Learning Catalog Advanced Search

Search by Categories
Search in Packages
Search by Format
Search by Date Range
Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
Start
End
Search by Keyword
Sort By
  • Unleashing the Immune System: Treatment and Adverse Event Management for the Immuno-Oncology Patient

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Includes a Live Event on 08/22/2018 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    This presentation will discuss the clinical indications, administration, and adverse-event implications of novel immuno-oncology agents. As these therapies have emerged, it is evident that the side-effect profile and management of these agents are vastly different from traditional chemotherapy. Immuno-oncology-specific education for health care workers and patients is critical to the safe delivery and implementation of high-quality care. Throughout this presentation, the background of employing the immune system to fight cancer, and using real-patient scenarios to demonstrate best practices for infusion clinicians in the care, quality, and education of the immuno-oncology patient will be explored.

    This presentation will discuss the clinical indications, administration, and adverse-event implications of novel immuno-oncology agents. As these therapies have emerged, it is evident that the side-effect profile and management of these agents are vastly different from traditional chemotherapy. Immuno-oncology-specific education for health care workers and patients is critical to the safe delivery and implementation of high-quality care. Throughout this presentation, the background of employing the immune system to fight cancer, and using real-patient scenarios to demonstrate best practices for infusion clinicians in the care, quality, and education of the immuno-oncology patient will be explored.

    Learning Outcomes: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Identify 3 signs and symptoms of an immune-mediated adverse event.
    • Discuss the importance of early identification and treatment of adverse events.
    • Verbalize 3 different methods of education for immuno-oncology patients.

    ​Megan Derr, MSN, RN, CMSRN, AONCS®

    Megan Derr, MSN, RN, CMSRN, AONCS®, is an oncology quality and evidence-based practice specialist at the Lehigh Valley Cancer Institute in Allentown, Pennsylvania. She is certified by the Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation as an advanced oncology clinical nurse specialist. A highlight in her current role has been educating the cancer institute about immuno-oncology agents, their side effects, and adverse event management. 

    CRNI® Recerts: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit

    Contact Hours/CE Credits: This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours

  • Hazardous Infusion Drug Administration in the Home Setting

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Recorded On: 07/25/2018

    Hazardous drug (HD) agents traditionally have been administered in controlled, health care settings. However, the introduction of intravenous (IV) HDs for home administration has become an area of growing concern for home care agencies and home infusion nurses. The United States Pharmacopeia (USP) has regulated the admixture and handling of HDs for controlled settings, and its role is now expanding to include all areas in the trajectory of care. Home infusion is one aspect of care that will require nursing education, policies and procedures, and appropriate personal protective equipment. Successful implementation of USP regulations will require home health infusion teams to develop a hazardous drug administration and exposure management plan to protect infusion nurses, patients and families, and the environment from toxic residue exposure.

    Hazardous drug (HD) agents traditionally have been administered in controlled, health care settings. However, the introduction of intravenous (IV) HDs for home administration has become an area of growing concern for home care agencies and home infusion nurses. The United States Pharmacopeia (USP) has regulated the admixture and handling of HDs for controlled settings, and its role is now expanding to include all areas in the trajectory of care. Home infusion is one aspect of care that will require nursing education, policies and procedures, and appropriate personal protective equipment. Successful implementation of USP <800> regulations will require home health infusion teams to develop a hazardous drug administration and exposure management plan to protect infusion nurses, patients and families, and the environment from toxic residue exposure. 

    Learning Outcomes: At the conclusion of this session, learners will be able to: 
    • Discuss the impact USP <800> will have on home infusion nurses.
    • Recognize the risks to nurses, patients and families, and the environment associated with intravenous (IV) drug residue exposure.
    • Identify necessary safety precautions when administering IV chemotherapy and other HDs in the home.
    • Review specific patient and family education that may prevent and/or reduce the risk of HD exposure in the home.

