TALKING IN VEIN PODCASTS are on-demand audio recordings of infusion-related topics. They are available through the INS LEARNING CENTER as well as iTunes.

Podcasts

  • Episode 45: July 10, 2019 - Expand Your Understanding of Primary Immunodeficiency Diseases

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Primary immunodeficiency diseases affect more than 250,000 people in the United States. Learn how the Immune Deficiency Foundation is dedicated to improving the diagnosis, treatment, and quality of life of persons with primary immunodeficiencies.

    Primary immunodeficiency diseases affect more than 250,000 people in the United States. Learn how the Immune Deficiency Foundation is dedicated to improving the diagnosis, treatment, and quality of life of persons with primary immunodeficiencies.

    John G. Boyle

    President and CEO of the Immune Deficiency Foundation (IDF)

    John G. Boyle is the president and CEO of the Immune Deficiency Foundation (IDF). He has been instrumental in developing a number of new initiatives for the Foundation, including the IDF Walk for Primary Immunodeficiency (PI) that launched in 2013, and securing more than $4 million in funding that supports vital IDF programs, resources, and research grants. John was diagnosed with a PI disease as an infant, specifically X-linked Agammaglobulinemia. He has received immunoglobulin replacement therapy ever since and has devoted his career to serving nonprofit organizations. John previously served as IDF’s vice president of external relations and has also worked for Children’s National Medical Center and the Platelet Disorder Support Association. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Boston University and master’s degree in nonprofit management from Notre Dame of Maryland University.

    Host: Dawn Berndt, DNP, RN, CRNI® – INS Infusion Nurse Educator

    Guest: John G. Boyle - President & CEO of the Immune Deficiency Foundation

    Primary immunodeficiency diseases (PI) are a group of more than 350 rare, chronic disorders in which part of the body's immune system is missing or functions improperly. There are approximately 250,000 people who are diagnosed with PI in the United States. People with PI can face frequent health problems and often develop serious and debilitating illnesses. Years ago, a diagnosis of a PI meant extremely compromised lives, not just for the patients but for their families as well. Today, with early diagnosis and appropriate therapies, many patients diagnosed with a PI can live healthy, productive lives. Listen as John Boyle, President and CEO of the Immune Deficiency Foundation (IDF), tells his story and describes the work of IDF.

    Founded in 1980, IDF is the national nonprofit patient organization dedicated to improving the diagnosis, treatment and quality of life of persons with PI through advocacy, education and research. 

    Resources:
    https://primaryimmune.org/ 

  • Episode 44: June 26, 2019 - Central Line-associated Bloodstream Infection Surveillance in Home Infusion Therapy

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    The challenge of defining CLABSI in home infusion therapy.  

    The challenge of defining CLABSI in home infusion therapy.  

    Sara C. Keller, MD, MPH, MSHP

    Assistant Professor of Medicine Infection Disease, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

    Sara C. Keller, MD, MPH, MSHP, is an Assistant Professor of Medicine in the Division of Infectious Disease at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. She is also Associate Faculty in the Armstrong Institute of Patient Safety and Quality at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. Dr Keller's research interests focus on improving the quality of care of patients receiving parenteral antibiotics outside the hospital, measures and outcomes among patients with central venous catheters in the home, and improving ambulatory antimicrobial stewardship. 

    Host: Dawn Berndt, DNP, RN, CRNI® – INS Infusion Nurse Educator

    Guest: Sara C. Keller, MD, MPH, MSHP

    Central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) prevention efforts in the acute care setting have reduced national CLABSI rates by 50% over the past 20 years. This increase in patient safety in acute care settings is commendable; however, in the home infusion setting, there is currently no standardized definition for CLABSI, no reporting mechanism, or mandatory reporting required for CLABSI. This is significant in that currently1.24 million courses of home infusion therapy are delivered via central vascular access devices (CVADs) to 829,000 patients each year in the U.S. More importantly, home infusion therapy is increasing at a rate of 8% annually. Listen as Dr. Sara Keller discusses collaborative work to help define CLABSI in the home infusion setting which will foster surveillance methodology and improvement processes in this burgeoning patient care environment.

    Resources:
    1. Keller SC, Alexander MC, Williams D, et al. Perspectives on central-line–associated bloodstream infection surveillance in home infusion therapy. Infect Control Hosp Epidemiol, 2019;40(6), 729-731. doi:10.1017/ice.2019.90.
    2. Keller SC, Williams D, Rock C, et al. A new frontier: Central line-associated bloodstream infection surveillance in home infusion therapy. Am J Infect Control, 2018; 46(12), 1419-1421. doi: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajic.2018.05.016.

  • Episode 43: June 12, 2019 - Sickle Cell Disease: My Story

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    Living with sickle cell anemia: what I wish my caregivers understood about me—Kelsey Taylor

    Living with sickle cell anemia: what I wish my caregivers understood about me—Kelsey Taylor

    Kelsey Taylor

    My name is Kelsey Taylor and I am a 25-year-old college student at Wheaton College, MA studying Film and New Media Studies. I was diagnosed with sickle cell anemia at birth, and since then have been advocating for patients nationwide. While struggling with sickle cell, I had my first pain crisis when I was 5 years old, suffered severe daily pain since age 16, and at 19 I ended up doing a bone marrow transplant in an attempt to cure my disease. I engrafted—meaning new, healthy bone marrow was producing normal cells—but my body rejected the healthy marrow and sickle cell disease returned a month later. Since then, I've focused on advocating and sharing my experience with the disease, including creating a podcast to raise awareness of the patient perspective of not just sickle cell, but many chronic illnesses, diseases, and disabilities. The Pill podcast is a new type of health podcast that interviews young adults who have chronic illness, diseases, and disabilities worldwide.

    Host: Dawn Berndt, DNP, RN, CRNI® – INS Infusion Nurse Educator

    Guest: Kelsey Taylor

    Sickle cell disease is a family of blood disorders that affects the hemoglobin molecule in red blood cells, and impacts approximately 80,000 individuals in the United States. It’s the most common inherited blood disorder in this country, affecting 1 in 500 African Americans and 1 in 1000-1400 Hispanic Americans. In sickle cell disease, the hemoglobin molecules are atypical and change into a crescent—or sickle—shape. Those living with sickle cell disease often experience episodes of severe pain and suffer the effects of anemia, which causes extreme fatigue, shortness of breath and, in children, delayed growth and development. In adults, serious complications may include pulmonary hypertension, a form of high blood pressure that affects the blood vessels that supply the lung. 

    Podcast guest Kelsey Taylor describes her experiences living with the disease, and explains how she works to advocate for those who experience sickle cell and other chronic conditions.

    Resources:
    The Pill: http://thepillpodcast.buzzspro...
    The Pill on iTunes at: https://podcasts.apple.com/us/...
    Sickle Cell Disease Association of America: https://www.sicklecelldisease.... 

  • Episode 42: May 15, 2019 - Helping Patients and Families Affected by Chronic Illness

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    Nurses made a difference: a discussion with Jonathan James, CEO, Hope Charities

    Nurses made a difference: a discussion with Jonathan James, CEO, Hope Charities

    Jonathan James

    CEO, Hope Charities

    Jonathan James is the CEO of Hope Charities, a national organization that serves people living with a chronic illness find resources and financial assistance. Jonathan was born with severe Hemophilia A as a spontaneous mutation during a scary time for the hemophilia community. He has had 10 major joint surgeries and innumerable hospital stays. Jonathan is now 38 years old; is married to the love of his life of 15 years, and has 4 beautiful children. With over 10 years of experience as a financial advisor, he now works full-time helping families through difficult seasons find hope in their time of crisis.

    Learn about Hope Charities and Jonathan's story at www.hope-charities.org.

    Host: Dawn Berndt, DNP, RN, CRNI® – INS Infusion Nurse Educator

    Guest: Jonathan James, Chief Executive Officer — Hope Charities

    Hope Charities is a non-profit organization established to be a conduit of hope, strength, and resources for individuals and families facing crisis caused by a chronic illness. Hope Charities helps support families by connecting them to resources and counseling, and also helps them navigate financial assistance programs.

    “Facing a chronic illness can be a long uphill battle that can feel cold and lonely over time. Hope Charities was established to be a friend in the midst of that difficult place that can come along side someone and support them like family. We understand some of the challenges people face and want them to know that they are not alone.” — Jonathan James, CEO, Hope Charities.

    Resources:
    http://www.hope-charities.org/

  • Episode 41: May 1, 2019 - Inside the Lines: Maintaining Professional Boundaries

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    You can be friendly AND professional: understanding professional boundaries. 

    You can be friendly AND professional: understanding professional boundaries. 

    Rachel Colletta, BSN, IgCN, CRNI®, VA-BC

    Director of Professional Education, Life Science Company

    Rachel Colletta, BSN, IgCN, CRNI, VA-BC, is a registered nurse with over 30 years of experience in a variety of specialties including trauma/ICU, medical devices, and home infusion therapy.  The majority of her career has been spent in the infusion industry both as a home infusion nurse and a nurse educator for a manufacturer of plasma products.  Rachel carries certifications in IG therapy, infusion therapy, and vascular access. She has served on planning and educational committees for both IgNS and INS.  Rachel's passion for education and knowledge led her to her most recent role as director of professional education at a life science company.  Rachel is a graduate of LaRoche college and, most recently, Walden University.

    Host: Dawn Berndt, DNP, RN, CRNI® – INS Infusion Nurse Educator

    Guest: Rachel Colletta, BSN, IgCN, CRNI®, VA-BC

    Professional boundaries are the spaces between the nurses’ power and the patients’ vulnerability. In all relationships between health care professionals and patients, there is an imbalance of power. Health care professionals have in-depth access to patients’ sensitive personal information and that puts the professional in a position of power. It is important for health care professionals to understand the boundaries of these relationships and to maintain the space that protects the privacy and dignity of patients under their care. This podcast defines and describes the types of professional boundaries and strategies to maintain therapeutic relationships.

    Resources:

    1. Professional boundaries. National Council of State Boards of Nursing. https://www.ncsbn.org/professional-boundaries.htm. Accessed April 21, 2019.
    2. American Nurses Association. Code of ethics for nurses with interpretive statements. 2nd ed. Silver Spring, MD; 2015.
    3. Remshardt MA. Do you know your professional boundaries? Nursing Made Incredibly Easy! 2015:10(1),5-6. doi:10.1097/01.nme.0000406039.61410.a5.

  • Episode 40: April 17, 2019 - INS 2019 Virtual Conference – Strong Nurses, Strong Practice

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    Strong Nurses, Strong Practice. Listen to a compelling podcast discussion relating the program development and educational offerings for the INS 2019 virtual conference available on May 21, 2019. 

    Strong Nurses, Strong Practice. Listen to a compelling podcast discussion relating the program development and educational offerings for the INS 2019 virtual conference available on May 21, 2019. 

    Marlene Steinheiser, PhD, RN, CRNI®

    Director of Clinical Education, INS

    Marlene serves as lead nurse planner with American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) and works collaboratively with the National Council on Education (NCOE) to plan educational content for all INS conferences. She also establishes the clinical direction, content, and implementation of all educational offerings on the INS LEARNING CENTER, and serves as a clinical liaison with other nursing and health care organizations. Marlene earned her PhD from the University of Arizona with a research focus on compassion fatigue within nursing. Marlene enjoys working out, swimming laps, hiking, and scrapbooking.

    Susan H. Weaver, PhD, RN, CRNI®, NEA-BC

    Nurse Scientist, Hackensack Meridian Health

    Susan Heidenwolf Weaver, PhD, RN, CRNI®, NEA-BC is a nurse scientist at the Ann May Center for Nursing at Hackensack Meridian Health and the New Jersey Collaborating Center for Nursing. She is active with New Jersey State Nurses Association as a b member-at-large and 2017–2018 Team Leader of Healthy Nurse Healthy New Jersey. Sue’s experience as an ICU nurse and nurse educator made her responsibile for teaching the IV courses at her institutions. She is currently a nurse scientist, focusing her research on the nursing workforce. Specifically, she examines the role of the evening and night administrative nurse.

    Host: Dawn Berndt, DNP, RN, CRNI® – INS Infusion Nurse Educator

    Guests: 
    • Marlene Steinheiser, PhD, RN, CRNI® – INS Director of Nursing Education
    • Susan H. Weaver, PhD, RN, CRNI®, NEA-BC – Nurse Scientist  

    Caring for the caregiver is often a discounted aspect of health care. Nurses pour out their compassion, strength, abilities, and expertise on behalf of their patients, yet often, their own personal health and well-being is neglected. This focus track is dedicated to building strong nurses and strong practice. Join our podcast host, Dawn Berndt, and guests Marlene Steinheiser and Susan Weaver to learn about the development of this program and the virtual sessions offered.

    INS 2019 Virtual Sessions:
    • Championing Workplace Civility
    • Compassion Fatigue and Burnout: Understanding the Differences and Managing the Consequences
    • Substance Use Disorder in Nursing
    • It's Time for YOU: The Healthy Infusion Nurse
    • Healthy Nurse, Healthy Nation 

    Resources:
    Link to INS 2019 Virtual Conference May 21, 2019: https://www.learningcenter.ins... 

  • Episode 39: April 3, 2019 - ANTT- an International Standard for Safe Aseptic Technique, Part 3

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Discuss the increase in health literacy and patient involvement related to ANTT®, an International Standard for Safe Aseptic Technique with Stephen Rowley and Simon Clare.

    Discuss the increase in health literacy and patient involvement related to ANTT®, an International Standard for Safe Aseptic Technique with Stephen Rowley and Simon Clare.

    Stephen Rowley, MSc, BSc (Hons), RN, RSCN

    Association for Aseptic Technique (ANTT)

    Stephen Rowley, MSc, BSc (Hons), RN, RSCN, is clinical director for the Association for Safe Aseptic Practice (ASAP) and the originator of the ANTT Clinical Practice Framework. Mr. Rowley leads the ASAP, a not-for-profit, nongovernmental organization with a global purview. Working closely with organizations and governments around the world, he has helped realize improvements in aseptic practice and health care-associated infections. His peer-reviewed publications are widely cited, and as a leading expert on aseptic technique he lectures internationally.

    Simon Clare, MRes, BA, RN

    The Association for Safe Aseptic Practice (ASAP)

    Simon Clare, MRes, BA, RN, is the research and practice development director at The Association for Safe Aseptic Practice. He has been a registered nurse for 28 years and a clinical nurse specialist for 15 years. His background is in haematopoietic stem cell transplantation, and he has worked at the Myeloma Institute at the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences in Little Rock, Arkansas, and at University College London Hospitals. A former visiting lecturer at City, University of London and member of the European Society for Blood and Marrow Transplantation research group, Mr. Clare was a joint winner of the 2008 Nursing Times award for infection control nursing.

    ANTT- an International Standard for Safe Aseptic Technique 
    Part 3

    Guests: 
    • Stephen Rowley, MSc, BSc (Hons), RN, RSCN, Clinical Director of the Association for Safe Aseptic Practice and originator of ANTT®
    • Simon Clare, MRes, BA, RN, Research and Practice Development Director at The Association for Safe Aseptic Practice

    Invasive clinical procedures pose infection risks for patients in all care settings. It is imperative that health care workers employ standardized practice protocols for all invasive procedures. INS podcast guests Stephen Rowley and Simon Clare will discuss the importance of aseptic non-touch technique (ANTT®) and will share their work with the Association for Safe Aseptic Practice.

    Resource: • http://antt.org/ANTT_Site/home...