TALKING IN VEIN PODCASTS are on-demand audio recordings of infusion-related topics. They are available through the INS LEARNING CENTER as well as iTunes.

Podcasts

  • Episode 49: September 4, 2019 - The Other End of the Stethoscope – Discussion with Marcus Engel

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    Understanding the patient’s perspective – a discussion with Marcus Engel

    Understanding the patient’s perspective – a discussion with Marcus Engel

    Marcus Engel

    Marcus Engel speaks from experience. It’s not theory, it’s not academic, it’s reality. It’s a journey that isn’t always pretty, but one that’s here to help health care professionals understand their vital role in a patient’s experience.

    Marcus holds a bachelor’s of science in sociology from Missouri State University and a master’s in Narrative Medicine from Columbia University in the City of New York. He has authored four books which are being used by scores of nursing schools and allied health care programs to teach strategies for excellent patient care. 

    Marcus has received an honorary doctorate from the Philadelphia College of Osteopathic Medicine and is adjunct faculty at University of Notre Dame where he teaches pre-med students the art of “being with.” 

    His work with the I’m Here Movement is a reminder of presence in healthcare and is changing the culture of care through two simple words. 

    Marcus lives in Orlando, Florida with his wife, Marvelyne (pronounced Marva-lean) and his Seeing Eye dog, Elliott.

    Host: Dawn Berndt, DNP, RN, CRNI® – INS Clinical Education & Publications Manager

    Guest: Marcus Engel

    Are you interested in understanding the health care experience from your patient’s perspective?
    Professional speaker and author Marcus Engel is considered an expert in communicating the patient’s perspective and inspiring health care professionals to excellence. Marcus speaks from experience. After being blinded and suffering catastrophic injuries at the hands of a drunk driver, he endured years of hospitalization, rehab and recovery. Listen in as Marcus shares how we can change the culture of care through two simple words.

    Resources:
    Website: 
    https://marcusengel.com/marcus...

    Books:
    Engel M. The Other End of The Stethoscope: 33 Insights for Excellent Patient Care. Orlando FL: Ella Press; 2006. ISBN:978-0-9720000-1-7
    Engel M. After This: An Inspirational Journey for all the Wrong Reasons. Orlando FL: Ella Press; 2006. ISBN13: 9780972000000
    Engel M. I’m Here: Compassionate Communication in Patient Care. Orlando FL: Ella Press; 2010. ISBN13: 9780972000024
    Engel M., Engel M. Everyday Inspiration. Orlando FL: Ella Press; 2012. ISBN: 978-0-9786784-0-1. 

  • Episode 48: August 21, 2019 - #ISaidWhatIWant: Why Nurses Should Have Their Own Advance Care Plan

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    Advance Care Planning – It’s not just for patients

    Advance Care Planning – It’s not just for patients

    JoAnne Reifsnyder PhD, MSN, MBA, FAAN

    Chief Nursing Officer, Genesis HealthCare

    JoAnne Reifsnyder is a seasoned nurse executive with more than 35 years of experience in clinical practice, administration, consulting, education and research. She is currently the chief nursing officer for Genesis HealthCare headquartered in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, where she has positioned improving palliative and end-of-life care as a strategic priority for the company. Prior to this role, Dr. Reifsnyder was co-founder and partner at Ethos Consulting Group, LLC, a company focused on program development, education/training and research/evaluation to advance end-of-life care. She was formerly the director of the Hospice Program for the VNA of Greater Philadelphia and was director of patient services for Samaritan Hospice in Marlton, New Jersey. Dr. Reifsnyder has authored numerous abstracts, papers, and book chapters. She was also co-author of Nurse’s Law published in 2014 and an editor of a 2011 multi-authored text, Population Health. 

    Host: Dawn Berndt, DNP, RN, CRNI® – INS Infusion Nurse Educator

    Guest: JoAnne Reifsnyder, PhD, MBA, MSN, FAAN

    Nearly 20 nursing specialty organizations representing more than 700,000 nurses have joined together to promote advance care planning (ACP), encouraging nurses to lead by example and establish their own advance care plan. Although most nurses are familiar with ACP, many do not have a plan in place. Listen as JoAnne Reifsnyder, the chair of Hospice and Palliative Nurses Association’s ACP work group discusses the #ISaidWhatIWant initiative and why it’s important for nurses to have their own ACP.  

    Resources:
    Advance Care Planning Initiative - #ISaidWhatIWant  https://advancingexpertcare.or... 

  • Episode 47: August 7, 2019 - IVIG Shortage

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    Facing the challenges of managing the IVIG shortage? Listen as IgNS leaders, James Sheets and Luba Sobolevsky discuss the current shortage of IVIG and learn how nurses and care teams can help their patients.

    Facing the challenges of managing the IVIG shortage? Listen as IgNS leaders, James Sheets and Luba Sobolevsky discuss the current shortage of IVIG and learn how nurses and care teams can help their patients.