    Cynthia Huff, MSN, RN, CRNI®, OCN®, CNL

    Home Infusion Coordinator

    Cynthia Huff, MSN, RN, CRNI®, OCN®, CNL, is a home infusion coordinator at Sutter Infusion & Pharmacy Services in Sacramento, California. Her experience as an infusion and oncology nurse spans more than 20 years. Ms. Huff’s current nursing focus is to protect health care workers, patients and families, and the environment from exposure to hazardous drug residue as the administration of oral and intravenous chemotherapy increasingly takes place in patients’ homes. Ms. Huff earned a master’s degree in nursing from the University of San Francisco (USF) and recently obtained certification as a clinical nurse leader (CNL). She is currently enrolled in USF’s doctor of nursing practice degree program, with a focus on population health leadership. Her goal is to teach nursing practice.  

    Rosangel Klein, MS, RN, CNS, OCN®

    Oncology Clinical Nurse Specialist

    Rosangel Klein, MS, RN, CNS, OCN®, is the oncology clinical nurse specialist at Sutter Roseville Medical Center. She has held a number of leadership positions at Sutter Health. Most recently, she was Sutter Health Valley Area’s interim oncology service line executive and oncology service line clinical director. As service line clinical director, she was responsible for clinical integration across the continuum of care. Before this role, she served as the regional infusion center manager for Sutter Roseville Medical Center, where she worked for 4 years and was instrumental in the growth of the infusion center. She assisted in opening a new comprehensive cancer center in 2016. Ms. Klein earned a bachelor’s degree in nursing from the University of San Francisco and completed a master’s degree in oncology nursing at the University of California San Francisco.   

    Surani Kwan, MBA, MSN, NP-BC, FACHE, FAAN

    Director for Professional Practice and Nursing Excellence

    Surani Kwan, MBA, MSN, NP-BC, FACHE, FAAN, is director for professional practice and nursing excellence for Sutter Health, where she is responsible for advancing professional practice throughout system affiliates, and providing leadership in professional development, clinical education, and training for nursing and advanced practice clinicians. She was previously the executive director of operations for the Sutter Pacific Medical Foundation. Kwan has been a member of the California Association for Nurse Practitioners for nearly 20 years and served as the association’s president for 2 terms. Currently pursuing a doctorate in nursing practice at Samuel Merritt University in Oakland, California, Kwan holds a master’s of science degree in nursing and a master’s degree in business administration. She is also a certified family nurse practitioner and a Fellow of the American Association for Nurse Practitioners and the American College of Healthcare Executives.

    CRNI® Recerts: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit

    Contact Hours/CE Credits: This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours

  • Intravenous Immunoglobulin Therapy: Treatment Approaches, Product Selection, and Administration Considerations

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Recorded On: 06/13/2018

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy is a life-saving treatment for patients with primary immune deficiency diseases. More than 75% of IVIg therapy administered in the United States is for patients with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. However, indications for use continue to increase. In this session, we will discuss the mechanism of action of immunoglobulins, the use of IVIg therapy in certain disease states, and dosing strategies. Current standardization of product selection, approaches to dosing, and administration, which have had a positive impact on patient safety, will also be considered.

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy is a life-saving treatment for patients with primary immune deficiency diseases. More than 75% of IVIg therapy administered in the United States is for patients with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. However, indications for use continue to increase.  In this session, we will discuss the mechanism of action of immunoglobulins, the use of IVIg therapy in certain disease states, and dosing strategies. Current standardization of product selection, approaches to dosing, and administration, which have had a positive impact on patient safety, will also be considered.  

    Learning Outcomes:  At the conclusion of this presentation, learners will be able to:

    • Verbalize 3 diagnoses for which intravenous immunoglobulin therapy is used.
    • Discuss the mechanism of action of immunoglobulins.
    • Describe approaches to dosing and administration.


