Learning Catalog Advanced Search

Search by Categories
Search in Packages
Search by Format
Search by Date Range
Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
Start
End
Search by Keyword
Sort By
  • Intravenous Immunoglobulin Therapy: Treatment Approaches, Product Selection, and Administration Considerations

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Includes a Live Event on 06/13/2018 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy is a life-saving treatment for patients with primary immune deficiency diseases. More than 75% of IVIg therapy administered in the United States is for patients with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. However, indications for use continue to increase. In this session, we will discuss the mechanism of action of immunoglobulins, the use of IVIg therapy in certain disease states, and dosing strategies. Current standardization of product selection, approaches to dosing, and administration, which have had a positive impact on patient safety, will also be considered.

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy is a life-saving treatment for patients with primary immune deficiency diseases. More than 75% of IVIg therapy administered in the United States is for patients with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. However, indications for use continue to increase.  In this session, we will discuss the mechanism of action of immunoglobulins, the use of IVIg therapy in certain disease states, and dosing strategies. Current standardization of product selection, approaches to dosing, and administration, which have had a positive impact on patient safety, will also be considered.  

    Learning Outcomes:  At the conclusion of this presentation, learners will be able to:

    • Verbalize 3 diagnoses for which intravenous immunoglobulin therapy is used.
    • Discuss the mechanism of action of immunoglobulins.
    • Describe approaches to dosing and administration.


    Amy Clarke, RN, IgCN

    Director of Nursing Clinical Program Services

    Amy Clarke, RN, IgCN, is the director of nursing clinical program services for Diplomat Specialty Infusion Group. Involved in specialty and home infusion services since 1994, she has performed more than 2,000 intravenous and subcutaneous infusions. Ms. Clarke has delivered numerous presentations on immunoglobulin administration, including continuing education sessions for the National Home Infusion Association and the Immunoglobulin Nursing Society (IgNS). She is the immediate past president of IgNS. 

    CRNI® Recerts: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit

    Contact Hours/CE Credits: This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours

  • The Patient Experience: An Essential Component in Improving Health Outcomes in Home Infusion

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Recorded On: 05/15/2018

    Patients have been receiving infusion therapy in their homes since the 1980s. However, the demand and volume of therapies that can be infused in the home continues to rise. Many of these infusions can be administered by the patient. This webinar will explore the importance of the patient experience in improving overall health outcomes in patients who receive home infusion by examining case studies and observations from the field. The first-ever Certified Patient Experience Professional in the pharmacy field, Amanda Walker, BSN, RN, CPXP, will share what she has learned about how to improve outcomes in home infusion by creating a practice focused on the patient experience.

    Patients have been receiving infusion therapy in their homes since the 1980s. However, the demand and volume of therapies that can be infused in the home continues to rise. Many of these infusions can be administered by the patient. This webinar will explore the importance of the patient experience in improving overall health outcomes in patients who receive home infusion by examining case studies and observations from the field. The first-ever Certified Patient Experience Professional in the pharmacy field, Amanda Walker, BSN, RN, CPXP, will share what she has learned about how to improve outcomes in home infusion by creating a practice focused on the patient experience. 

    LEARNING OUTCOMES
    At the end of this presentation, learners will be able to: 
    • Identify the role of home infusion nurses in infusion therapy education, administration, and management. 
    • Explain verbally how they will use the tools discussed to evaluate their patients’ ability to infuse themselves safely or if a caregiver needs to be involved.
    • Define patient experience (PX) and describe how they will incorporate the fundamentals of PX into their nursing practice, regardless of the care setting.  

