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  • Virtual Conference: Advancing Oncology Practice

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Event on 11/01/2019 at 12:00 PM (EDT)

    The One-Day Program provides educational offerings with a concentrated focus on current oncology-related topics. These sessions are applicable to clinicians who care for patients in a variety of care settings including, acute care, outpatient and long-term care facilities, physicians’ offices, and patients’ homes. Attendees will have the opportunity to learn from clinical experts who specialize in oncology practice.

    Advancing Oncology Practice

    The One-Day Program provides educational offerings with a concentrated focus on current oncology-related topics. These sessions are applicable to clinicians who care for patients in a variety of care settings including, acute care, outpatient and long-term care facilities, physicians’ offices, and patients’ homes. Attendees will have the opportunity to learn from clinical experts who specialize in oncology practice.

    Implementing and Adhering to a Chemotherapy Exposure Management Program

    9:00 - 10:00 AM PDT
    • Administration of chemotherapy expansion beyond inpatient oncology units
    • Importance of adherence to policies and procedures specific to chemotherapy exposure
    • USP General Chapter <800> standards for handling hazardous drugs in all health care settings

    Benefits and Challenges in the Use of Immunotherapies for Solid Tumors

    10:00 - 11:00 AM PDT
    • Outline cancer biomarkers
    • Comparing immunotherapy to chemotherapy as treatment for cancer
    • Recognition and management of immune-mediated side effects

    Managing Chemotherapy Extravasation Across Transitions of Care: An Oncology CNS-driven Initiative

    11:00 - 12:00 PM PDT
    • Lack of literature related to nurse management of chemotherapy extravasation beyond initial treatment
    • Significant tissue damage following extravasation
    • A formalized process for managing chemotherapy extravasations to increase patient safety and nurse satisfaction.

    Hidden in Plain Sight: Strategies for Accepting and Managing Unconscious Bias

    1:30 PM - 2:30 PM PDT
    • Unconscious biases by oncology providers may contribute to health disparities
    • Evidence-based strategies that center on understanding, assessing, and redirecting unconscious bias
    • Implicit bias can occur in health care settings through micro-aggressions and micro-invalidations.

    Genetic Testing in Cancer Patients

    2:30 PM - 3:30 PM PDT
    • Importance of genetic testing for individuals with personal or family history of susceptibility
    • Evaluation of patients for referral for genetic testing and counseling.
    • Testing results such as genetic mutations and the mechanism of carcinogenesis can aid in diagnosis and management of the disease.
    Contact Hours

    This entire program has been approved for 5 contact hours. Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: November 1, 2022

    CRNI® Recertifications Units

    This entire program has been approved for 10 CRNI® recertification units and meets the INS Meeting criteria.
    *Note: Participants who attend the live version of this program at the 2019 National Academy in San Diego, CA are not eligible to receive contact hours or CRNI® recertification units through this online program.

    Implementing and Adhering to a Chemotherapy Exposure Management Program

    Marianne Valentine, BSN, RN, CRNI®
    9:00 - 10:00 AM PDT

    Administration of chemotherapy has expanded well beyond inpatient oncology units. Chemotherapy is commonly administered in outpatient and long-term care facilities, physicians' offices, and patients' homes. Policies and procedures specific to chemotherapy exposure must be adhered to in order to limit the short-term and long-term consequences of exposure. USP General Chapter <800> provides standards for handling hazardous drugs in all health care settings to protect patients, caregivers, and health care personnel from potential exposure and harm.

    Learning Outcomes:

    After the session, attendees will: 

    1. Discuss potential toxicities of chemotherapy drugs.  
    2. List common sites where chemotherapy is administered.  
    3. Discuss USP <800> standards for hazardous drugs.  
    4. Discuss PPE, safe handling and waste disposal of chemotherapy drugs.  
    5. Discuss implications for alternate sites including and caregivers.

    Benefits and Challenges in the Use of Immunotherapies for Solid Tumors

    Glenda L Kaminski, PhD, MS, APRN, AOCN, CRNI®
    10:00 - 11:00 AM PDT

    This presentation will outline cancer biomarkers and compare immunotherapy to chemotherapy as treatment for cancer. Information about recognition and management of immune-mediated side effects related to immunotherapy, such as cutaneous, gastrointestinal, renal, respiratory, endocrine, and neurological effects will also be discussed.