    Amy Clarke, RN, IgCN

    Director of Nursing Clinical Program Services

    Amy Clarke, RN, IgCN, is the director of nursing clinical program services for Diplomat Specialty Infusion Group. Involved in specialty and home infusion services since 1994, she has performed more than 2,000 intravenous and subcutaneous infusions. Ms. Clarke has delivered numerous presentations on immunoglobulin administration, including continuing education sessions for the National Home Infusion Association and the Immunoglobulin Nursing Society (IgNS). She is the immediate past president of IgNS. 

    CRNI® Recerts: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit

    Contact Hours/CE Credits: This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours

  • Virtual Conference: Infusion Nursing: Why We Do What We Do

    Contains 3 Component(s), 4.00 credits offered Recorded On: 05/22/2018

    More than 90% of all hospitalized patients require some form of infusion therapy, and a growing number of patients are receiving infusion therapy outside an acute care setting. Today’s track will feature expert infusion nurses who will answer common practice questions, as well as provide foundational information about fluids and electrolytes and pain management strategies.

    Infusion Nursing: Why We Do What We Do

    More than 90% of all hospitalized patients require some form of infusion therapy, and a growing number of patients are receiving infusion therapy outside an acute care setting. Today’s track will feature expert infusion nurses who will answer common practice questions, as well as provide foundational information about fluids and electrolytes and pain management strategies. 

    LIVE with Infusion Nurse Experts!

    8:00 - 9:00 AM EDT
    • Description of how “Ask INS” online portal works
    • Review of top 10 most frequently asked questions
    • Participant submission of questions included

    Pain Management: The Role of Infusion Nurses in Inpatient and Ambulatory Settings

    9:00 - 10:00 AM EDT
    • Importance of pain control for patients
    • World Health Organization acknowledgement of pain relief as basic human right
    • Presentation of evidence-based solutions for pain management 

    Principles of Infusion Therapy: Fluids

    10:30 - 11:30 AM EDT
    • Understanding fluid and electrolyte balance
    • Review of basics
    • Assessment of fluid and measurement of electrolyte needs

    Electrolytes: Opposites Attract

    11:30 AM - 12:30 PM EDT
    • Application of fluid and electrolyte administration
    • Medications that disrupt balance
    • Effective delivery of intravenous medication

    Infusion Therapy from Hospital to Home - Bridging the Gap

    1:00 - 2:00 PM EDT
    • Home infusion therapy continues to grow and expand in scope
    • The process of transitioning the patient requiring home infusion therapy was mapped                   
    • The work of AAMI focusing on the hospital to home transition is described
    Contact Hours

    This entire program has been approved for 4 contact hours. Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: May 22, 2021

    CRNI® Recertifications Units

    This entire program has been approved for 10 CRNI® recertification units.
    *Note: Participants who attend the live version of this program at INS 2018 in Cleveland, OH are not eligible to receive contact hours or CRNI® recertification units through this online program.

    LIVE with Infusion Nurse Experts!

    Britt Meyer, PhD, RN, CRNI®, VA-BC, NE-BC
    Denise Harper, MSN, RN, CRNI®, ACNS-BC
    Karen Johnson, MSN, MBA, RN, CRNI®, CPUI, VA-BC

    8:00 – 9:00 AM EDT

    "Ask INS" on the INS website, ins1.org, is where visitors can submit infusion-related questions or browse the answers to queries submitted by other infusion nurses. During this session, attendees will have an opportunity to learn how "Ask INS" works, review the current Top 10 most frequently asked questions and their answers, and have their own questions answered. Use the live chat function on the side of your screen to submit a question to be addressed during this session.

    Learning Outcomes: After the session, attendees will be able to discuss the answers to frequently asked questions of infusion nurses based on the Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice (2016) and current clinical practice.


    Pain Management: The Role of Infusion Nurses in Inpatient and Ambulatory Settings

    Carolyn Ruffing, MS, BSN, RN, OCN®
    9:00 - 10:00 AM EDT

    Much has been written in the past two decades about the importance of pain control for all patients. The World Health Organization has even acknowledged pain relief as a basic human right. Unfortunately, pain continues to be a complex and unresolved barrier to achieving desired outcomes in the U.S. health care system. This presentation will provide infusion nurses with evidence-based information to improve patient outcomes and for effective pain management and assessment.