    Amanda Walker, BSN, RN, CPXP

    Senior Vice President, Patient Experience

    Amanda Walker, BSN, RN, CPXP, is the senior vice president, patient experience at Heritage Biologics, a home infusion and specialty pharmacy located just outside of Kansas City. An industry leader in patient experience, Amanda became the first Certified Patient Experience Professional (CPXP) in the pharmacy sphere and created the first patient-experience program in a pharmacy. As a member of the executive leadership team at Heritage Biologics, Amanda has woven patient experience into every element of the pharmacy’s program, unifying quality, safety, and experience strategies to improve overall patient outcomes. Before joining Heritage Biologics, she worked at the University of Kansas Hospital, serving the hematology/oncology, blood and marrow transplant inpatient population as a nurse, and later, as a clinical nurse educator, overseeing the education of more than 150 nurses and staff. Amanda’s passion for treating the whole patient has led her to become involved as a board member with the Kansas City chapter of HopeKids, a nonprofit organization which focuses on providing activities and support to children with life-threatening medical conditions and their families. 

    CRNI® Recerts: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit

    Contact Hours/CE Credits: This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours

  • Infusion Nurses’ Role During Disasters

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Recorded On: 04/25/2018

    Disasters are becoming a more common occurrence in our society. Natural disasters such as hurricanes and floods, man-made disasters such as mass shootings and workplace violence, and emerging pathogens like Ebola and SARS all touch the profession of nursing. Nursing has historically responded to society’s call for help during disasters. Infusion nurses play a pivotal role in providing patient care as part of an interdisciplinary team and may be called upon to practice in less familiar settings in the event of a disaster. This presentation explores nurses’ moral obligations during disasters from professional and individual perspectives.

    Disasters are becoming a more common occurrence in our society. Natural disasters such as hurricanes and floods, man-made disasters such as mass shootings and workplace violence, and emerging pathogens like Ebola and SARS all touch the profession of nursing. Nursing has historically responded to society’s call for help during disasters. Infusion nurses play a pivotal role in providing patient care as part of an interdisciplinary team and may be called upon to practice in less familiar settings in the event of a disaster. This presentation explores nurses’ moral obligations during disasters from professional and individual perspectives. 

    Learning Outcomes:  At the conclusion of this presentation, learners will be able to:
    1. Explicate the ethical requisite to respond to disaster. 
    2. Understand their personal requisite to respond to disaster.
    3. Weigh risks and responsibilities when personally called upon to respond to a disaster.
    4. Identify how the ANA nurses’ code of ethics directs response during a disaster.
    5. Describe the ANA position statement on risk and responsibility and understand how this document guides nursing’s response during disaster. 

    ​Donna Casey, DNP, MBE, BSN

    ANA Ethics and Human Rights Advisory Board Chair

    Donna Casey, DNP, MBE, BSN, has more than 30 years of professional nursing experience in clinical practice, education, and leadership, and is a nationally recognized leader in clinical biomedical ethics. She currently chairs the American Nurses Association’s ANA Ethics and Human Rights Advisory Board, which addresses ethical issues at the state, national, and international levels. Dr. Casey earned a BSN from the University of Virginia, a master’s degree in bioethics from University of Virginia, and a DNP from the University of Nevada. 

    CRNI® Recerts: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit

    Contact Hours/CE Credits: This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours

  • Out on a Limb: Peripheral Infusion Therapy

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Each year in the Unites States, it’s estimated that more than 150 million short peripheral catheters and 600,000 midline catheters are used to administer everything from antibiotics to parenteral nutrition. Is the peripheral route the best choice for your infusion therapy patient? Indications, advantages, and disadvantages for peripheral infusion therapy are discussed.

    Each year in the Unites States, it’s estimated that more than 150 million short peripheral catheters and 600,000 midline catheters are used to administer everything from antibiotics to parenteral nutrition. Is the peripheral route the best choice for your infusion therapy patient? Indications, advantages, and disadvantages for peripheral infusion therapy are discussed.

    Sharon Spencer, DNP, MSN, RN

    Clinical Assistant Professor

    Sharon Spencer, DNP, MSN, RN, is a clinical assistant professor at the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH), College of Nursing. Her nursing career spans 33 years. Prior to her career in academia, she worked in numerous critical care areas, in outpatient services, on infusion therapy teams, and in specialty clinics, in particular urology and dermatology. Dr. Spencer earned a nursing degree from Charity School of Nursing at Delgado Community College in New Orleans, an MSN in health care systems management from Loyola University (New Orleans), and a DNP from UAH. She is a 2018 recipient of the NLN Alabama League of Nursing Lamplighter award for innovation in teaching with students, faculty and community partners. Her research interests include clinical practice issues such as infusion therapy. She is a member of Sigma and Phi Kappa Phi Honor societies.