    James L. Sheets, PharmD

    Founder & CEO, CSI Pharmacy

    James L. Sheets, PharmD, is the founder & CEO of CSI Pharmacy. He is passionate about developing clinical programs that add value to the home care setting for infusion patients. He earned his doctor of pharmacy degree from the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, College of Pharmacy. His pharmacy experience includes practice in community, hospital, nuclear, compounding, and the home infusion settings. James has more than 15 years of experience working with immune globulin (Ig) therapy and administration in the home. He is an active member of the Immunoglobulin National Society (IgNS), serving on the Ig therapy standards and leadership committees. He also serves as an advisory board member for the Myasthenia Gravis Hope Foundation, Evolve Biologics, and Vizient’s Alternate Site Pharmacy Committee. 

    ​Luba Sobolevsky, PharmD

    Executive Director, Immunoglobulin National Society

    Luba Sobolevsky, PharmD, is the executive director of Immunoglobulin National Society, a professional association dedicated to the advancement of Ig therapy practice. In her role, Luba oversees development of systematic, advanced education; standards of practice; certification; professional resources; awareness; and advocacy. Luba holds a doctor of pharmacy degree from the University of Southern California. Her expertise spans various fields in health care, including clinical, pharmaceutical, and educational development.

    Host: Dawn Berndt, DNP, RN, CRNI® – INS Infusion Nurse Educator

    Guests: 
    • Luba Sobolevsky, PharmD
    • James L. Sheets, PharmD

    Immunoglobulin (Ig) is an indispensable therapy used to treat a variety of autoimmune, immunodeficiency, hematologic, and other disorders. Ig is a plasma-derived therapy that originates with healthy human donors. Production of Ig can take up to 12 months from the time plasma is donated to the time the product is released to market. Forecasting availability of Ig is complicated by the lengthy production cycle, volume of plasma donations, product demand, as well as regulatory or other manufacturing challenges. Listen as Luba Sobolevsky and James Sheets discuss the current Ig supply issues and learn approaches to safe patient management in this challenging time. 

    Resources:
    https://ig-ns.org/ 
    http://www.donatingplasma.org/ 

  • Episode 46: July 24, 2019 - The Future Role of Nursing

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    As changes in health care venues and chronicity continue to shape the landscape for nursing, what does the nurse’s role look like for the future? Let’s talk about next steps – how will nursing’s role change in the next few years?

    As changes in health care venues and chronicity continue to shape the landscape for nursing, what does the nurse’s role look like for the future? Let’s talk about next steps – how will nursing’s role change in the next few years?

    Adele Webb, PhD, RN, FNAP, FAAN

    Assistant Dean, Capella University

    Adele Webb, PhD, RN, FNAP, FAAN, is an assistant dean at Capella University. Her focus is on international nurse capacity development as it relates to both communicable and non-communicable diseases. She has received extensive funding for her international work and has published her findings in several refereed journals. Adele has contributed to World Health Organization guidelines, testified to the Institute of Medicine, and given testimony to the White House on nursing workforce issues. She continues to collaborate with the WHO as well as the World NCD Congress, and these efforts have helped contribute to improved nurse capacity in health care systems across 43 countries.

    Host: Dawn Berndt, DNP, RN, CRNI® – INS Infusion Nurse Educator

    Guest: Adele A. Webb, PhD, RN, FNAP, FAAN

    As changes in health care venues and chronicity continue to shape the landscape for nursing, what does the nurse’s role look like for the future? The National Academy of Medicine’s report and update on the Future of Nursing 2020 – 2030 suggests opportunities for nurses and ways our profession can contribute to advancing the profession. Join this discussion on advancing the profession of nursing in an era of rapid transition. Listen as Adele Webb discusses the 5 areas where nurses’ roles will change and have an impact on health care. 

    Resources:
    National Academy of Medicine – The Future of Nursing 2020 – 2030: https://nam.edu/publications/t... 

  • Episode 45: July 10, 2019 - Expand Your Understanding of Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases

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    Primary immunodeficiency diseases affect more than 250,000 people in the United States. Learn how the Immune Deficiency Foundation is dedicated to improving the diagnosis, treatment, and quality of life of persons with primary immunodeficiencies.

    Primary immunodeficiency diseases affect more than 250,000 people in the United States. Learn how the Immune Deficiency Foundation is dedicated to improving the diagnosis, treatment, and quality of life of persons with primary immunodeficiencies.

    John G. Boyle

    President and CEO of the Immune Deficiency Foundation (IDF)

    John G. Boyle is the president and CEO of the Immune Deficiency Foundation (IDF). He has been instrumental in developing a number of new initiatives for the Foundation, including the IDF Walk for Primary Immunodeficiency (PI) that launched in 2013, and securing more than $4 million in funding that supports vital IDF programs, resources, and research grants. John was diagnosed with a PI disease as an infant, specifically X-linked Agammaglobulinemia. He has received immunoglobulin replacement therapy ever since and has devoted his career to serving nonprofit organizations. John previously served as IDF’s vice president of external relations and has also worked for Children’s National Medical Center and the Platelet Disorder Support Association. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Boston University and master’s degree in nonprofit management from Notre Dame of Maryland University.

    Host: Dawn Berndt, DNP, RN, CRNI® – INS Infusion Nurse Educator

    Guest: John G. Boyle - President & CEO of the Immune Deficiency Foundation

    Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PI) are a group of more than 350 rare, chronic disorders in which part of the body's immune system is missing or functions improperly. There are approximately 250,000 people who are diagnosed with PI in the United States. People with PI can face frequent health problems and often develop serious and debilitating illnesses. Years ago, a diagnosis of a PI meant extremely compromised lives, not just for the patients but for their families as well. Today, with early diagnosis and appropriate therapies, many patients diagnosed with a PI can live healthy, productive lives. Listen as John Boyle, President and CEO of the Immune Deficiency Foundation (IDF), tells his story and describes the work of IDF.

    Founded in 1980, IDF is the national nonprofit patient organization dedicated to improving the diagnosis, treatment and quality of life of persons with PI through advocacy, education and research. 

    Resources:
    https://primaryimmune.org/ 

  • Episode 44: June 26, 2019 - Central Line-associated Bloodstream Infection Surveillance in Home Infusion Therapy

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    The challenge of defining CLABSI in home infusion therapy.  

    The challenge of defining CLABSI in home infusion therapy.  

    Sara C. Keller, MD, MPH, MSHP

    Assistant Professor of Medicine Infection Disease, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

    Sara C. Keller, MD, MPH, MSHP, is an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Infectious Disease at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She is also Associate Faculty in the Armstrong Institute of Patient Safety and Quality at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr Keller's research interests focus on improving the quality of care of patients receiving parenteral antibiotics outside the hospital, measures and outcomes among patients with central venous catheters in the home, and improving ambulatory antimicrobial stewardship. 

    Host: Dawn Berndt, DNP, RN, CRNI® – INS Infusion Nurse Educator

    Guest: Sara C. Keller, MD, MPH, MSHP

    Central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) prevention efforts in the acute care setting have reduced national CLABSI rates by 50% over the past 20 years. This increase in patient safety in acute care settings is commendable; however, in the home infusion setting, there is currently no standardized definition for CLABSI, no reporting mechanism, or mandatory reporting required for CLABSI. This is significant in that currently1.24 million courses of home infusion therapy are delivered via central vascular access devices (CVADs) to 829,000 patients each year in the U.S. More importantly, home infusion therapy is increasing at a rate of 8% annually. Listen as Dr. Sara Keller discusses collaborative work to help define CLABSI in the home infusion setting which will foster surveillance methodology and improvement processes in this burgeoning patient care environment.

    Resources:
    1. Keller SC, Alexander MC, Williams D, et al. Perspectives on central-line–associated bloodstream infection surveillance in home infusion therapy. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol, 2019;40(6), 729-731. doi:10.1017/ice.2019.90.
    2. Keller SC, Williams D, Rock C, et al. A new frontier: Central line-associated bloodstream infection surveillance in home infusion therapy. Am J Infect Control, 2018; 46(12), 1419-1421. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajic.2018.05.016.

  • Episode 43: June 12, 2019 - Sickle Cell Disease: My Story

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    Living with sickle cell anemia: what I wish my caregivers understood about me—Kelsey Taylor

    Living with sickle cell anemia: what I wish my caregivers understood about me—Kelsey Taylor

    Kelsey Taylor

    My name is Kelsey Taylor and I am a 25-year-old college student at Wheaton College, MA studying Film and New Media Studies. I was diagnosed with sickle cell anemia at birth, and since then have been advocating for patients nationwide. While struggling with sickle cell, I had my first pain crisis when I was 5 years old, suffered severe daily pain since age 16, and at 19 I ended up doing a bone marrow transplant in an attempt to cure my disease. I engrafted—meaning new, healthy bone marrow was producing normal cells—but my body rejected the healthy marrow and sickle cell disease returned a month later. Since then, I've focused on advocating and sharing my experience with the disease, including creating a podcast to raise awareness of the patient perspective of not just sickle cell, but many chronic illnesses, diseases, and disabilities. The Pill podcast is a new type of health podcast that interviews young adults who have chronic illness, diseases, and disabilities worldwide.

    Host: Dawn Berndt, DNP, RN, CRNI® – INS Infusion Nurse Educator

    Guest: Kelsey Taylor

    Sickle cell disease is a family of blood disorders that affects the hemoglobin molecule in red blood cells, and impacts approximately 80,000 individuals in the United States. It’s the most common inherited blood disorder in this country, affecting 1 in 500 African Americans and 1 in 1000-1400 Hispanic Americans. In sickle cell disease, the hemoglobin molecules are atypical and change into a crescent—or sickle—shape. Those living with sickle cell disease often experience episodes of severe pain and suffer the effects of anemia, which causes extreme fatigue, shortness of breath and, in children, delayed growth and development. In adults, serious complications may include pulmonary hypertension, a form of high blood pressure that affects the blood vessels that supply the lung. 

    Podcast guest Kelsey Taylor describes her experiences living with the disease, and explains how she works to advocate for those who experience sickle cell and other chronic conditions.

    Resources:
    The Pill: http://thepillpodcast.buzzspro...
    The Pill on iTunes at: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/...
    Sickle Cell Disease Association of America: https://www.sicklecelldisease....