    Learning Outcomes: After the session, attendees will be able to describe correctly the pathophysiology of pain and its impact on patients. They also will be able to cite the use of evidence-based practice in pain management.


    Principles of Infusion Therapy: Fluids

    Christie Heinzman, MSN, RN, PNP-AC
    10:30 AM - 11:30 PM EDT

    Understanding fluid and electrolyte balance is an essential, fundamental stepping stone in the care of patients receiving intravenous therapies. However, it is often overlooked or forgotten in our high-technological functions. This session will review the basics to strengthen attendees' knowledge of the assessment of fluid and the measurement of electrolyte needs and changes. 

    Learning Outcomes: After the session, attendees will be able to name three techniques to assess fluid needs and two electrolytes, and how to assess for their deprivation.


    Electrolytes: Opposites Attract

    Brian W Dubiel, RD, LD, CNSC
    11:30 AM - 12:30 PM EDT

    The values are understood and the problem has been assessed. Now what? This session will focus on the application of fluid and electrolyte administration, and medications that may disrupt this delicate balance. It also will enhance attendees' knowledge of how to deliver intravenous medication effectively and efficiently, while establishing and maintaining this critical physiologic balance.

    Learning Outcomes: After the session, attendees will be able to describe the scope of practice and 4 components of a model for safe home infusion therapy. They will also be able to discuss critical issues to address during the transition from acute to home care.


    Infusion Therapy from Hospital to Home - Bridging the Gap

    Lisa Gorski, MS, RN, HHCNS-BC, CRNI®, FAAN
    1:00 - 2:00 PM EDT

    The practice of home infusion therapy continues to grow and expand in scope. Based upon work done with the AAMI Foundation, the process of transitioning the patient requiring home infusion therapy was mapped from the hospital to the time of discharge from home care. Gaps and opportunities for process improvement were then identified. During this presentation, an overview of selected home infusion therapy issues are highlighted, a model for safe home infusion therapy is presented, and the work of AAMI focusing on the hospital to home transition is described.

    Learning Outcomes: After the session, attendees will be able to describe the scope of practice and 4 components of a model for safe home infusion therapy. They will also be able to discuss critical issues to address during the transition from acute to home care.


    Contact Hours

    This entire program has been approved for 4 contact hours. Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: May 22, 2021

    CRNI® Recertification Units

    This entire program has been approved for 10 CRNI® recertification units.

    *Note: Participants who attend the live version of this program at INS 2018 in Cleveland, OH are not eligible to receive contact hours or CRNI® recertification units through this online program.

    Britt Meyer, PhD, RN, CRNI®, VA-BC, NE-BC

    Duke University Hospital

    Britt Meyer, PhD, RN, CRNI®, VABC, NEBC, a past president of INS, is nurse manager operations of the Duke University Hospital vascular access team. She teaches and speaks nationally and internationally on infusion-related topics, and recently completed a research study examining the patient experience related to peripherally inserted central catheter deep vein thrombosis.

    Denise Harper, MSN, RN, CRNI®, ACNS-BC

    Vidant Medical Center

    Denise Harper, MSN, RN, CRNI®, ACNS-BC, is a clinical nurse specialist, infusion and adult medicine, at Vidant Medical Center. She has been a nurse for more than 30 years, many of those years working in the field of home infusion. A CRNI® for more than 20 years, she spent 4 years on INS' National Council on Education. She serves as Vidant Medical Center's infusion content expert and uses INS' Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice to keep policies up-to-date.