    Guest: 
    Sharon Spencer, DNP, RN
    Clinical Assistant Professor, University of Alabama

    Each year in the Unites States, it’s estimated that more than 150 million short peripheral catheters and 600,000 midline catheters are used to administer everything from antibiotics to parenteral nutrition. Is the peripheral route the best choice for your infusion therapy patient? Indications, advantages, and disadvantages for peripheral infusion therapy are discussed.


    Information and resources:

    Spencer S, Gilliam P. The KISSSS method of peripheral I.V. catheter care. Nursing. 2017;47(6):64. doi: 10.1097/01.NURSE.0000516241.97830.41.

    Spencer S, Gilliam P. Teaching patients about their short peripheral I.V. catheters. Nursing. 2015;45(2):64. doi: 10.1097/01.NURSE.0000459801.33205.6a.

  • The 5 Why's of Injectable Medication Shortages

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Recorded On: 03/28/2018

    At the end of the presentation, attendees will be able to identify the impact of injectable medication shortages on patient care and learn strategies for best practices.

    Medication shortages, especially injectable drugs, cause significant risks to patients from both safety and clinical treatment aspects. Clinicians are faced with daily drug shortages in practice settings that necessitate restrictions, rationing, and sometimes rapid changes in therapies. This webinar will explain why drug shortages occur, identify the key stakeholders in drug shortage management, describe the current drug shortages, and offer predictions on how long current injectable medication shortages may last. Dr. Pasko will also discuss the impact to patient care as a result of these shortages and provide strategies for best practices.

    Learning Outcome:

    At the end of the presentation, attendees will be able to identify the impact of injectable medication shortages on patient care and learn strategies for best practices.

    Deborah A. Pasko, PharmD, MHA, BPharm

    Director Medication and Safety ASHP

    Deborah Pasko, PharmD, MHA, BPharm, is the director of medication safety and quality at the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. She earned a BPharm from Ohio Northern University, an MHA from Walden University and a PharmD from Idaho State University. She has training and experience in a number of pharmacy practices, including pediatrics, critical care, medication safety, and process improvement. In 2009, she transitioned to hospital administration at the University of Michigan, where she chaired the Pediatric Medication Safety committee and advised the adult committee until2014. She has led pediatric and adult initiatives focused on adverse drug events (ADE) and health care-acquired infection prevention, in addition to serving as lead pharmacist for safety technology implementations, including smart infusion devices and Epic EHR. Dr. Pasko’s professional interests include intravenous and oral liquid standardization, all pillars of the national ADE action plan, antimicrobial resistance and stewardship, opioid stewardship, safety technology solutions, drug shortages and population health initiatives.

    CRNI® Recerts: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit

    Contact Hours/CE Credits: This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours

  • Episode 6: Central Vascular Access Device Malposition

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    CVAD malposition refers to the suboptimal location of the tip of the catheter. Signs and symptoms range from the sound of “gurgling” in a patient’s ear to pneumo- or hemothorax. Malposition can lead to other complications including infiltration or extravasation. In this final episode of the series, it’s all about location, location, location.

    CVAD malposition refers to the suboptimal location of the tip of the catheter. Signs and symptoms range from the sound of “gurgling” in a patient’s ear to pneumo- or hemothorax. Malposition can lead to other complications including infiltration or extravasation. In this final episode of the series, it’s all about location, location, location.

    Crystal Miller, MA, BSN, CRNI®, NE-BC

    Nurse Manager

    Crystal Miller, MA, BSN, CRNI®, NE-BC is the nurse manager of the IV Therapy Department in the Outpatient Infusion and Mandell Multiple Sclerosis Centers at St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center in Hartford, Connecticut. She has more than 30 years’ experience in infusion nursing. Crystal served as president of the Infusion Nurses Society from 1998 to 1999 and chaired the Infusion Nurses Certification Corporation from 2011 to 2013. 

