia State University and earned her Doctor of Nursing Practice from the University of Minnesota. Her published work has focused on geriatric nursing competency development, the use of electronic health records in geriatrics, and dementia care education. She is currently a clinical nurse specialist for Beaumont Health in Royal Oak, Michigan and teaches geriatric best practice to acute care nurses. Suzanne is also on the Michigan State Dementia Coalition.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: November 20, 2022

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • The Cascading Effects of Medical Errors

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 11/02/2019

    After the session, attendees will be able to explain the strategies presented to prevent medical errors.

    Every medical error involves a patient, a family, an organization, a nurse, a physician, or other health care personnel. Some errors often have a lasting impact on the the patient?s physical and emotional health, financial well-being, or family relationships. The nurse involved may also experience signs of ?second victim syndrome.? This session will examine the cascading effects of medical error events with real-life case studies. Attendees will learn strategies to proactively prevent medical errors in their practice as well as promote patient safety.

    Learning Outcomes: After the session, attendees will be able to explain the strategies presented to prevent medical errors.

    ​Rachel Zastrow, RN, DNP, CPPS, LSSBB

    Director of Patient Safety, Central Chicago Region, Advocate Aurora Health

    Rachel Zastrow, RN, DNP, CPPS, LSSBB,  had her first foray into patient safety in 2008, when she was invited to participate in a process improvement team to eliminate CLABSI; she has been hooked ever since. She studied infection control at Loyola and achieved a doctoral in health systems administration at Rush University Chicago. She has been a director of patient safety in the Advocate Aurora Health system since 2014.

    CRNI® RUs: 2                                                                        
    This entire program has been approved for 2 CRNI® recertification units and meets the INS Meeting criteria.
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS 2019 National Academy in San Diego, CA are not eligible to receive CRNI® recertification units through this online program.

    Contact Hours: 1          
    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.                                                              
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS 2019 National Academy in San Diego, CA are not eligible to receive contact hours through this online program.


    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: November 2, 2022

    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • Peripheral Intravenous Catheters: A QI Project

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 11/02/2019

    After the session, attendees will be able to discuss the details of a quality improvement project on a bundled approach to decrease infections related to peripheral intravenous catheters.

    This session will outline a quality improvement (QI) project on a bundled approach to decrease the rate of catheter-related bloodstream infections. Session leaders will detail the rationale and procedures then conduct a discussion of project results, limitations, and recommendations for practice.

    Learning Outcomes: After the session, attendees will be able to discuss the details of a quality improvement project on a bundled approach to decrease infections related to peripheral intravenous catheters.

    ​Mary Duncan, RN, MSN, CIC

    Sr. Director Infection Prevention, UAB Health System

    Mary Duncan, RN, MSN, CIC, is a certified Infection Preventionist who has spent the last 12 years implementing best practices at her hospital to prevent infections in patients. She is currently the Senior Director of Infection Prevention at the University of Alabama-Birmingham Health System.

    CRNI® RUs: 2                                                                        
    This entire program has been approved for 2 CRNI® recertification units and meets the INS Meeting criteria.
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS 2019 National Academy in San Diego, CA are not eligible to receive CRNI® recertification units through this online program.

    Contact Hours: 1           
    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.                                                               
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS 2019 National Academy in San Diego, CA are not eligible to receive contact hours through this online program.


    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: November 2, 2022

    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • The Bloody Truth: Specimen Collection from VADs

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 11/02/2019

    After the session, attendees will be able to describe the methods and procedure for drawing blood samples from the different types of VADs.

    Vascular access devices (VADs) can be used for infusion therapy or drawing blood specimens for laboratory analysis. This session will discuss the INS Standards of Practice for drawing blood from different types of VADs, including methods and procedures. Common questions regarding drawing blood cultures, changing needleless connectors, and obtaining blood from a heparinized CVAD for coagulation tests will be addressed.

    Learning Outcomes: After the session, attendees will be able to describe the methods and procedure for drawing blood samples from the different types of VADs.