    Karen Johnson, MSN, MBA, RN, CRNI®, CPUI, VA-BC

    MobilexUSA

    Karen T. Johnson, MSN, MBA, RN, CRNI®, CPUI, VA-BC, is clinical director of vascular access for MobilexUSA. She has worked in infusion nursing for the past 15 years, and has experience as a neonatal and adult intensive care nurse. Active in the Infusion Nurses Society and the Association for Vascular Access, she has served both at the local and national levels. Ms. Johnson has been the recipient of the South Carolina Nurses Foundation's Palmetto Gold award, which is presented to nurses who exemplify excellence in nursing practice and commitment to the nursing profession.

    Carolyn Ruffing, MS, BSN, RN, OCN®

    University of Rochester Medical Center's Wilmot Cancer Institute

    Carolyn Ruffing, MS, BSN, RN, OCN®, is an oncology nurse with the University of Rochester Medical Center's Wilmot Cancer Institute (WCI). Experienced in inpatient oncology, palliative and hospice care, infusion therapy, and outpatient clinics, she currently is  developing a Nurse Navigator program for WCI. Her specialty is pain and symptom management. Cochair of the WCI pain committee, she also lectures on pain, with a focus on the oncology environment.

    Christie Heinzman, RN, MSN, PNP-AC

    Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

    Christie Heinzman, MSN, RN, PNP-AC, is a pediatric nurse practitioner in the division of gastroenterology, hepatology, and nutrition at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. She has 5 years of experience as a nurse practitioner and more than 12 years of experience in gastrointestinal nursing. She expects to complete a doctor of nursing practice degree in 2018.

    Brian William Dubiel, RD, LD, CNSC

    Cleveland Clinic

    Brian W Dubiel, RD, LD, CNSC, is an advanced practice clinical dietitian at the Cleveland Clinic, where he has practiced for 10 years. A member of the Cleveland Clinic’s nutrition support team, he leads daily physician bedside rounds for patients receiving total parenteral nutrition. He also provides nutrition therapy to patients in the intensive care setting. He is currently an investigator in two research studies.

    Lisa Gorski, MS, RN, HHCNS-BC, CRNI®, FAAN

    Wheaton Franciscan Home Health & Hospice

    Lisa works as a clinical nurse specialist at Wheaton Franciscan Home Health & Hospice in Milwaukee and has over 30 years of experience in infusion nursing. She received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee College of Nursing. She is the author of over 40 journal articles and has authored three books on the topic of home infusion therapy. She is the coauthor of the 2014 Manual of IV Therapeutics: An Evidence-Based Practice for Infusion Therapy. She was an editor for the Infusion Nurses Society’s 2010 textbook Infusion Nursing in Clinical Practice: An Evidence-Based Approach and the Core Curriculum for Infusion Nursing, 4th edition. She served as INS president from 2007 to 2008 and chaired the 2011 and 2016 INS Standards of Practice committees. In 2006, she was inducted as a Fellow into the American Academy of Nursing. Lisa was honored as the INCC CRNI® of the Year in 2003 and as the 2011 CNS of the Year by the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists.

  • Aseptic Non-Touch Technique (ANTT®): Reducing Health Care-Acquired Infections through Standardization

    Contains 2 Component(s), 1.60 credits offered Recorded On: 05/21/2018

    Health care workers are the primary vectors of infection during invasive clinical procedures and maintenance of invasive medical systems. Health care organizations can reduce this clinical risk and subsequent infection rates significantly by implementing aseptic nontouch technique, a standard approach to aseptic technique.

    Health care workers are the primary vectors of infection during invasive clinical procedures and maintenance of invasive medical systems. Health care organizations can reduce this clinical risk and subsequent infection rates significantly by implementing aseptic nontouch technique, a standard approach to aseptic technique.

    Learning Outcomes

    After the session, attendees will be able to describe aseptic nontouch technique (ANTT), understand the historical alternative of "aseptic technique," and identify the implications of ANTT for patient safety.

    Contact Hours: 1.6                                                               
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS 2018 in Cleveland, OH are not eligible to receive contact hours through this online program.

    CRNI Recert Units: 4                                                                     
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS 2018 in Cleveland, OH are not eligible to receive CRNI® recertification units through this online program.