    Learning Outcomes:

    After the session, attendees will:

    1. Recognize the differences in mechanism of action between checkpoint inhibitors and chemotherapy  
    2. Identify the most common adverse events for checkpoint inhibition in solid tumors and review the recommended management strategies  
    3. Outline the signs and symptoms that nurses need to be aware of to facilitate prompt identification and treatment of immune-related adverse events.

    Managing Chemotherapy Extravasation Across Transitions of Care: An Oncology CNS-driven Initiative

    Christina Colvin, MSN, APRN, AOCNS, CRNI®
    Diana Karius, MS, APRN, CNS, AOCN
    11:00 AM - 12:00 PM PDT

    Literature related to nurse management of chemotherapy extravasation beyond initial treatment is lacking. Following extravasation, tissue damage can be significant when patients return for their regular appointment. Two oncology clinical nurse specialists designed a formal consult process to observe, manage, and make recommendations for follow-up. Since implementation of the process, multiple requests for consultations have been received. A formalized process for managing chemotherapy extravasations increases patient safety and nurse satisfaction.

    Learning Outcomes:

    After the session, attendees will be able to describe the necessity of a formalized process for the management of chemotherapy extravasations.


    Hidden in Plain Sight: Strategies for Accepting and Managing Unconscious Bias

    Paula Schultz MSN-ED, RN, CRNI®
    1:30 - 2:30 PM PDT

    Unconscious biases held by oncology providers may contribute to health disparities. This interactive presentation provides evidence-based strategies that center on understanding, assessing, and redirecting unconscious bias through focused debriefing, categorized management strategies, and perspective taking. Participants will learn how implicit bias can occur in health care settings through micro-aggressions and micro-invalidations.

    Learning Outcomes:

    After the session, attendees will: 

    1. Identify their personal level of unconscious bias awareness, its potential effect upon patient communication, and strategies for managing their perspective  
    2. Analyze effects of unconscious bias on cancer care disparities and subtle ways bias manifests in the patient/provider relationship  
    3. Compare and contrast stages of unconscious bias awareness and associated management strategies  
    4. Apply creative expression to gain insight, empathy, and relational awareness of patient situations.

    Genetic Testing in Cancer Patients

    Jane Lacovara, MSN, CNS-BC, CMSRN
    2:30 - 3:30 PM PDT

    Indications for genetic testing include individuals who have a personal or family history of genetic susceptibility. This session will discuss the importance of genetic testing in cancer treatment protocols as well as evaluate the need for referring patients for genetic testing and counseling. Attendees will also learn how the results of the testing, such as genetic mutations and the mechanism of carcinogenesis will aid in diagnosis or influence the medical or surgical management of the disease.

    Learning Outcomes:

    After the session, attendees will:

    1. Evaluate the need for patient referral for genetic testing and counseling 
    2. Define penetrance as it relates to genetic mutations 
    3. State the importance of genetic testing in cancer treatment protocols

    Marianne Valentine, BSN, RN, CRNI®

    Nurse Manager, PharmaCare Infusion Services

    Marianne Valentine, BSN, RN, CRNI®, is a Nurse Manager with PharmaCare Infusion Services. She has more than 33 years experience in infusion nursing, with 25 years in home infusion.  She is a part-time instructor at Allegany College of Maryland, teaching infusion therapy to nursing students. Marianne has been a member of  INS since 1990, and a speaker at the INS annual meeting in 2000. She was a contributing editor for Plummer’s Principles & Practice of Intravenous Therapy, 8th edition.

    Glenda L Kaminski, PhD, MS, APRN, AOCN, CRNI®

    Clinical Nurse Specialist, Oncology, Lakeland Regional Health

    Glenda L Kaminski, PhD, MS, APRN, AOCN, CRNI®, has been a medical oncology nurse for 35 years, 25 of which were spent as a Clinical Nurse Specialist. Dr. Kaminski teaches nurses that are new to oncology about the cancer journey and how to support and educate their patients and those patients' families.

    Christina Colvin, MSN, APRN, AOCNS, CRNI®

    Clinical Nurse Specialist, Cleveland Clinic

    Christina Colvin, MSN, APRN, AOCNS, CRNI®, began her nursing career as a clinical nurse on the adult in-patient hematology/oncology unit, expanding to include ambulatory chemotherapy infusion and hematopoietic stem cell transplant after obtaining her AOCNS in 2008.
    Professional contributions include developing education, safety and support initiatives for patients and expert consultation on complex vascular access topics, including assessing extravasations, product evaluation and best practices related to general care of patients with vascular access devices.

    Diana Karius, MS, APRN, CNS, AOCN

    Clinical Nurse Specialist, Hematology/Oncology, Cleveland Clinic

    Diana Karius, MS, APRN, CNS, AOCN is a CNS at the Cleveland Clinic  in hematology/oncology.  She has 40 years of nursing experience, with 26 of those years in Oncology. She has developed curriculum for orientation and coordinates courses in chemotherapy and End of life. Diana is a published author, and in 2011 she received the Mary Nowotny Excellence in Cancer Nursing Education award from the Oncology Nursing Society.

    Paula Schultz MSN-ED, RN, CRNI®

    Clinical Educator - Infusion, University Hospitals Home Care Services

    Paula Schultz MSN-ED, RN, CRNI®, is Infusion Clinical Educator at University Hospitals Home Care Services, Cleveland, Ohio. With background in oncology patient and public education, Paula has presented health literacy/cultural competence training in numerous settings including the 2017 International Cancer Education Conference. She is author of Teaching Strategies to Increase Nursing Student Acceptance and Management of Unconscious Bias, and a recipient of the 2016 Jarvis Joiner Award for Clinical Excellence in Culturally Competent and Sensitive Care.

    Jane Lacovara, MSN, CNS-BC, CMSRN

    Clinical Nurse Specialist, University of Arizona Medical Center

    Jane Lacovara is an advanced practice registered nurse and is board certified as a clinical nurse specialist and expert in oncology at the University of Arizona Medical Center in Tucson, Arizona where she provides consulting services to the high-risk cancer patients in an acute care urban hospital. In her role at the hospital, she focuses on preventing complications in solid-tumor patients for both the oncology and surgery oncology patient populations.

  • Challenges and Management of Infusion Reactions in Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Event on 09/18/2019 at 4:00 PM (EDT)

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), comprised of ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, is a chronic disease influenced by the interaction of the environment, immune system, genetics, and gut microbiota. Currently 1.6 million Americans and 5 million people worldwide are affected by the unpredictable and challenging disease management of IBD. A complete understanding of IBD pathogenesis is unknown and there is no standardized treatment for IBD. Medication therapy options may include biologics, antibiotics, immunomodulators, corticosteroids, and aminosalicylates, requiring the infusion nurse to remain current with evidence-based practice. Listen to this webinar presentation, which focuses on the role of the infusion nurse, to learn more about challenges and developments in the management of IBD.

    Commercial Support: Takeda

    image

    Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD), comprised of ulcerative colitis and Crohn’s disease, is a chronic disease influenced by the interaction of the environment, immune system, genetics, and gut microbiota. Currently 1.6 million Americans and 5 million people worldwide are affected by the unpredictable and challenging disease management of IBD. A complete understanding of IBD pathogenesis is unknown and there is no standardized treatment for IBD. Medication therapy options may include biologics, antibiotics, immunomodulators, corticosteroids, and aminosalicylates, requiring the infusion nurse to remain current with evidence-based practice. Listen to this webinar presentation, which focuses on the role of the infusion nurse, to learn more about challenges and developments in the management of IBD.  

    Learning Outcomes: At the conclusion of this webinar, the learners will be able to: 
    1) Discuss the pathogenesis of IBD and the current treatment options available for patients with IBD 
    2) Identify challenges and ways to manage these challenges when administering infusion medications to patients with IBD

    Rashmi Kumar, MD

    Gastroenterologist, Banner University Medical Center- Phoenix

    Rashmi Kumar, MD is a gastroenterologist at Banner University Medical Center- Phoenix. She finished medical school in India, having graduated fourth in her class, from Patna Medical College, Bihar. Her journey continued with an internal medicine residency at St. Joseph's Hospital and Medical Center, Phoenix. For further training in gastroenterology, she joined the University of Arizona College of Medicine- Phoenix and successfully earned her degree in 2018. Dr. Kumar is particularly focused on inflammatory bowel disease. 

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: September 18, 2022

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • Episode 49: September 4, 2019 - The Other End of the Stethoscope – Discussion with Marcus Engel

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Understanding the patient’s perspective – a discussion with Marcus Engel

    Understanding the patient’s perspective – a discussion with Marcus Engel

    Marcus Engel

    Marcus Engel speaks from experience. It’s not theory, it’s not academic, it’s reality. It’s a journey that isn’t always pretty, but one that’s here to help health care professionals understand their vital role in a patient’s experience.

    Marcus holds a bachelor’s of science in sociology from Missouri State University and a master’s in Narrative Medicine from Columbia University in the City of New York. He has authored four books which are being used by scores of nursing schools and allied health care programs to teach strategies for excellent patient care. 

    Marcus has received an honorary doctorate from the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine and is adjunct faculty at University of Notre Dame where he teaches pre-med students the art of “being with.” 

    His work with the I’m Here Movement is a reminder of presence in healthcare and is changing the culture of care through two simple words. 

    Marcus lives in Orlando, Florida with his wife, Marvelyne (pronounced Marva-lean) and his Seeing Eye dog, Elliott.

    Host: Dawn Berndt, DNP, RN, CRNI® – INS Clinical Education & Publications Manager

    Guest: Marcus Engel

    Are you interested in understanding the health care experience from your patient’s perspective?
    Professional speaker and author Marcus Engel is considered an expert in communicating the patient’s perspective and inspiring health care professionals to excellence. Marcus speaks from experience. After being blinded and suffering catastrophic injuries at the hands of a drunk driver, he endured years of hospitalization, rehab and recovery. Listen in as Marcus shares how we can change the culture of care through two simple words.

    Resources:
    Website: 
    https://marcusengel.com/marcus...

    Books:
    Engel M. The Other End of The Stethoscope: 33 Insights for Excellent Patient Care. Orlando FL: Ella Press; 2006. ISBN:978-0-9720000-1-7
    Engel M. After This: An Inspirational Journey for all the Wrong Reasons. Orlando FL: Ella Press; 2006. ISBN13: 9780972000000
    Engel M. I’m Here: Compassionate Communication in Patient Care. Orlando FL: Ella Press; 2010. ISBN13: 9780972000024
    Engel M., Engel M. Everyday Inspiration. Orlando FL: Ella Press; 2012. ISBN: 978-0-9786784-0-1. 

  • Intravenous Push Medication Safety: Reducing the Risk for Patient Harm

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 08/29/2019

    Infusion therapy is commonplace in many clinical settings, as is the administration of intravenous (IV) push medications. It is essential for nurses to have the knowledge to correctly administer IV push medications and manage the associated challenges. This presentation will examine current evidence-based practice, identify potential risks for errors and complications, and make recommendations for safer practices associated with IV push medication administration.

    Commercial support: Fresenius Kabi

    image


    Infusion therapy is commonplace in many clinical settings, as is the administration of intravenous (IV) push medications. It is essential for nurses to have the knowledge to correctly administer IV push medications and manage the associated challenges. This presentation will examine current evidence-based practice, identify potential risks for errors and complications, and make recommendations for safer practices associated with IV push medication administration.

    Learning Outcomes: At the end of this program, the learner will be able to:
    • Discuss challenges associated with intravenous push medications.
    • Examine current evidence and practice related to intravenous push medication safety.
    • Identify potential risks and complications related to intravenous push medication.
    • Describe best practice for safe IV push medication administration.

    Candy Cross, MSN-Ed, RN

    Adjunct instructor, Chandler-Gilbert Community College

    Candy Cross, MSN-Ed, RN, is an adjunct instructor for Chandler-Gilbert Community College. For the past 5 years she served as the new grad/simulation manager for Dignity Health East Valley, assisting new graduate RNs transition to practice. Prior to that role, she worked in the CVICU for 12 years at a cardiac hospital and 6 years as a clinical education specialist. Candy earned her bachelor’s degree in 2007 from the University of Phoenix and her MSN-Ed from Grand Canyon University in 2011.

    Denise Dion, MSN-Ed, RN, PCCN, CNE

    Nurse Educator, Central Arizona College

    Denise Dion, MSN-Ed, RN, PCCN, CNE, is a nurse educator at Central Arizona College. She has 27 years of experience as a nurse, with the majority of her career spent in cardiac care. She earned her BSN from University of Massachusetts-Boston and an MSN-Ed from the University of Phoenix.  Denise has been working closely with colleagues to bring IV push medication best practice to bedside nurses and nurse faculty throughout Arizona.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: August 29, 2022

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • Episode 48: August 21, 2019 - #ISaidWhatIWant: Why Nurses Should Have Their Own Advance Care Plan

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Advance Care Planning – It’s not just for patients

    Advance Care Planning – It’s not just for patients

    JoAnne Reifsnyder PhD, MSN, MBA, FAAN

    Chief Nursing Officer, Genesis HealthCare

    JoAnne Reifsnyder is a seasoned nurse executive with more than 35 years of experience in clinical practice, administration, consulting, education and research. She is currently the chief nursing officer for Genesis HealthCare headquartered in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, where she has positioned improving palliative and end-of-life care as a strategic priority for the company. Prior to this role, Dr. Reifsnyder was co-founder and partner at Ethos Consulting Group, LLC, a company focused on program development, education/training and research/evaluation to advance end-of-life care. She was formerly the director of the Hospice Program for the VNA of Greater Philadelphia and was director of patient services for Samaritan Hospice in Marlton, New Jersey. Dr. Reifsnyder has authored numerous abstracts, papers, and book chapters. She was also co-author of Nurse’s Law published in 2014 and an editor of a 2011 multi-authored text, Population Health. 

    Host: Dawn Berndt, DNP, RN, CRNI® – INS Infusion Nurse Educator

    Guest: JoAnne Reifsnyder, PhD, MBA, MSN, FAAN

    Nearly 20 nursing specialty organizations representing more than 700,000 nurses have joined together to promote advance care planning (ACP), encouraging nurses to lead by example and establish their own advance care plan. Although most nurses are familiar with ACP, many do not have a plan in place. Listen as JoAnne Reifsnyder, the chair of Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association’s ACP work group discusses the #ISaidWhatIWant initiative and why it’s important for nurses to have their own ACP.  

    Resources:
    Advance Care Planning Initiative - #ISaidWhatIWant  https://advancingexpertcare.or... 

  • Immune Thrombocytopenia: Waiting for the Other Shoe to Drop

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 08/14/2019

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune disease that attacks the body’s platelets. It can have a newly diagnosed and persistent component and can occur in both children and adults. This presentation will discuss newly diagnosed and persistent ITP, diagnosis and treatment for children and adults, and long-term effects for patients with persistent ITP, including psychosocial and financial issues. A case example will follow a patient from diagnosis through various treatments over a 20-year span. At the conclusion of this presentation, the infusion nurse should be able to understand the importance of his or her role in administering IV medications as well as how their interactions affect the patient both short- and long-term.

    Immune thrombocytopenia (ITP) is an autoimmune disease that attacks the body’s platelets. It can have a newly diagnosed and persistent component and can occur in both children and adults. This presentation will discuss newly diagnosed and persistent ITP, diagnosis and treatment for children and adults, and long-term effects for patients with persistent ITP, including psychosocial and financial issues. A case example will follow a patient from diagnosis through various treatments over a 20-year span. At the conclusion of this presentation, the infusion nurse should be able to understand the importance of his or her role in administering IV medications as well as how their interactions affect the patient both short- and long-term.

    Learning Outcomes: At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:
    • Define immune thrombocytopenia and differentiate between newly diagnosed and persistent disease
    • Describe 3 treatments for immune thrombocytopenia
    • Discuss ways health care workers can be sensitive to patients with life altering diseases and provide support to them

    Theresa Thrower, BSN, RN, CRNI®, OCN®

    Home Health Case Manager, Kaiser Permanente

    Theresa has been a nurse for 42 years in various fields with a primary focus in home Infusion and home health. For the last 22 years she has worked specifically with chronically ill patients as well as patients who have been diagnosed with immune thrombocytopenia.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: August 14, 2022

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • Episode 47: August 7, 2019 - IVIG Shortage

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Facing the challenges of managing the IVIG shortage? Listen as IgNS leaders, James Sheets and Luba Sobolevsky discuss the current shortage of IVIG and learn how nurses and care teams can help their patients.

    Facing the challenges of managing the IVIG shortage? Listen as IgNS leaders, James Sheets and Luba Sobolevsky discuss the current shortage of IVIG and learn how nurses and care teams can help their patients.

    James L. Sheets, PharmD

    Founder & CEO, CSI Pharmacy

    James L. Sheets, PharmD, is the founder & CEO of CSI Pharmacy. He is passionate about developing clinical programs that add value to the home care setting for infusion patients. He earned his doctor of pharmacy degree from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, College of Pharmacy. His pharmacy experience includes practice in community, hospital, nuclear, compounding, and the home infusion settings. James has more than 15 years of experience working with immune globulin (Ig) therapy and administration in the home. He is an active member of the Immunoglobulin National Society (IgNS), serving on the Ig therapy standards and leadership committees. He also serves as an advisory board member for the Myasthenia Gravis Hope Foundation, Evolve Biologics, and Vizient’s Alternate Site Pharmacy Committee. 

    ​Luba Sobolevsky, PharmD

    Executive Director, Immunoglobulin National Society

    Luba Sobolevsky, PharmD, is the executive director of Immunoglobulin National Society, a professional association dedicated to the advancement of Ig therapy practice. In her role, Luba oversees development of systematic, advanced education; standards of practice; certification; professional resources; awareness; and advocacy. Luba holds a doctor of pharmacy degree from the University of Southern California. Her expertise spans various fields in health care, including clinical, pharmaceutical, and educational development.

    Host: Dawn Berndt, DNP, RN, CRNI® – INS Infusion Nurse Educator

    Guests: 
    • Luba Sobolevsky, PharmD
    • James L. Sheets, PharmD

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) is an indispensable therapy used to treat a variety of autoimmune, immunodeficiency, hematologic, and other disorders. Ig is a plasma-derived therapy that originates with healthy human donors. Production of Ig can take up to 12 months from the time plasma is donated to the time the product is released to market. Forecasting availability of Ig is complicated by the lengthy production cycle, volume of plasma donations, product demand, as well as regulatory or other manufacturing challenges. Listen as Luba Sobolevsky and James Sheets discuss the current Ig supply issues and learn approaches to safe patient management in this challenging time. 

    Resources:
    https://ig-ns.org/ 
    http://www.donatingplasma.org/ 

  • Episode 46: July 24, 2019 - The Future Role of Nursing

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    As changes in health care venues and chronicity continue to shape the landscape for nursing, what does the nurse’s role look like for the future? Let’s talk about next steps – how will nursing’s role change in the next few years?

    As changes in health care venues and chronicity continue to shape the landscape for nursing, what does the nurse’s role look like for the future? Let’s talk about next steps – how will nursing’s role change in the next few years?

    Adele Webb, PhD, RN, FNAP, FAAN

    Assistant Dean, Capella University

    Adele Webb, PhD, RN, FNAP, FAAN, is an assistant dean at Capella University. Her focus is on international nurse capacity development as it relates to both communicable and non-communicable diseases. She has received extensive funding for her international work and has published her findings in several refereed journals. Adele has contributed to World Health Organization guidelines, testified to the Institute of Medicine, and given testimony to the White House on nursing workforce issues. She continues to collaborate with the WHO as well as the World NCD Congress, and these efforts have helped contribute to improved nurse capacity in health care systems across 43 countries.

    Host: Dawn Berndt, DNP, RN, CRNI® – INS Infusion Nurse Educator

    Guest: Adele A. Webb, PhD, RN, FNAP, FAAN

    As changes in health care venues and chronicity continue to shape the landscape for nursing, what does the nurse’s role look like for the future? The National Academy of Medicine’s report and update on the Future of Nursing 2020 – 2030 suggests opportunities for nurses and ways our profession can contribute to advancing the profession. Join this discussion on advancing the profession of nursing in an era of rapid transition. Listen as Adele Webb discusses the 5 areas where nurses’ roles will change and have an impact on health care. 

    Resources:
    National Academy of Medicine – The Future of Nursing 2020 – 2030: https://nam.edu/publications/t... 

  • Episode 45: July 10, 2019 - Expand Your Understanding of Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Primary immunodeficiency diseases affect more than 250,000 people in the United States. Learn how the Immune Deficiency Foundation is dedicated to improving the diagnosis, treatment, and quality of life of persons with primary immunodeficiencies.

    Primary immunodeficiency diseases affect more than 250,000 people in the United States. Learn how the Immune Deficiency Foundation is dedicated to improving the diagnosis, treatment, and quality of life of persons with primary immunodeficiencies.

    John G. Boyle

    President and CEO of the Immune Deficiency Foundation (IDF)

    John G. Boyle is the president and CEO of the Immune Deficiency Foundation (IDF). He has been instrumental in developing a number of new initiatives for the Foundation, including the IDF Walk for Primary Immunodeficiency (PI) that launched in 2013, and securing more than $4 million in funding that supports vital IDF programs, resources, and research grants. John was diagnosed with a PI disease as an infant, specifically X-linked Agammaglobulinemia. He has received immunoglobulin replacement therapy ever since and has devoted his career to serving nonprofit organizations. John previously served as IDF’s vice president of external relations and has also worked for Children’s National Medical Center and the Platelet Disorder Support Association. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Boston University and master’s degree in nonprofit management from Notre Dame of Maryland University.

    Host: Dawn Berndt, DNP, RN, CRNI® – INS Infusion Nurse Educator

    Guest: John G. Boyle - President & CEO of the Immune Deficiency Foundation

    Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PI) are a group of more than 350 rare, chronic disorders in which part of the body's immune system is missing or functions improperly. There are approximately 250,000 people who are diagnosed with PI in the United States. People with PI can face frequent health problems and often develop serious and debilitating illnesses. Years ago, a diagnosis of a PI meant extremely compromised lives, not just for the patients but for their families as well. Today, with early diagnosis and appropriate therapies, many patients diagnosed with a PI can live healthy, productive lives. Listen as John Boyle, President and CEO of the Immune Deficiency Foundation (IDF), tells his story and describes the work of IDF.

    Founded in 1980, IDF is the national nonprofit patient organization dedicated to improving the diagnosis, treatment and quality of life of persons with PI through advocacy, education and research. 

    Resources:
    https://primaryimmune.org/ 

  • Episode 44: June 26, 2019 - Central Line-associated Bloodstream Infection Surveillance in Home Infusion Therapy

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    The challenge of defining CLABSI in home infusion therapy.

    The challenge of defining CLABSI in home infusion therapy.  

    Sara C. Keller, MD, MPH, MSHP

    Assistant Professor of Medicine Infection Disease, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

    Sara C. Keller, MD, MPH, MSHP, is an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Infectious Disease at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She is also Associate Faculty in the Armstrong Institute of Patient Safety and Quality at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr Keller's research interests focus on improving the quality of care of patients receiving parenteral antibiotics outside the hospital, measures and outcomes among patients with central venous catheters in the home, and improving ambulatory antimicrobial stewardship. 

    Host: Dawn Berndt, DNP, RN, CRNI® – INS Infusion Nurse Educator

    Guest: Sara C. Keller, MD, MPH, MSHP

    Central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) prevention efforts in the acute care setting have reduced national CLABSI rates by 50% over the past 20 years. This increase in patient safety in acute care settings is commendable; however, in the home infusion setting, there is currently no standardized definition for CLABSI, no reporting mechanism, or mandatory reporting required for CLABSI. This is significant in that currently1.24 million courses of home infusion therapy are delivered via central vascular access devices (CVADs) to 829,000 patients each year in the U.S. More importantly, home infusion therapy is increasing at a rate of 8% annually. Listen as Dr. Sara Keller discusses collaborative work to help define CLABSI in the home infusion setting which will foster surveillance methodology and improvement processes in this burgeoning patient care environment.

    Resources:
    1. Keller SC, Alexander MC, Williams D, et al. Perspectives on central-line–associated bloodstream infection surveillance in home infusion therapy. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol, 2019;40(6), 729-731. doi:10.1017/ice.2019.90.
    2. Keller SC, Williams D, Rock C, et al. A new frontier: Central line-associated bloodstream infection surveillance in home infusion therapy. Am J Infect Control, 2018; 46(12), 1419-1421. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajic.2018.05.016.