    Karen Johnson, MSN, MBA, RN, CRNI®, VA-BC

    Clinical Director of Vascular Access, TridentCare

    Karen T. Johnson, MSN, MBA, RN, CRNI®, VA-BC, is the clinical director of vascular access for TridentCare. Before working in the infusion and vascular access specialty, her professional experience was in  neonatal intensive care and adult critical care. Ms. Johnson has held leadership positions in INS chapters, worked on INS' National Council on Education for 2 terms, and was a reviewer for INS' Clinical Competency Validation Program for Infusion Therapy.

    CRNI® RUs: 2                                                                        
    This entire program has been approved for 2 CRNI® recertification units and meets the INS Meeting criteria.
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS 2019 National Academy in San Diego, CA are not eligible to receive CRNI® recertification units through this online program.

    Contact Hours: 1            
    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.                                                               
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS 2019 National Academy in San Diego, CA are not eligible to receive contact hours through this online program.


    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: November 2, 2022

    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • Reviewing Performance Across Line Types: PICCs, Midlines and SPCs

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 11/02/2019

    After the session, attendees will: ? Demonstrate how CDC?s Laboratory Confirmed Bloodstream Infection definition can be applied beyond just CLABSI surveillance ? Discuss the importance of including facility-specific device performance when making insertion decisions. ? Describe three different methods of capturing data to provide robust outcome data specific to the devices used within a facility.

    Vascular access teams use a variety of vascular access devices (VADs) and are accountable in making the best decision for each patient's needs. Understanding the current guidelines and recommendations, as well as underlying patient considerations are key elements to this analysis. Equally important, is understanding specific VAD performance within your own organization. This presentation will discuss how to develop data collection on all VADs placed with a specific focus on PICCs, midlines, and SPCs, as well as analysis of correlating CLABSI rates.

    Learning Outcomes: After the session, attendees will: 
    1. Demonstrate how CDC?s Laboratory Confirmed Bloodstream Infection definition can be applied beyond just CLABSI surveillance
    2. Discuss the importance of including facility-specific device performance when making insertion decisions
    3. Describe three different methods of capturing data to provide robust outcome data specific to the devices used within a facility


    ​Michelle DeVries, BS, MPH, CIC, VA-BC

    Senior Infection Control Officer, Methodist Hospitals

    Michelle DeVries, BS, MPH, CIC, VA-BC, has been involved in Infection Prevention for 25 years. With a background in Hospital and Molecular Epidemiology, her focus is at the intersection of vascular access, patient safety and infection prevention. Michelle serves on her local, as well as the National AVA boards and she is a former director with the Vascular Access Certification Board. Michelle is also an adjunct research fellow with AVATAR -- the Alliance for Vascular Access Teaching and Research. 

    CRNI® RUs: 2                                                                        
    This entire program has been approved for 2 CRNI® recertification units and meets the INS Meeting criteria.
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS 2019 National Academy in San Diego, CA are not eligible to receive CRNI® recertification units through this online program.

    Contact Hours: 1         
    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.                                                             
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS 2019 National Academy in San Diego, CA are not eligible to receive contact hours through this online program.


    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: November 2, 2022

    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • Virtual Conference: Advancing Oncology Practice

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 11/01/2019

    The One-Day Program provides educational offerings with a concentrated focus on current oncology-related topics. These sessions are applicable to clinicians who care for patients in a variety of care settings including, acute care, outpatient and long-term care facilities, physicians’ offices, and patients’ homes. Attendees will have the opportunity to learn from clinical experts who specialize in oncology practice. This entire program has been approved for 5 contact hours and 10 CRNI® RUs and meets the INS Meeting criteria.

    Advancing Oncology Practice

    The One-Day Program provides educational offerings with a concentrated focus on current oncology-related topics. These sessions are applicable to clinicians who care for patients in a variety of care settings including, acute care, outpatient and long-term care facilities, physicians’ offices, and patients’ homes. Attendees will have the opportunity to learn from clinical experts who specialize in oncology practice.

    Implementing and Adhering to a Chemotherapy Exposure Management Program

    9:00 - 10:00 AM PDT
    • Administration of chemotherapy expansion beyond inpatient oncology units
    • Importance of adherence to policies and procedures specific to chemotherapy exposure
    • USP General Chapter <800> standards for handling hazardous drugs in all health care settings

    Benefits and Challenges in the Use of Immunotherapies for Solid Tumors

    10:00 - 11:00 AM PDT
    • Outline cancer biomarkers
    • Comparing immunotherapy to chemotherapy as treatment for cancer
    • Recognition and management of immune-mediated side effects

    Managing Chemotherapy Extravasation Across Transitions of Care: An Oncology CNS-driven Initiative

    11:00 - 12:00 PM PDT
    • Lack of literature related to nurse management of chemotherapy extravasation beyond initial treatment
    • Significant tissue damage following extravasation
    • A formalized process for managing chemotherapy extravasations to increase patient safety and nurse satisfaction.

    Hidden in Plain Sight: Strategies for Accepting and Managing Unconscious Bias

    1:30 PM - 2:30 PM PDT
    • Unconscious biases by oncology providers may contribute to health disparities
    • Evidence-based strategies that center on understanding, assessing, and redirecting unconscious bias
    • Implicit bias can occur in health care settings through micro-aggressions and micro-invalidations.

    Genetic Testing in Cancer Patients

    2:30 PM - 3:30 PM PDT
    • Importance of genetic testing for individuals with personal or family history of susceptibility
    • Evaluation of patients for referral for genetic testing and counseling.
    • Testing results such as genetic mutations and the mechanism of carcinogenesis can aid in diagnosis and management of the disease.
    Contact Hours

    This entire program has been approved for 5 contact hours. Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: November 1, 2022

    CRNI® Recertifications Units

    This entire program has been approved for 10 CRNI® recertification units and meets the INS Meeting criteria.
    *Note: Participants who attend the live version of this program at the 2019 National Academy in San Diego, CA are not eligible to receive contact hours or CRNI® recertification units through this online program.

    Implementing and Adhering to a Chemotherapy Exposure Management Program

    Marianne Valentine, BSN, RN, CRNI®
    9:00 - 10:00 AM PDT

    Administration of chemotherapy has expanded well beyond inpatient oncology units. Chemotherapy is commonly administered in outpatient and long-term care facilities, physicians' offices, and patients' homes. Policies and procedures specific to chemotherapy exposure must be adhered to in order to limit the short-term and long-term consequences of exposure. USP General Chapter <800> provides standards for handling hazardous drugs in all health care settings to protect patients, caregivers, and health care personnel from potential exposure and harm.

    Learning Outcomes:

    After the session, attendees will: 

    1. Discuss potential toxicities of chemotherapy drugs.  
    2. List common sites where chemotherapy is administered.  
    3. Discuss USP <800> standards for hazardous drugs.  
    4. Discuss PPE, safe handling and waste disposal of chemotherapy drugs.  
    5. Discuss implications for alternate sites including and caregivers.

    Benefits and Challenges in the Use of Immunotherapies for Solid Tumors

    Glenda L Kaminski, PhD, MS, APRN, AOCN, CRNI®
    10:00 - 11:00 AM PDT

    This presentation will outline cancer biomarkers and compare immunotherapy to chemotherapy as treatment for cancer. Information about recognition and management of immune-mediated side effects related to immunotherapy, such as cutaneous, gastrointestinal, renal, respiratory, endocrine, and neurological effects will also be discussed.

    Learning Outcomes:

    After the session, attendees will:

    1. Recognize the differences in mechanism of action between checkpoint inhibitors and chemotherapy  
    2. Identify the most common adverse events for checkpoint inhibition in solid tumors and review the recommended management strategies  
    3. Outline the signs and symptoms that nurses need to be aware of to facilitate prompt identification and treatment of immune-related adverse events.

    Managing Chemotherapy Extravasation Across Transitions of Care: An Oncology CNS-driven Initiative

    Christina Colvin, MSN, APRN, AOCNS, CRNI®
    Diana Karius, MS, APRN, CNS, AOCN
    11:00 AM - 12:00 PM PDT

    Literature related to nurse management of chemotherapy extravasation beyond initial treatment is lacking. Following extravasation, tissue damage can be significant when patients return for their regular appointment. Two oncology clinical nurse specialists designed a formal consult process to observe, manage, and make recommendations for follow-up. Since implementation of the process, multiple requests for consultations have been received. A formalized process for managing chemotherapy extravasations increases patient safety and nurse satisfaction.

    Learning Outcomes:

    After the session, attendees will be able to describe the necessity of a formalized process for the management of chemotherapy extravasations.


    Hidden in Plain Sight: Strategies for Accepting and Managing Unconscious Bias

    Paula Schultz MSN-ED, RN, CRNI®
    1:30 - 2:30 PM PDT

    Unconscious biases held by oncology providers may contribute to health disparities. This interactive presentation provides evidence-based strategies that center on understanding, assessing, and redirecting unconscious bias through focused debriefing, categorized management strategies, and perspective taking. Participants will learn how implicit bias can occur in health care settings through micro-aggressions and micro-invalidations.

    Learning Outcomes:

    After the session, attendees will: 

    1. Identify their personal level of unconscious bias awareness, its potential effect upon patient communication, and strategies for managing their perspective  
    2. Analyze effects of unconscious bias on cancer care disparities and subtle ways bias manifests in the patient/provider relationship  
    3. Compare and contrast stages of unconscious bias awareness and associated management strategies  
    4. Apply creative expression to gain insight, empathy, and relational awareness of patient situations.

    Genetic Testing in Cancer Patients

    Jane Lacovara, MSN, CNS-BC, CMSRN
    2:30 - 3:30 PM PDT

    Indications for genetic testing include individuals who have a personal or family history of genetic susceptibility. This session will discuss the importance of genetic testing in cancer treatment protocols as well as evaluate the need for referring patients for genetic testing and counseling. Attendees will also learn how the results of the testing, such as genetic mutations and the mechanism of carcinogenesis will aid in diagnosis or influence the medical or surgical management of the disease.

    Learning Outcomes:

    After the session, attendees will:

    1. Evaluate the need for patient referral for genetic testing and counseling 
    2. Define penetrance as it relates to genetic mutations 
    3. State the importance of genetic testing in cancer treatment protocols

    Marianne Valentine, BSN, RN, CRNI®

    Nurse Manager, PharmaCare Infusion Services

    Marianne Valentine, BSN, RN, CRNI®, is a Nurse Manager with PharmaCare Infusion Services. She has more than 33 years experience in infusion nursing, with 25 years in home infusion.  She is a part-time instructor at Allegany College of Maryland, teaching infusion therapy to nursing students. Marianne has been a member of  INS since 1990, and a speaker at the INS annual meeting in 2000. She was a contributing editor for Plummer’s Principles & Practice of Intravenous Therapy, 8th edition.

    Glenda L Kaminski, PhD, MS, APRN, AOCN, CRNI®

    Clinical Nurse Specialist, Oncology, Lakeland Regional Health

    Glenda L Kaminski, PhD, MS, APRN, AOCN, CRNI®, has been a medical oncology nurse for 35 years, 25 of which were spent as a Clinical Nurse Specialist. Dr. Kaminski teaches nurses that are new to oncology about the cancer journey and how to support and educate their patients and those patients' families.

    Christina Colvin, MSN, APRN, AOCNS, CRNI®

    Clinical Nurse Specialist, Cleveland Clinic

    Christina Colvin, MSN, APRN, AOCNS, CRNI®, began her nursing career as a clinical nurse on the adult in-patient hematology/oncology unit, expanding to include ambulatory chemotherapy infusion and hematopoietic stem cell transplant after obtaining her AOCNS in 2008.
    Professional contributions include developing education, safety and support initiatives for patients and expert consultation on complex vascular access topics, including assessing extravasations, product evaluation and best practices related to general care of patients with vascular access devices.

    Diana Karius, MS, APRN, CNS, AOCN

    Clinical Nurse Specialist, Hematology/Oncology, Cleveland Clinic

    Diana Karius, MS, APRN, CNS, AOCN is a CNS at the Cleveland Clinic  in hematology/oncology.  She has 40 years of nursing experience, with 26 of those years in Oncology. She has developed curriculum for orientation and coordinates courses in chemotherapy and End of life. Diana is a published author, and in 2011 she received the Mary Nowotny Excellence in Cancer Nursing Education award from the Oncology Nursing Society.

    Paula Schultz MSN-ED, RN, CRNI®

    Clinical Educator - Infusion, University Hospitals Home Care Services

    Paula Schultz MSN-ED, RN, CRNI®, is Infusion Clinical Educator at University Hospitals Home Care Services, Cleveland, Ohio. With background in oncology patient and public education, Paula has presented health literacy/cultural competence training in numerous settings including the 2017 International Cancer Education Conference. She is author of Teaching Strategies to Increase Nursing Student Acceptance and Management of Unconscious Bias, and a recipient of the 2016 Jarvis Joiner Award for Clinical Excellence in Culturally Competent and Sensitive Care.

    Jane Lacovara, MSN, CNS-BC, CMSRN

    Clinical Nurse Specialist, University of Arizona Medical Center

    Jane Lacovara is an advanced practice registered nurse and is board certified as a clinical nurse specialist and expert in oncology at the University of Arizona Medical Center in Tucson, Arizona where she provides consulting services to the high-risk cancer patients in an acute care urban hospital. In her role at the hospital, she focuses on preventing complications in solid-tumor patients for both the oncology and surgery oncology patient populations.

  • Smart Infusion Pumps: Using Data and Evidence to Improve Patient Safety

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 10/23/2019

    This presentation will provide the audience with a history of the use of the Smart Infusion Pump in the US. The presenter will also define and explain terms often associated with Smart Pumps, such as Dose Error-Reduction System (DERS), Pump Interoperability and Drug Library. Participants will engage in an overview of the 2019 draft guidelines for Optimizing Safe Implementation and Use of Smart Infusion Pumps from the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP). The presenter will attempt to provide supporting evidence and user-based pump data to support various aspects of the guidelines. Finally, based on the ISMP guidelines and the evidence presented, participants will receive some specific actions to take, regarding patient safety, when using Smart Infusion Pumps.

    This presentation will provide the audience with a history of the use of the Smart Infusion Pump in the US. The presenter will also define and explain terms often associated with Smart Pumps, such as Dose Error-Reduction System (DERS), Pump Interoperability and Drug Library. Participants will engage in an overview of the 2019 draft guidelines for Optimizing Safe Implementation and Use of Smart Infusion Pumps from the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP). The presenter will attempt to provide supporting evidence and user-based pump data to support various aspects of the guidelines. Finally, based on the ISMP guidelines and the evidence presented, participants will receive some specific actions to take, regarding patient safety, when using Smart Infusion Pumps.

    Learning Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, the participant should be able to:
    1) Describe the general function of Smart Infusion Pumps and the terminology associated with their use
    2) Identify the types of data available from Smart Infusion Pumps
    3) Describe various aspects of guidelines, best practice documents, supporting data and evidence from the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP).
    4) Outline actions that an infusion nurse can take to promote safe therapy using a Smart Infusion Pump

    ​Dan Degnan, PharmD, MS, CPPS, FASHP

    Associate Director of the Professional Program Lab, Purdue University College of Pharmacy

    Dan Degnan, PharmD, MS, CPPS, FASHP, is currently the Associate Director of the Professional Program Lab at the Purdue University College of Pharmacy, as well as a Clinical Assistant Professor of Pharmacy Practice.  Dan also works with the Regenstrief Center for Healthcare Engineering (RCHE), at Purdue, as a Clinical Research Associate with expertise and research interests in the area of medication safety technology, safety culture, pharmacy operations and high reliability. 

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: October 23, 2022

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.