    Stephen Rowley, MSc, BSc (Hons), RN, RSCN

    Association for Aseptic Technique (ANTT)

    Simon Clare, MRes, BA, RN

    The Association for Safe Aseptic Practice (ASAP)

  • The Trifecta of Collaboration: Skin Integrity, Infection Prevention, and Vascular Access

    Contains 2 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Recorded On: 05/21/2018

    After the session, attendees will be able to name two techniques that enhance the care of central vascular access devices and compare and contrast three professional viewpoints on catheter care.

    This session will illustrate the importance of collaboration between three professions with different ideologies and a passion for patient care. A vascular access specialist, an infection preventionist, and a skin integrity nurse practitioner identified a need and collaborated to prevent central line-associated blood stream infections (CLABSIs), medical adhesive-related skin injuries (MARSIs), and moisture-associated skin damage (MASD). Each served as the content expert (CE) for their specialty, while considering the needs and guidelines of the other specialties. The vascular access specialist provided guidance for care of central catheters based on the Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice published by INS. The infection preventionist provided guidance based on CLABSI prevention guidelines published by the Association of Professionals in Infection Prevention and Epidemiology and the Society for Healthcare Epidemiology. The skin integrity nurse practitioner provided diagnosis, treatment, and guidance related to the prevention of MARSI and MASD according to the standards of the Wound, Ostomy and Continence Nurses Society and guidelines published by the National Pressure Ulcer Advisory Panel. The collaborative efforts of the three professionals proved beneficial for patients and educational for each CE.

    Learning Outcomes

    After the session, attendees will be able to name two techniques that enhance the care of central vascular access devices and compare and contrast three professional viewpoints on catheter care.

    Contact Hours: 0.8                                                               
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS 2018 in Cleveland, OH are not eligible to receive contact hours through this online program.

    CRNI Recert Units: 2                                                                     
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS 2018 in Cleveland, OH are not eligible to receive CRNI® recertification units through this online program.


    Robin Huneke Rosenberg, MA, RN-BC, CRNI®, VA-BC

    3M

    Adriene Thornton, MA, BSN, RN, CIC®

    Children's Minnesota

  • Creative Strategies to Competency

    Contains 2 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Recorded On: 05/21/2018

    How do you evaluate clinical competency? Annual competency evaluation methods for nurses and leveraging technology to ensure competency will be explored.

    How do you evaluate clinical competency? Annual competency evaluation methods for nurses and leveraging technology to ensure competency will be explored.

    Learning Outcomes

    After the session, attendees will have learned fun and creative ways to ensure staff competency.

    Contact Hours: 0.8                                                               
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS 2018 in Cleveland, OH are not eligible to receive contact hours through this online program.

    CRNI Recert Units: 2                                                                     
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS 2018 in Cleveland, OH are not eligible to receive CRNI® recertification units through this online program.

    Gwen Sherwood, PhD, RN, FAAN, ANEF

    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

  • Evidence-based Central Vascular Access Management: A Call to Action!

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 05/21/2018

    Central vascular access devices (CVADs) can be in place from hours to weeks and even long after. This session will discuss the requirement for evidence-based, postinsertion vascular access management to reduce clinical and economic risks from hospital to home.

    image

    Central vascular access devices (CVADs) can be in place from hours to weeks and even long after. This session will discuss the requirement for evidence-based, postinsertion vascular access management to reduce clinical and economic risks from hospital to home.

    Learning Outcomes

    After the session, attendees will be able to consider the foundational elements for evidence-based, care and maintenance bundles (CMBs) for CVADs, discuss the implementation of an evidence-based CMB for 1 group of home infusion patients, and acknowledge the need for standardized use of evidence-based practice and products used in CMBs from hospital to home care.

    CRNI Recert Units: 2                                                                     
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS 2018 in Cleveland, OH are not eligible to receive CRNI® recertification units through this online program.


