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  • The Normalization of Deviance in Health Care Delivery: Insights on Prevention, Learning, and Corrective Action From Organizational Science

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered Recorded On: 10/17/2018

    In today’s health care climate, normalized deviation from established standards of practice is the focus of considerable research and practical intervention. It is now widely recognized that medical errors, workarounds, and adverse drug events are often caused by cultural norms and institutionalized patterns of behavior developed over time. Yet despite this recognition, most organizations encounter significant barriers to changing these normative pressures. In this webinar, change management tools and principles from the organizational sciences will be provided to help participants prevent, minimize, and correct the negative consequences of normative deviance.

    In today’s health care climate, normalized deviation from established standards of practice is the focus of considerable research and practical intervention. It is now widely recognized that medical errors, workarounds, and adverse drug events are often caused by cultural norms and institutionalized patterns of behavior developed over time. Yet despite this recognition, most organizations encounter significant barriers to changing these normative pressures. In this webinar, change management tools and principles from the organizational sciences will be provided to help participants prevent, minimize, and correct the negative consequences of normative deviance. 

    Learning Outcomes: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
    • Diagnose problems associated with normative deviance.
    • Gain exposure to contemporary change-management models.
    • Understand basic intervention strategies for overcoming dysfunctional deviance.

    Benjamin Dunford, PhD, MS, BS

    Associate Professor

    Benjamin Dunford, PhD, MS, BS, is an associate professor at the Krannert School of Management of Purdue University. He also has formal academic affiliations with Purdue’s department of psychological sciences and Regenstrief Center for Healthcare Engineering, and with the school of management at Seoul National University in South Korea. Professor Dunford is a recognized teacher at the master’s and executive levels on topics that include negotiation, organizational change, leadership, employee engagement, and conflict management. His research, which has been recognized for excellence, focuses on how management of people has an impact on organizational effectiveness, employee engagement, and safety outcomes, with a special emphasis on the health care industry. The author of more than 25 published peer reviewed journal articles, conference proceedings, and book chapters, Professor Dunford has consulted with numerous firms from a variety of industries, but most extensively in health care. 

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: October 17, 2021

  • Episode 27: October 10, 2018 - Demystifying Gout (Part 3): Complications and Management of Chronic Gout

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Early detection and treatment of gout is significant for reducing the risk of complications. When left untreated, gout can affect other organs and body parts causing irreversible joint damage, joint deformity, loss of mobility or range of motion, bone loss, tophi, kidney stones, chronic kidney disease, or kidney failure. This third and final podcast on demystifying gout will explore options aimed at reducing the incidence of gouty attacks, how to prevent complications, and ways to improve the patient’s quality of life.

    Early detection and treatment of gout is significant for reducing the risk of complications. When left untreated, gout can affect other organs and body parts causing irreversible joint damage, joint deformity, loss of mobility or range of motion, bone loss, tophi, kidney stones, chronic kidney disease, or kidney failure. This third and final podcast on demystifying gout will explore options aimed at reducing the incidence of gouty attacks, how to prevent complications, and ways to improve the patient’s quality of life. 

    Vickie Sayles, BSN, RN-BC, CRNI®

    Clinical Nurse Manager

    Vickie L. Sayles, BSN, RN-BC, CRNI®, is the clinical nurse manager for the department of rheumatic and immunologic diseases at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation in Cleveland, Ohio. She is board-certified in ambulatory nursing, rheumatology nursing, and infusion nursing, and she currently serves as treasurer of the Rheumatology Nurse Society. A presenter at various conferences in the United States, Ms. Sayles has spoken on subjects such as infusion nursing, infusion medications, biologic drugs, and biosimilar drugs.

    Guest:

    Vickie L. Sayles, BSN, RN-BC, CRNI®
    Clinical Nurse Manager, Department of Rheumatic and Immunologic Disease
    Cleveland Clinic Foundation

    Gout is a chronic metabolic disease experienced by approximately 4% of the population of the United States. Gout is caused by the buildup of uric acid crystals in the joints, kidneys, and other body systems, and can be debilitating for patients. Early detection of gout results in significantly fewer complications over time and reduces associated comorbidities. This 3-part case study will discuss the clinical signs and symptoms, identify the triggers associated with attacks, examine various treatment options, and review common complications and prevention.

    Resources:     

    • Borghi C, Perez-Ruiz F. Urate lowering therapies in the treatment of gout: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci. 2016;20(5):983-992.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27010159.  Accessed September 19, 2018. 
    • Dalbeth N, Stamp LK, Merriman TR. The genetics of gout: towards personalized medicine? BMC Med. 2017;15(1):108. doi: 10.1186/s12916-017-0878-5.
    • Shekelle P, Newberry S, Fitzgerald J, et al. Management of gout: a systematic review in support of an American College of Physicians clinical practice guideline. Ann Intern Med. 2017;166(1):37-51. doi: 10.7326/M16-0461. 
    • Wagler V, Pumerantz A. Management of acute and recurrent gout. Ann Intern Med. 2017;166(10):759. doi: 10.7326/L17-0144.

  • Episode 26: September 26, 2018 - Demystifying Gout (Part 2): Diagnosis and Management

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    The overall prevalence of gout in the United States is about 4 percent. Gout is more frequent as individuals age, and men experience the disease more often than women. Comorbidities, such as obesity, high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes, kidney disorders, and hypocholesteremia, can increase the risk of gout. Both heredity and diet may also affect prevalence. Part 2 of this 3-part series will discuss how gout is diagnosed and provide an overview of medications used in its treatment. The podcast will conclude with the second segment discussion the continuing case study.

    The overall prevalence of gout in the United States is about 4 percent. Gout is more frequent as individuals age, and men experience the disease more often than women. Comorbidities, such as obesity, high blood pressure, heart disease, diabetes, kidney disorders, and hypocholesteremia, can increase the risk of gout. Both heredity and diet may also affect prevalence. Part 2 of this 3-part series will discuss how gout is diagnosed and provide an overview of medications used in its treatment. The podcast will conclude with the second segment discussion the continuing case study. 

    Vickie Sayles, BSN, RN-BC, CRNI®

    Clinical Nurse Manager

    Vickie L. Sayles, BSN, RN-BC, CRNI®, is the clinical nurse manager for the department of rheumatic and immunologic diseases at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation in Cleveland, Ohio. She is board-certified in ambulatory nursing, rheumatology nursing, and infusion nursing, and she currently serves as treasurer of the Rheumatology Nurse Society. A presenter at various conferences in the United States, Ms. Sayles has spoken on subjects such as infusion nursing, infusion medications, biologic drugs, and biosimilar drugs.

    Guest:
    Vickie L. Sayles, BSN, RN-BC, CRNI®
    Clinical Nurse Manager, Department of Rheumatic and Immunologic Disease
    Cleveland Clinic Foundation

    Gout is a chronic metabolic disease experienced by approximately 4% of the population of the United States. Gout is caused by the buildup of uric acid crystals in the joints, kidneys, and other body systems, and can be debilitating for patients. Early detection of gout results in significantly fewer complications over time and reduces associated comorbidities. This 3-part case study will discuss the clinical signs and symptoms, identify the triggers associated with attacks, examine various treatment options, and review common complications and prevention.

    Resources:
    1. Borghi C, Perez-Ruiz F. Urate lowering therapies in the treatment of gout:  a systematic review and meta-analysis.  Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci. 2016;20(5):983-992.  
    2. Dalbeth N, Stamp L, Merriman T. The genetics of gout: towards personalized medicine? BMC Med. 2017;15:108.  doi: 10.1186/s12916-017-0878-5.
    3. Shekelle P, Newberry S, Fitzgerald J, et al. Management of gout: a systematic review in support of an American College of Physicians Clinical Practice Guideline. Ann Intern Med. 2017;166(1):37-55.  doi: 10.7326/M16-0461. 
    4. Wagler VD, Pumerantz AW. Management of acute and recurrent gout. Ann Intern Med. 2017;166(10):759.  doi: 10.7326/L17-0144.

  • Demystifying Gout: Pathogenesis and Guidelines for the Management of Gout

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered Recorded On: 09/19/2018

    Gout is a chronic metabolic disease experienced by approximately 4% of the population of the United States. Gout is caused by the buildup of uric acid crystals in the joints, kidneys, and other body systems, and can be debilitating for patients. Early detection of gout results in significantly fewer complications over time and reduces associated comorbidities. This presentation is designed to discuss the clinical signs and symptoms of gout, identify the triggers associated with attacks of gout, examine various treatment options, and review common complications experienced by patients with gout. This session also will explore options aimed at reducing the incidence of attacks of gout, learning how to prevent complications, and understanding ways patients with gout can improve their quality of life.

    Commercial Support: Horizon Pharma

    image

    Gout is a chronic metabolic disease experienced by approximately 4% of the population of the United States. Gout is caused by the buildup of uric acid crystals in the joints, kidneys, and other body systems, and can be debilitating for patients. Early detection of gout results in significantly fewer complications over time and reduces associated comorbidities. This presentation is designed to discuss the clinical signs and symptoms of gout, identify the triggers associated with attacks of gout, examine various treatment options, and review common complications experienced by patients with gout. This session also will explore options aimed at reducing the incidence of attacks of gout, learning how to prevent complications, and understanding ways patients with gout can improve their quality of life.

    Learning Outcomes: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
    • Identify the signs and symptoms of gout.
    • Discuss the triggers and current treatments for gout.
    • Verbalize complications associated with chronic gout.

    Vickie Sayles, BSN, RN-BC, CRNI®

    Clinical Nurse Manager

    Vickie L. Sayles, BSN, RN-BC, CRNI®, is the clinical nurse manager for the department of rheumatic and immunologic diseases at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation in Cleveland, Ohio. She is board-certified in ambulatory nursing, rheumatology nursing, and infusion nursing, and she currently serves as treasurer of the Rheumatology Nurse Society. A presenter at various conferences in the United States, Ms. Sayles has spoken on subjects such as infusion nursing, infusion medications, biologic drugs, and biosimilar drugs.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: September 19, 2021

  • Episode 25: September 12, 2018 - Demystifying Gout (Part 1): Pathophysiology, Population Prevalence, and Dietary Influences

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Gout is a relatively common form of inflammatory arthritis that causes periods of painful swelling in joints. Although it is similar in many ways to rheumatoid arthritis, it is not an autoimmune disease, but rather a metabolic disorder. In this, the first of 3 podcasts on demystifying gout, the pathophysiology of gout, population prevalence, and the role diet plays in gouty arthritis will be discussed, and the first segment in a 3-part case study will be introduced.

    Gout is a relatively common form of inflammatory arthritis that causes periods of painful swelling in joints. Although it is similar in many ways to rheumatoid arthritis, it is not an autoimmune disease, but rather a metabolic disorder. In this, the first of 3 podcasts on demystifying gout, the pathophysiology of gout, population prevalence, and the role diet plays in gouty arthritis will be discussed, and the first segment in a 3-part case study will be introduced.

    Vickie Sayles, BSN, RN-BC, CRNI®

    Clinical Nurse Manager

    Vickie L. Sayles, BSN, RN-BC, CRNI®, is the clinical nurse manager for the department of rheumatic and immunologic diseases at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation in Cleveland, Ohio. She is board-certified in ambulatory nursing, rheumatology nursing, and infusion nursing, and she currently serves as treasurer of the Rheumatology Nurse Society. A presenter at various conferences in the United States, Ms. Sayles has spoken on subjects such as infusion nursing, infusion medications, biologic drugs, and biosimilar drugs.

    Guest:
    Vickie L. Sayles, BSN, RN-BC, CRNI®
    Clinical Nurse Manager, Department of Rheumatic and Immunologic Disease
    Cleveland Clinic Foundation

    Gout is a chronic metabolic disease experienced by approximately 4% of the population of the United States. Gout is caused by the buildup of uric acid crystals in the joints, kidneys, and other body systems, and can be debilitating for patients. Early detection of gout results in significantly fewer complications over time and reduces associated comorbidities. This 3-part case study will discuss the clinical signs and symptoms, identify the triggers associated with attacks, examine various treatment options, and review common complications and prevention.

    Resources:

    • Borghi C, Perez-Ruiz F. Urate lowering therapies in the treatment of gout: a systematic review and meta-analysis.  Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci. 2016;20(5):983-992. Accessed 18, August 2018.
    • Dalbeth N, Stamp LK, Merriman TR. The genetics of gout: towards personalised medicine? BMC Med. 2017;15(1):108.  doi: 10.1186/s12916-017-0878-5.
    • Shekelle PG, Newberry SJ, Fitzgerald JD, et al. Management of gout:  a systematic review in support of an American College of Physicians Clinical Practice Guideline.  Ann Intern Med. 2017;166(1):37-51.  doi: 10.7326/M16-0461.
    • Wagler V, Pumerantz A. Management of acute and recurrent gout. Ann Intern Med. 2017;166(10):759.  doi: 10.7326/L17-0144.
  • Episode 24: August 29, 2018 - What I Wish You Knew About Me: Nursing the Older Adult, Part 2

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    According to the Pew Research Center, 10,000 baby boomers reach the age of 65 every day. It is predicted that by 2060, the number of those 85 years of age and older will more than triple. To meet the needs of this burgeoning population, it is essential that nurses be knowledgeable about best practices for geriatric patients. Some important aspects of best practices include how aging changes can increase the risk for dehydration and how changes to the integumentary and nervous systems can affect treatments and patient outcomes.

    According to the Pew Research Center, 10,000 baby boomers reach the age of 65 every day. It is predicted that by 2060, the number of those 85 years of age and older will more than triple. To meet the needs of this burgeoning population, it is essential that nurses be knowledgeable about best practices for geriatric patients. Some important aspects of best practices include how aging changes can increase the risk for dehydration and how changes to the integumentary and nervous systems can affect treatments and patient outcomes. 

    Suzanne Purvis, DNP, RN, GCNS-BC

    Clinical Nurse Specialist, Geriatrics

    Suzanne Purvis, DNP, RN, GCNS-BC, has been a geriatric clinical nurse specialist for 20 years. She obtained an MSN and a graduate certificate in gerontology from Georgia State University, and a doctor of nursing practice at the University of Minnesota. Her published work has focused on geriatric nursing competency development, the use of electronic health records in geriatrics, and dementia care education. 

    Guest: 
    Suzanne Purvis, DNP, RN, GCNS-BC
    Clinical Nurse Specialist, Geriatrics
    Beaumont Health
    Royal Oak, Michigan


    According to the Pew Research Center, 10,000 baby boomers reach the age of 65 every day. It is predicted that by 2060, the number of those 85 years of age and older will more than triple. To meet the needs of this burgeoning population, it is essential that nurses be knowledgeable about best practices for geriatric patients. Some important aspects of best practices include how aging changes can increase the risk for dehydration and how changes to the integumentary and nervous systems can affect treatments and patient outcomes. 

    Resources:
    1. Purvis S. Improving cognitive and functional outcomes in hospitalized older adults with dementia. National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists (NACNS) 2016-2017 webinar series. November 8, 2016.
    2. Purvis S, Zupanc T. Improving assessment of pain in the cognitively impaired older adult using a pre- post-quality improvement design. Nurses Improving Care of Health System Elders 2016 Online Connect webinars. October 19, 2016.  
    3. Purvis S, Zupanc T, VanDenBergh S, Martin H. Population-based nursing competency development. J Nurs Professional Dev. 2015;31(4): 231-236.

  • Unleashing the Immune System: Treatment and Adverse Event Management for the Immuno-Oncology Patient

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered Recorded On: 08/22/2018

    This presentation will discuss the clinical indications, administration, and adverse-event implications of novel immuno-oncology agents. As these therapies have emerged, it is evident that the side-effect profile and management of these agents are vastly different from traditional chemotherapy. Immuno-oncology-specific education for health care workers and patients is critical to the safe delivery and implementation of high-quality care. Throughout this presentation, the background of employing the immune system to fight cancer, and using real-patient scenarios to demonstrate best practices for infusion clinicians in the care, quality, and education of the immuno-oncology patient will be explored.

    This presentation will discuss the clinical indications, administration, and adverse-event implications of novel immuno-oncology agents. As these therapies have emerged, it is evident that the side-effect profile and management of these agents are vastly different from traditional chemotherapy. Immuno-oncology-specific education for health care workers and patients is critical to the safe delivery and implementation of high-quality care. Throughout this presentation, the background of employing the immune system to fight cancer, and using real-patient scenarios to demonstrate best practices for infusion clinicians in the care, quality, and education of the immuno-oncology patient will be explored.

    Learning Outcomes: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Identify 3 signs and symptoms of an immune-mediated adverse event.
    • Discuss the importance of early identification and treatment of adverse events.
    • Verbalize 3 different methods of education for immuno-oncology patients.

    ​Megan Derr, MSN, RN, CMSRN, AONCS®

    Megan Derr, MSN, RN, CMSRN, AONCS®, is an oncology quality and evidence-based practice specialist at the Lehigh Valley Cancer Institute in Allentown, Pennsylvania. She is certified by the Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation as an advanced oncology clinical nurse specialist. A highlight in her current role has been educating the cancer institute about immuno-oncology agents, their side effects, and adverse event management. 

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: August 22, 2021

  • Episode 23: August 15, 2018 - What I Wish You Knew About Me: Nursing the Older Adult, Part 1

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Did you know older adults have more exacerbations of chronic conditions when receiving infusion therapy than younger adults? For instance, a simple antibiotic infusion in an older adult may initiate an arthritic flare. Older adults often are unable to distinguish between an acute medication reaction, symptoms of their chronic disease, or conditional effects of aging. Are you prepared to communicate and advocate for your older patients?

    Did you know older adults have more exacerbations of chronic conditions when receiving infusion therapy than younger adults? For instance, a simple antibiotic infusion in an older adult may initiate an arthritic flare. Older adults often are unable to distinguish between an acute medication reaction, symptoms of their chronic disease, or conditional effects of aging. Are you prepared to communicate and advocate for your older patients?   

    Suzanne Purvis, DNP, RN, GCNS-BC

    Clinical Nurse Specialist, Geriatrics

    Suzanne Purvis, DNP, RN, GCNS-BC, has been a geriatric clinical nurse specialist for 20 years. She obtained an MSN and a graduate certificate in gerontology from Georgia State University, and a doctor of nursing practice at the University of Minnesota. Her published work has focused on geriatric nursing competency development, the use of electronic health records in geriatrics, and dementia care education. 

    Guest: 
    Suzanne Purvis, DNP, RN, GCNS-BC
    Clinical Nurse Specialist, Geriatrics
    Beaumont Health

    Did you know older adults have more exacerbations of chronic conditions when receiving infusion therapy than younger adults? For instance, a simple antibiotic infusion in an older adult may initiate an arthritic flare. Older adults often are unable to distinguish between an acute medication reaction, symptoms of their chronic disease, or conditional effects of aging. Are you prepared to communicate and advocate for your older patients?   


    Resources:
    1. Purvis S. Improving cognitive and functional outcomes in hospitalized older adults with dementia. National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists (NACNS) 2016-2017 webinar series. November 8, 2016.

    2. Purvis S, Zupanc T. Improving assessment of pain in the cognitively impaired older adult using a pre- post-quality improvement design. Nurses Improving Care of Health System Elders 2016 Online Connect webinars. October 19, 2016.  

    3. Purvis S, Zupanc T, VanDenBergh S, Martin H. Population-based nursing competency development. J Nurs Professional Dev. 2015;31(4): 231-236.

  • Hazardous Infusion Drug Administration in the Home Setting

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered Recorded On: 07/25/2018

    Hazardous drug (HD) agents traditionally have been administered in controlled, health care settings. However, the introduction of intravenous (IV) HDs for home administration has become an area of growing concern for home care agencies and home infusion nurses. The United States Pharmacopeia (USP) has regulated the admixture and handling of HDs for controlled settings, and its role is now expanding to include all areas in the trajectory of care. Home infusion is one aspect of care that will require nursing education, policies and procedures, and appropriate personal protective equipment. Successful implementation of USP regulations will require home health infusion teams to develop a hazardous drug administration and exposure management plan to protect infusion nurses, patients and families, and the environment from toxic residue exposure.

    Hazardous drug (HD) agents traditionally have been administered in controlled, health care settings. However, the introduction of intravenous (IV) HDs for home administration has become an area of growing concern for home care agencies and home infusion nurses. The United States Pharmacopeia (USP) has regulated the admixture and handling of HDs for controlled settings, and its role is now expanding to include all areas in the trajectory of care. Home infusion is one aspect of care that will require nursing education, policies and procedures, and appropriate personal protective equipment. Successful implementation of USP <800> regulations will require home health infusion teams to develop a hazardous drug administration and exposure management plan to protect infusion nurses, patients and families, and the environment from toxic residue exposure. 

    Learning Outcomes: At the conclusion of this session, learners will be able to: 
    • Discuss the impact USP <800> will have on home infusion nurses.
    • Recognize the risks to nurses, patients and families, and the environment associated with intravenous (IV) drug residue exposure.
    • Identify necessary safety precautions when administering IV chemotherapy and other HDs in the home.
    • Review specific patient and family education that may prevent and/or reduce the risk of HD exposure in the home.

    Cynthia Huff, MSN, RN, CRNI®, OCN®, CNL

    Home Infusion Coordinator

    Cynthia Huff, MSN, RN, CRNI®, OCN®, CNL, is a home infusion coordinator at Sutter Infusion & Pharmacy Services in Sacramento, California. Her experience as an infusion and oncology nurse spans more than 20 years. Ms. Huff’s current nursing focus is to protect health care workers, patients and families, and the environment from exposure to hazardous drug residue as the administration of oral and intravenous chemotherapy increasingly takes place in patients’ homes. Ms. Huff earned a master’s degree in nursing from the University of San Francisco (USF) and recently obtained certification as a clinical nurse leader (CNL). She is currently enrolled in USF’s doctor of nursing practice degree program, with a focus on population health leadership. Her goal is to teach nursing practice.  

    Rosangel Klein, MS, RN, CNS, OCN®

    Oncology Clinical Nurse Specialist

    Rosangel Klein, MS, RN, CNS, OCN®, is the oncology clinical nurse specialist at Sutter Roseville Medical Center. She has held a number of leadership positions at Sutter Health. Most recently, she was Sutter Health Valley Area’s interim oncology service line executive and oncology service line clinical director. As service line clinical director, she was responsible for clinical integration across the continuum of care. Before this role, she served as the regional infusion center manager for Sutter Roseville Medical Center, where she worked for 4 years and was instrumental in the growth of the infusion center. She assisted in opening a new comprehensive cancer center in 2016. Ms. Klein earned a bachelor’s degree in nursing from the University of San Francisco and completed a master’s degree in oncology nursing at the University of California San Francisco.   

    Surani Kwan, MBA, MSN, NP-BC, FACHE, FAAN

    Director for Professional Practice and Nursing Excellence

    Surani Kwan, MBA, MSN, NP-BC, FACHE, FAAN, is director for professional practice and nursing excellence for Sutter Health, where she is responsible for advancing professional practice throughout system affiliates, and providing leadership in professional development, clinical education, and training for nursing and advanced practice clinicians. She was previously the executive director of operations for the Sutter Pacific Medical Foundation. Kwan has been a member of the California Association for Nurse Practitioners for nearly 20 years and served as the association’s president for 2 terms. Currently pursuing a doctorate in nursing practice at Samuel Merritt University in Oakland, California, Kwan holds a master’s of science degree in nursing and a master’s degree in business administration. She is also a certified family nurse practitioner and a Fellow of the American Association for Nurse Practitioners and the American College of Healthcare Executives.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: July 25, 2021

  • Intravenous Immunoglobulin Therapy: Treatment Approaches, Product Selection, and Administration Considerations

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered Recorded On: 06/13/2018

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy is a life-saving treatment for patients with primary immune deficiency diseases. More than 75% of IVIg therapy administered in the United States is for patients with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. However, indications for use continue to increase. In this session, we will discuss the mechanism of action of immunoglobulins, the use of IVIg therapy in certain disease states, and dosing strategies. Current standardization of product selection, approaches to dosing, and administration, which have had a positive impact on patient safety, will also be considered.

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy is a life-saving treatment for patients with primary immune deficiency diseases. More than 75% of IVIg therapy administered in the United States is for patients with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. However, indications for use continue to increase.  In this session, we will discuss the mechanism of action of immunoglobulins, the use of IVIg therapy in certain disease states, and dosing strategies. Current standardization of product selection, approaches to dosing, and administration, which have had a positive impact on patient safety, will also be considered.  

    Learning Outcomes:  At the conclusion of this presentation, learners will be able to:

    • Verbalize 3 diagnoses for which intravenous immunoglobulin therapy is used.
    • Discuss the mechanism of action of immunoglobulins.
    • Describe approaches to dosing and administration.


    Amy Clarke, RN, IgCN

    Director of Nursing Clinical Program Services

    Amy Clarke, RN, IgCN, is the director of nursing clinical program services for Diplomat Specialty Infusion Group. Involved in specialty and home infusion services since 1994, she has performed more than 2,000 intravenous and subcutaneous infusions. Ms. Clarke has delivered numerous presentations on immunoglobulin administration, including continuing education sessions for the National Home Infusion Association and the Immunoglobulin Nursing Society (IgNS). She is the immediate past president of IgNS. 

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: June 13, 2021