    Guest: Crystal Miller, MA, BSN, RN, CRNI®

                   Nurse Manager, St. Frances Hospital and Medical Center, Hartford, CT


    CVAD malposition refers to the suboptimal location of the tip of the catheter. Signs and symptoms range from the sound of “gurgling” in a patient’s ear to pneumo- or hemothorax. Malposition can lead to other complications including infiltration or extravasation. In this final episode of the series, it’s all about location, location, location.

  • Episode 5: Air and Catheter Embolisms

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Our series continues with a look at two complications that while, infrequent, can have devastating consequences. Signs and symptoms can be nonspecific, but early recognition and prompt intervention are crucial to decrease the chances of harm to the patient.

    Our series continues with a look at two complications that while, infrequent, can have devastating consequences. Signs and symptoms can be nonspecific, but early recognition and prompt intervention are crucial to decrease the chances of harm to the patient. 

    Mark Hunter, BSN, RN, CRNI®, VA-BC

    Medical Affairs Manager

    Mark R. Hunter, BSN, RN, CRNI®, VA-BC, is a medical affairs manager at BD, where he focuses on medical device development, risk management, patient safety, and regulatory agency communications. He began his corporate nursing career at Baxter in 2007, where he helped drive the launch of multiple new products. A registered nurse for 27 years, Mark specialized in the fields of critical care and infusion nursing before joining industry. An active INS member, Mark has contributed to the development of INS’ Infusion Nursing Standards of Practice (2011), sessions for its annual meeting, and the CRNI® certification exam. Mark is also an editorial reviewer for the Journal of Infusion Nursing. 

    Guest: Mark Hunter, BSN, RN, CRNI®, VA-BC
                   Medical Affairs Manager, BD

    Our series continues with a look at two complications that while, infrequent, can have devastating consequences. Signs and symptoms can be nonspecific, but early recognition and prompt intervention are crucial to decrease the chances of harm to the patient. 

    References:
    Alexander M, Corrigan A, Gorski L, Phillips L.  
    Core Curriculum for Infusion Nursing. 4th ed. Wolters Kluwer Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. 2014

    Brenda L Natal, MD, MPH; Chief Editor: Erik D Schraga, MD. Venous Air Embolism Dec 2017 https://emedicine.medscape.com...
     
    Robert Wilkins, Martin Unverdorben. Accidental intravenous infusion of air, JIN 2012 pg 404-408. DOI: 10.1097/NAN.0b013e31827079fe 

    Complications of Peripheral Venous Access Devices: Prevention, Detection, and Recovery Strategies Crit Care Nurse April 1, 2017 37:e1-e14 
    http://ccn.aacnjournals.org/co...

    Something’s Missing: Peripheral Intravenous Catheter Fracture
    doi: 10.3122/jabfm.2013.06.130097 J Am Board Fam Med November-December 2013 vol. 26 no. 6 805-806
    http://www.jabfm.org/content/2...

    Fibel, Kenton H., et al. “Pressurized Intravenous Fluid Administration in the Professional Football Player.” Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, vol. 25, no. 4, 2015, doi:10.1097/jsm.0000000000000150.

    Macklin, D. (1999). What’s physics got to do with it. a review of the physical prinicples of fluid administration. Journal of Vascular Access Devices, 7-11.

  • Virtual Conference: Infusion Nursing: Why We Do What We Do

    Contains 3 Component(s), 4.00 credits offered

    More than 90% of all hospitalized patients require some form of infusion therapy, and a growing number of patients are receiving infusion therapy outside an acute care setting. Today’s track will feature expert infusion nurses who will answer common practice questions, as well as provide foundational information about fluids and electrolytes and pain management strategies.

    Infusion Nursing: Why We Do What We Do

    More than 90% of all hospitalized patients require some form of infusion therapy, and a growing number of patients are receiving infusion therapy outside an acute care setting. Today’s track will feature expert infusion nurses who will answer common practice questions, as well as provide foundational information about fluids and electrolytes and pain management strategies. 

    LIVE with Infusion Nurse Experts!

    8:00 - 9:00 AM EDT
    • Description of how “Ask INS” online portal works
    • Review of top 10 most frequently asked questions
    • Participant submission of questions included

    Pain Management: The Role of Infusion Nurses in Inpatient and Ambulatory Settings

    9:00 - 10:00 AM EDT
    • Importance of pain control for patients
    • World Health Organization acknowledgement of pain relief as basic human right
    • Presentation of evidence-based solutions for pain management 

    Principles of Infusion Therapy: Fluids

    10:30 - 11:30 AM EDT
    • Understanding fluid and electrolyte balance
    • Review of basics
    • Assessment of fluid and measurement of electrolyte needs

    Electrolytes: Opposites Attract

    11:30 AM - 12:30 PM EDT
    • Application of fluid and electrolyte administration
    • Medications that disrupt balance
    • Effective delivery of intravenous medication

    Infusion Therapy from Hospital to Home - Bridging the Gap

    1:00 - 2:00 PM EDT
    • Home infusion therapy continues to grow and expand in scope
    • The process of transitioning the patient requiring home infusion therapy was mapped                   
    • The work of AAMI focusing on the hospital to home transition is described
    Contact Hours

    This entire program has been approved for 4 contact hours. Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: May 22, 2021

    CRNI® Recertifications Units

    This entire program has been approved for 10 CRNI® recertification units.
    *Note: Participants who attend the live version of this program at INS 2018 in Cleveland, OH are not eligible to receive contact hours or CRNI® recertification units through this online program.

    LIVE with Infusion Nurse Experts!

    Britt Meyer, PhD, RN, CRNI®, VA-BC, NE-BC
    Denise Harper, MSN, RN, CRNI®, ACNS-BC
    Karen Johnson, MSN, MBA, RN, CRNI®, CPUI, VA-BC

    8:00 – 9:00 AM EDT

    "Ask INS" on the INS website, ins1.org, is where visitors can submit infusion-related questions or browse the answers to queries submitted by other infusion nurses. During this session, attendees will have an opportunity to learn how "Ask INS" works, review the current Top 10 most frequently asked questions and their answers, and have their own questions answered. Use the live chat function on the side of your screen to submit a question to be addressed during this session.

    Learning Outcomes: After the session, attendees will be able to discuss the answers to frequently asked questions of infusion nurses based on the Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice (2016) and current clinical practice.


    Pain Management: The Role of Infusion Nurses in Inpatient and Ambulatory Settings

    Carolyn Ruffing, MS, BSN, RN, OCN®
    9:00 - 10:00 AM EDT

    Much has been written in the past two decades about the importance of pain control for all patients. The World Health Organization has even acknowledged pain relief as a basic human right. Unfortunately, pain continues to be a complex and unresolved barrier to achieving desired outcomes in the U.S. health care system. This presentation will provide infusion nurses with evidence-based information to improve patient outcomes and for effective pain management and assessment.

    Learning Outcomes: After the session, attendees will be able to describe correctly the pathophysiology of pain and its impact on patients. They also will be able to cite the use of evidence-based practice in pain management.


    Principles of Infusion Therapy: Fluids

    Christie Heinzman, MSN, RN, PNP-AC
    10:30 AM - 11:30 PM EDT

    Understanding fluid and electrolyte balance is an essential, fundamental stepping stone in the care of patients receiving intravenous therapies. However, it is often overlooked or forgotten in our high-technological functions. This session will review the basics to strengthen attendees' knowledge of the assessment of fluid and the measurement of electrolyte needs and changes. 

    Learning Outcomes: After the session, attendees will be able to name three techniques to assess fluid needs and two electrolytes, and how to assess for their deprivation.


    Electrolytes: Opposites Attract

    Brian W Dubiel, RD, LD, CNSC
    11:30 AM - 12:30 PM EDT

    The values are understood and the problem has been assessed. Now what? This session will focus on the application of fluid and electrolyte administration, and medications that may disrupt this delicate balance. It also will enhance attendees' knowledge of how to deliver intravenous medication effectively and efficiently, while establishing and maintaining this critical physiologic balance.

    Learning Outcomes: After the session, attendees will be able to describe the scope of practice and 4 components of a model for safe home infusion therapy. They will also be able to discuss critical issues to address during the transition from acute to home care.


    Infusion Therapy from Hospital to Home - Bridging the Gap

    Lisa Gorski, MS, RN, HHCNS-BC, CRNI®, FAAN
    1:00 - 2:00 PM EDT

    The practice of home infusion therapy continues to grow and expand in scope. Based upon work done with the AAMI Foundation, the process of transitioning the patient requiring home infusion therapy was mapped from the hospital to the time of discharge from home care. Gaps and opportunities for process improvement were then identified. During this presentation, an overview of selected home infusion therapy issues are highlighted, a model for safe home infusion therapy is presented, and the work of AAMI focusing on the hospital to home transition is described.

    Learning Outcomes: After the session, attendees will be able to describe the scope of practice and 4 components of a model for safe home infusion therapy. They will also be able to discuss critical issues to address during the transition from acute to home care.


    Contact Hours

    This entire program has been approved for 4 contact hours. Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: May 22, 2021

    CRNI® Recertification Units

    This entire program has been approved for 10 CRNI® recertification units.

    *Note: Participants who attend the live version of this program at INS 2018 in Cleveland, OH are not eligible to receive contact hours or CRNI® recertification units through this online program.

    Britt Meyer, PhD, RN, CRNI®, VA-BC, NE-BC

    Duke University Hospital

    Britt Meyer, PhD, RN, CRNI®, VABC, NEBC, a past president of INS, is nurse manager operations of the Duke University Hospital vascular access team. She teaches and speaks nationally and internationally on infusion-related topics, and recently completed a research study examining the patient experience related to peripherally inserted central catheter deep vein thrombosis.

    Denise Harper, MSN, RN, CRNI®, ACNS-BC

    Vidant Medical Center

    Denise Harper, MSN, RN, CRNI®, ACNS-BC, is a clinical nurse specialist, infusion and adult medicine, at Vidant Medical Center. She has been a nurse for more than 30 years, many of those years working in the field of home infusion. A CRNI® for more than 20 years, she spent 4 years on INS' National Council on Education. She serves as Vidant Medical Center's infusion content expert and uses INS' Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice to keep policies up-to-date.

    Karen Johnson, MSN, MBA, RN, CRNI®, CPUI, VA-BC

    MobilexUSA

    Karen T. Johnson, MSN, MBA, RN, CRNI®, CPUI, VA-BC, is clinical director of vascular access for MobilexUSA. She has worked in infusion nursing for the past 15 years, and has experience as a neonatal and adult intensive care nurse. Active in the Infusion Nurses Society and the Association for Vascular Access, she has served both at the local and national levels. Ms. Johnson has been the recipient of the South Carolina Nurses Foundation's Palmetto Gold award, which is presented to nurses who exemplify excellence in nursing practice and commitment to the nursing profession.

    Carolyn Ruffing, MS, BSN, RN, OCN®

    University of Rochester Medical Center's Wilmot Cancer Institute

    Carolyn Ruffing, MS, BSN, RN, OCN®, is an oncology nurse with the University of Rochester Medical Center's Wilmot Cancer Institute (WCI). Experienced in inpatient oncology, palliative and hospice care, infusion therapy, and outpatient clinics, she currently is  developing a Nurse Navigator program for WCI. Her specialty is pain and symptom management. Cochair of the WCI pain committee, she also lectures on pain, with a focus on the oncology environment.

    Christie Heinzman, RN, MSN, PNP-AC

    Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center

    Christie Heinzman, MSN, RN, PNP-AC, is a pediatric nurse practitioner in the division of gastroenterology, hepatology, and nutrition at Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center. She has 5 years of experience as a nurse practitioner and more than 12 years of experience in gastrointestinal nursing. She expects to complete a doctor of nursing practice degree in 2018.

    Brian William Dubiel, RD, LD, CNSC

    Cleveland Clinic

    Brian W Dubiel, RD, LD, CNSC, is an advanced practice clinical dietitian at the Cleveland Clinic, where he has practiced for 10 years. A member of the Cleveland Clinic’s nutrition support team, he leads daily physician bedside rounds for patients receiving total parenteral nutrition. He also provides nutrition therapy to patients in the intensive care setting. He is currently an investigator in two research studies.

    Lisa Gorski, MS, RN, HHCNS-BC, CRNI®, FAAN

    Wheaton Franciscan Home Health & Hospice

    Lisa works as a clinical nurse specialist at Wheaton Franciscan Home Health & Hospice in Milwaukee and has over 30 years of experience in infusion nursing. She received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee College of Nursing. She is the author of over 40 journal articles and has authored three books on the topic of home infusion therapy. She is the coauthor of the 2014 Manual of IV Therapeutics: An Evidence-Based Practice for Infusion Therapy. She was an editor for the Infusion Nurses Society’s 2010 textbook Infusion Nursing in Clinical Practice: An Evidence-Based Approach and the Core Curriculum for Infusion Nursing, 4th edition. She served as INS president from 2007 to 2008 and chaired the 2011 and 2016 INS Standards of Practice committees. In 2006, she was inducted as a Fellow into the American Academy of Nursing. Lisa was honored as the INCC CRNI® of the Year in 2003 and as the 2011 CNS of the Year by the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists.

  • Advocating Empowerment: A Conversation With INS 2018 Keynote Speaker Elizabeth Smart

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Like many moms, her typical day starts with a personal wake-up call from her toddler daughter, tending to her infant son, taking a quick run with her dogs, then tackling the day’s to-do list. Elizabeth Smart is a typical mom with an inconceivable story. Abducted at knife point from her home in 2002 at age 14, then raped, drugged, and abused for 9 months, the story of Elizabeth Smart’s ordeal gripped the nation. Now an advocate for survivors of sexual assault and other types of abuse, Elizabeth talks about recovering from her traumatic experience and how empowerment is a key component to victims’ survival.

    Like many moms, her typical day starts with a personal wake-up call from her toddler daughter, tending to her infant son, taking a quick run with her dogs, then tackling the day’s to-do list. Elizabeth Smart is a typical mom with an inconceivable story. Abducted at knife point from her home in 2002 at age 14, then raped, drugged, and abused for 9 months, the story of Elizabeth Smart’s ordeal gripped the nation. Now an advocate for survivors of sexual assault and other types of abuse, Elizabeth talks about recovering from her traumatic experience and how empowerment is a key component to victims’ survival.

    Interviewer: Leslie Nikou, INS Associate Managing Editor

    Guest: Elizabeth Smart
               Author/Speaker/Survivor
               INS 2018 Keynote Speaker 

    Like many moms, her typical day starts with a personal wake-up call from her toddler daughter, tending to her infant son, taking a quick run with her dogs, then tackling the day’s to-do list. Elizabeth Smart is a typical mom with an inconceivable story. Abducted at knife point from her home in 2002 at age 14, then raped, drugged, and abused for 9 months, the story of Elizabeth Smart’s ordeal gripped the nation. Now an advocate for survivors of sexual assault and other types of abuse, Elizabeth talks about recovering from her traumatic experience and how empowerment is a key component to victims’ survival.

    Information and resources:
    www.elizabethsmart.com

  • Episode 4: Vascular Access Device Occlusion

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Occlusions can affect any vascular access device at any point during the course of treatment. We’ll identify various occlusions and what can be done to manage this potentially significant complication in both peripheral and central VADs.

    Occlusions can affect any vascular access device at any point during the course of treatment. We’ll identify various occlusions and what can be done to manage this potentially significant complication in both peripheral and central VADs.

    Guest: Maria Santini BSN, RN, VA-BC


    Occlusions can affect any vascular access device at any point during the course of treatment. We’ll identify various occlusions and what can be done to manage this potentially significant complication in both peripheral and central VADs.