    Ann Williams, RN, CRNI®

    Deaconess Home Medical Equipment and Infusion

  • Central Vascular Access Devices: Case Studies of Complications

    Contains 2 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Recorded On: 05/21/2018

    Complications related to central vascular access devices (CVADs) during insertion, management, and removal may result in increased patient morbidity and/or mortality, as well as higher health care costs. This session will discuss CVAD-associated bloodstream and local infections, dislodgment, occlusion, thrombosis, breakage, and migration.

    Complications related to central vascular access devices (CVADs) during insertion, management, and removal may result in increased patient morbidity and/or mortality, as well as higher health care costs. This session will discuss CVAD-associated bloodstream and local infections, dislodgment, occlusion, thrombosis, breakage, and migration.

    Learning Outcomes

    After the session, attendees will be able to list potential CVAD-related complications and discuss appropriate interventions for troubleshooting and resolution.

    Contact Hours: 0.8                                                               
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS 2018 in Cleveland, OH are not eligible to receive contact hours through this online program.

    CRNI Recert Units: 2                                                                     
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS 2018 in Cleveland, OH are not eligible to receive CRNI® recertification units through this online program.

    Connie Girgenti, BSN, RN, VA-BC

    PSJMC/Vygon

    Sheri Pieroni, BSN, RN, VA-BC

    Presence Health

  • The Patient Experience: An Essential Component in Improving Health Outcomes in Home Infusion

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Recorded On: 05/15/2018

    Patients have been receiving infusion therapy in their homes since the 1980s. However, the demand and volume of therapies that can be infused in the home continues to rise. Many of these infusions can be administered by the patient. This webinar will explore the importance of the patient experience in improving overall health outcomes in patients who receive home infusion by examining case studies and observations from the field. The first-ever Certified Patient Experience Professional in the pharmacy field, Amanda Walker, BSN, RN, CPXP, will share what she has learned about how to improve outcomes in home infusion by creating a practice focused on the patient experience.

    Patients have been receiving infusion therapy in their homes since the 1980s. However, the demand and volume of therapies that can be infused in the home continues to rise. Many of these infusions can be administered by the patient. This webinar will explore the importance of the patient experience in improving overall health outcomes in patients who receive home infusion by examining case studies and observations from the field. The first-ever Certified Patient Experience Professional in the pharmacy field, Amanda Walker, BSN, RN, CPXP, will share what she has learned about how to improve outcomes in home infusion by creating a practice focused on the patient experience. 

    LEARNING OUTCOMES
    At the end of this presentation, learners will be able to: 
    • Identify the role of home infusion nurses in infusion therapy education, administration, and management. 
    • Explain verbally how they will use the tools discussed to evaluate their patients’ ability to infuse themselves safely or if a caregiver needs to be involved.
    • Define patient experience (PX) and describe how they will incorporate the fundamentals of PX into their nursing practice, regardless of the care setting.  

    Amanda Walker, BSN, RN, CPXP

    Senior Vice President, Patient Experience

    Amanda Walker, BSN, RN, CPXP, is the senior vice president, patient experience at Heritage Biologics, a home infusion and specialty pharmacy located just outside of Kansas City. An industry leader in patient experience, Amanda became the first Certified Patient Experience Professional (CPXP) in the pharmacy sphere and created the first patient-experience program in a pharmacy. As a member of the executive leadership team at Heritage Biologics, Amanda has woven patient experience into every element of the pharmacy’s program, unifying quality, safety, and experience strategies to improve overall patient outcomes. Before joining Heritage Biologics, she worked at the University of Kansas Hospital, serving the hematology/oncology, blood and marrow transplant inpatient population as a nurse, and later, as a clinical nurse educator, overseeing the education of more than 150 nurses and staff. Amanda’s passion for treating the whole patient has led her to become involved as a board member with the Kansas City chapter of HopeKids, a nonprofit organization which focuses on providing activities and support to children with life-threatening medical conditions and their families. 

    CRNI® Recerts: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit

    Contact Hours/CE Credits: This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours