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  • Short Peripheral Catheter Infiltration: Minimizing Risks to Improve Outcomes

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 02/13/2019

    Hospitalized patients receiving medications or fluids via short peripheral catheters (SPCs) are at risk for infiltration. Infiltration can increase patient length of stay, result in repeated vascular access procedures, increase costs by use of supplies and nursing time, lead to short-term and long-term patient harm, and decrease patient satisfaction. Early detection of infiltration can minimize risks by prompt intervention. Quality improvement projects have been directed toward staff education on SPC insertion, maintenance, assessment, and monitoring. This webinar will discuss current research and practice initiatives, as well as the benefits of emerging technology aimed at reducing infiltration.

    Commercial Support: ivWatch

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    Hospitalized patients receiving medications or fluids via short peripheral catheters (SPCs) are at risk for infiltration. Infiltration can increase patient length of stay, result in repeated vascular access procedures, increase costs by use of supplies and nursing time, lead to short-term and long-term patient harm, and decrease patient satisfaction. Early detection of infiltration can minimize risks by prompt intervention. Quality improvement projects have been directed toward staff education on SPC insertion, maintenance, assessment, and monitoring. This webinar will discuss current research and practice initiatives, as well as the benefits of emerging technology aimed at reducing infiltration.

    Learning Outcomes:
    At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
    1. Identify risk factors associated with SPC infiltration
    2. Describe the benefits of early and ongoing assessment to detect infiltration 

    Gregory Schears, MD

    Mayo Clinic

    Gregory J. Schears, MD, is a pediatric intensivist and anesthesiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. He has had a long-standing interest in reducing patient complications and improving the approach to vascular access. He is a consultant to the department of anesthesiology and the division of pediatric critical care medicine, the physician liaison to the nurse-led peripherally inserted central catheter team, and is also the comedical director of the cardiovascular pediatric surgical intensive care unit. An associate  professor of anesthesiology, Dr. Schears has presented locally, regionally, nationally, and internationally.

    Disclosure: ivWatch; Consultant Fee; COI resolved

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: February 13, 2022

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • Episode 35: February 6, 2019 - Infiltration: Not What We Thought It Was

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Short peripheral catheter (SPC) infiltration: Using technology as another tool to improve patient outcomes.

    Short peripheral catheter (SPC) infiltration: Using technology as another tool to improve patient outcomes.
    Commercial Support: ivWatch

    image


    Mary Alexander, MA, RN, CRNI®, CAE, FAAN

    Chief Executive Officer, INS

    Mary Alexander, MA, RN, CRNI®, CAE, FAAN, has served as CEO of the Infusion Nurses Society (INS) and Infusion Nurses Certification Corporation since 1997. She is also editor-in-chief of the Journal of Infusion Nursing, the Core Curriculum for Infusion Nursing, and INS’ textbook, Infusion Nursing: An Evidence-Based Approach. In addition, Mary represented INS on the panel that revised the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Guidelines for the Prevention of Intravascular Catheter-Related Infections in 2011. She speaks globally on topics such as the benefits of the specialty practice of infusion nursing, the development of standards of practice, and improving patient safety.

    Gary Warren

    President and CEO, ivWatch

    Gary Warren serves as president and CEO of ivWatch, the only provider of noninvasive continuous monitoring devices for the early detection of peripheral intrvaneous infiltrations and extravastions. In his role, Gary oversees all aspects of operations and strategic direction for the company. He has more than 30 years’ experience with product management and delivery within a range of environments, from small startups to large public companies and government programs. Gary holds a bachelor of science in aeronautical engineering from Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and a master of science from Mississippi State University in aerospace engineering/computational fluid dynamics. 

    About ivWatch: 
    ivWatch, LLC is the leading medical device manufacturer and biosensor technology company focused on improving patient safety and the effectiveness of intravenous therapy. Our dedicated and passionate team is focused on our company vision of eliminating patient harm caused by infiltrations and extravasations. Through our innovative monitored IV solutions, we help minimize the risks associated with adverse IV events. Follow us on Twitter @ivWatch or Facebook @ivWatchLLC. www.ivwatch.com

    Guests:
    Mary Alexander, MA, RN, CRNI®, CAE, FAAN
    Gary Warren, President and CEO of ivWatch 

    Even when the most diligent bedside nurse is following SPC assessment protocols, infiltration or extravasation may still occur. This podcast will discuss the various causes of infiltration, and how these events are often based on patient factors such as age, vessel health, and infusate characteristics rather than the result of improper SPC placement. To ensure optimal patient care, infusion nurses and industry partners must continually review available evidence and technological advancements to ensure a given standard or technology supports the best care possible to the patient. Working as a team with clinicians, first-to-market device company ivWatch will share lessons learned about education and improving patient outcomes related to peripheral IV infiltration and extravasation.

    Resources:
    www.ivwatch.com
    www.ivwatch.com/whitepaperform

  • Episode 34: January 23, 2019 - Psychiatric Nursing: Caring for the Whole Person

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Are you concerned about meeting the needs of patients with mental health conditions? Join Dr. Renee Bauer for this podcast to learn about the importance of listening, communicating, and practicing professional presence.

    Are you concerned about meeting the needs of patients with mental health conditions? Join Dr. Renee Bauer for this podcast to learn about the importance of listening, communicating, and practicing professional presence.

    Renee Bauer, PhD, MS, RN

    Indiana State University

    Renee Bauer, PhD, MS, RN, is an associate professor at Indiana State University. Dr. Bauer teaches classes that encompass assessment to medical-surgical nursing and has been the director of second degree students for the past 8 years. She has more than 25 years of experience as a nurse (primarily in a psychiatric setting), and her work has been published by more than 25 publications. She is an officer of Sigma Theta Tau honor society, and a member of other organizations such as the National League of Nursing and the Indiana State Board of Nursing. She is currently pursuing a certificate to become a psychiatric nurse practitioner.

    Disclosure: There is no conflict of interest for anyone with the ability to control content of the activity. No conflict of interest to report

    Guest:
    Renee Bauer, PhD, MS, RN
    Associate Professor, Indiana State University

    Infusion nurses manage care for patients of all ages and in all care settings. Many have multiple therapeutic needs, including mental health care. A holistic nursing approach is important when managing care for patients with mental health conditions. Listening attentively, asking open-ended questions, practicing presence of self, and developing therapeutic relationships are essential elements of providing nursing care. Listen in as Dr. Renee Bauer discusses her passion for psychiatric nursing and communication methods that will strengthen your nursing skills.

    Resource:
    1. National Alliance on Mental Illness. Mental illness awareness week. https://www.nami.org/Get-Involved/Awareness-Events/Mental-Illness-Awareness-Week. Accessed January 7, 2019. 

  • Bleeding Disorders: Management of Pediatric Patients

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 01/16/2019

    Bleeding disorders are rare and complex, and to some nurses, frightening. The information in this presentation is designed to introduce and discuss the management of pediatric patients with a bleeding disorder. Infusion nurses are key to high-quality care in the home setting. Therefore, bleeding disorder-specific education is critical in the implementation and delivery of excellent nursing care. During this presentation, participants will explore the classifications of bleeding disorders, review laboratory tests necessary for diagnosing a bleeding disorder, and discuss current and emerging treatment options, as well as complications associated with bleeding disorders.

    Bleeding disorders are rare and complex, and to some nurses, frightening. The information in this presentation is designed to introduce and discuss the management of pediatric patients with a bleeding disorder. Infusion nurses are key to high-quality care in the home setting. Therefore, bleeding disorder-specific education is critical in the implementation and delivery of excellent nursing care. During this presentation, participants will explore the classifications of bleeding disorders, review laboratory tests necessary for diagnosing a bleeding disorder, and discuss current and emerging treatment options, as well as complications associated with bleeding disorders. 

    Learning Outcomes: 
    At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
    • Describe the classifications of hemophilia A, hemophilia B, and von Willebrand disease (VWD).
    • Recall the types of screening for hemophilia A, B, and vWD.
    • Discuss the treatment for hemophilia A, hemophilia B, and vWD.
    • Recognize signs and symptoms of complications in pediatric patients with a bleeding disorder.

    Ashley Smith, MSN, RN, CRNI®

    Nurse Specialist, Bleeding Disorders

    Ashley Smith, MSN, RN, CRNI®, is a nurse specialist in bleeding disorder therapies at Paragon Healthcare Specialty. Before her career in specialty pharmacy, Mrs. Smith spent many years caring for pediatric and adult patients in the emergency department. She has also worked in cardiology, general medicine, and outpatient surgery. She earned a bachelor’s degree from Jacksonville State University and an MSN in nursing education from the University of North Alabama. She is a member of the Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing, now known as Sigma. 

    Disclosure: This educational activity does not promote this entity or the products thereof. There is no conflict of interest for anyone with the ability to control content for this activity except Ashley Smith, MSN, RN, CRNI® is employed by Paragon Healthcare, Inc., a specialty pharmacy that services hemophilia patients. Conflict of interest resolved.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: January 16, 2022

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • Episode 33: January 9, 2019 - Inside INS: What’s New in 2019

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Listen in as INS leaders talk about what’s new at INS in 2019!

    Listen in as INS leaders talk about what’s new at INS in 2019! 

    Chris Hunt, MBA

    Executive Vice President, INS

    As INS’ executive vice president, Chris Hunt, MBA, works with the executive team to develop strategies for new business development and organizational growth. Chris began his career at INS in 1995 and has held the positions of meetings manager, director of meetings, and director of marketing, before assuming his current position as executive vice president. 

    Maria Connors, MBA

    Director of Operations and Member Services, INS

    Maria Connors, MBA, manages daily operations for INS and INCC, and oversees INS’ Member Services and Marketing departments. In addition to ensuring your membership experience with INS is a positive one, she also collaborates with the executive team to develop strategies for new business and organizational growth.

    Meghan Trupiano, MBA, CMP

    Meetings Manager, INS

    As INS’ meetings manager, Meghan Trupiano, MBA, manages all activities related to INS’ national meetings. She is responsible for exhibit space sales, advertising, and sponsorship sales, as well as attendee marketing.

    Marlene Steinheiser, PhD, RN, CRNI®

    Director of Clinical Education, INS

    Marlene serves as lead nurse planner with American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) and works collaboratively with the National Council on Education (NCOE) to plan educational content for all INS conferences. She also establishes the clinical direction, content, and implementation of all educational offerings on the INS LEARNING CENTER, and serves as a clinical liaison with other nursing and health care organizations. Marlene earned her PhD from the University of Arizona with a research focus on compassion fatigue within nursing. Marlene enjoys working out, swimming laps, hiking, and scrapbooking.

    Guests: 

    • Chris Hunt, MBA, Executive Vice President, INS
    • Maria Connors, MBA, Director of Operations and Member Services, INS
    • Meghan Trupiano, MBA, CMP, Meetings Manager, INS
    • Marlene Steinheiser, PhD, RN, CRNI®, Director of Nursing Education, INS

    Would you like to learn more about how you can validate your nursing competencies in infusion practice? What’s a “solution room”? Are you interested in speaking at an upcoming educational seminar at INS? Or are you thinking about attending INS’ national conference—INS 2019—in Baltimore in May?  Listen in as INS leaders discuss all of these topics and more and discover what’s new in 2019.

    Resource:
    1. www.ins1.org 

  • Episode 32: December 19, 2018 - INS Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice Revision

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    INS’ most recognized publication, the Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice (the Standards) has long provided the framework that guides clinical practice. The Standards are used to define and develop organizational infusion-based policies and procedures for all practice settings. The revision process for the next edition of the Standards is now underway. The revision team is comprised of infusion experts who practice internationally and nationally, representing all care settings and patient care populations. Join INS CEO Mary Alexander, Lisa Gorski, and Mary Hagle as they discuss the revision process and learn when you may expect the next version.

    INS’ most recognized publication, the Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice (the Standards) has long provided the framework that guides clinical practice. The Standards are used to define and develop organizational infusion-based policies and procedures for all practice settings. The revision process for the next edition of the Standards is now underway. The revision team is comprised of infusion experts who practice internationally and nationally, representing all care settings and patient care populations. Join INS CEO Mary Alexander, Lisa Gorski, and Mary Hagle as they discuss the revision process and learn when you may expect the next version.  

    Mary Alexander, MA, RN, CRNI®, CAE, FAAN

    Chief Executive Officer, INS

    Mary Alexander, MA, RN, CRNI®, CAE, FAAN, has served as CEO of the Infusion Nurses Society (INS) and Infusion Nurses Certification Corporation since 1997. She is also editor-in-chief of the Journal of Infusion Nursing, the Core Curriculum for Infusion Nursing, and INS’ textbook, Infusion Nursing: An Evidence-Based Approach. In addition, Mary represented INS on the panel that revised the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Guidelines for the Prevention of Intravascular Catheter-Related Infections in 2011. She speaks globally on topics such as the benefits of the specialty practice of infusion nursing, the development of standards of practice, and improving patient safety.

    Lisa A. Gorski, RN, MS, HHCNS,BC, CRNI®, FAAN

    Clinical nurse specialist

    Lisa Gorski, MS, RN, HHCNS-BC, CRNI® has more than 30 years of professional experience in the fields of home care and home infusion therapy. She is currently the chairperson for the INS Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice 2021 revision committee and served as INS president from 2007-2008. She is the author of numerous journal articles and several books including Fast Facts for Nurses About Home Infusion Therapy. Lisa speaks globally on a variety of infusion therapy-related topics. 

    Mary Hagle, PhD, RN-BC, FAAN

    Nurse Scientist

    Mary Hagle, PhD, RN-BC, FAAN, has more than 30 years of clinical experience and works a consultant for evidence-based practice, clinically focused research, and infusion therapy. She has primarily practiced as an oncology clinical nurse specialist and researcher in a variety of settings in the midwestern United States. Mary is currently is a research scientist at the Milwaukee VA medical center where she facilitates and conducts research, translates best evidence into practice, and supervises patient safety and post-doctoral fellows. Mary is a co-author of the Infusion Nurses Society’s Standards of Practice for Infusion Therapy, 2011 and 2016 editions. She is also an author of several book chapters on evidence-based practice and infusion therapy, as well as editor of the latest edition of Plumer’s Principles and Practice of Infusion Therapy.  

      

    Guests:

    • Mary Alexander, MA, RN, CRNI®, CAE, FAAN
    • Lisa Gorski, MS, RN, HHCNS-BC, CRNI®
    • Mary Hagle, PhD, RN-BC, FAAN


    INS’ most recognized publication, the Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice (the Standards) has long provided the framework that guides clinical practice. The Standards are used to define and develop organizational infusion-based policies and procedures for all practice settings. The revision process for the next edition of the Standards is now underway. The revision team is comprised of infusion experts who practice internationally and nationally, representing all care settings and patient care populations. Join INS CEO Mary Alexander, Lisa Gorski, and Mary Hagle as they discuss the revision process and learn when you may expect the next version.  

    Resources:

    1. Journal of Infusion Nursing: Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice is available at the INS Store:  https://www.ins1.org/Store 
    2. For the eBook version of the Journal of Infusion Nursing: Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice, visit the INS Digital Library.
    3. Gorski L, Hadaway L, Hagle ME, McGoldrick M, Orr M, Doellman D. Infusion therapy standards of practice. J Infus Nurs. 2016;39(suppl 1):S1-S159.

  • Infusion Therapy in Alternative Care Settings

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 12/12/2018

    Administering infusion therapy in alternative care settings requires expert planning and management. Infusion nurses must be knowledgeable when providing care for patients in home, hospice, and other non-acute facilities. This webinar will address best practices for attaining and maintaining vascular access, administration of infusion therapy, and safety and infection control in alternative care settings.

    Administering infusion therapy in alternative care settings requires expert planning and management. Infusion nurses must be knowledgeable when providing care for patients in home, hospice, and other non-acute facilities. This webinar will address best practices for attaining and maintaining vascular access, administration of infusion therapy, and safety and infection control in alternative care settings. 

    Learning Outcomes:
    At the conclusion of this webinar, attendees will:
    a) be able to describe best practices for attaining and maintaining vascular access in alternate care settings and 
    b) identify safety and infection control practices for alternative care settings. 

    Jan Elliott, BS, RN, CRNI®, VA-BC

    Infusion Therapy and Vascular Access Specialist

    Jan Elliott, BS, RN, CRNI®, VA-BC, is an infusion therapy and vascular access specialist, and the primary hospice and palliative care on-call nurse for Upstate Homecare in Central New York. Throughout her 24-year career, Jan has administered infusion therapy, developed vascular access teams, and provided education for clinicians on pain management in the home, alternative, and acute care settings. She has also worked for various US medical device companies as a clinical specialist, preceptor, and educator. In those roles, Jan helped implement conversions on new technologies, products, and services with a focus on promoting and ensuring safer, effective, and efficient delivery of patient care. Jan has been president of the Association of Vascular Access of Central New York for the past 10 years, and has hosted a teaching day symposium for all health care disciplines with discussions on best practices, innovations, and evidence-based medicine. 

    Disclosure:There is no conflict of interest for anyone with the ability to control content for this activity except Jan Elliott who is a clinical nurse educator for Genentech. Conflict resolved.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: December 12, 2021

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • Episode 31: December 5, 2018 - Improving Health - Making an Impact Through Service on Boards

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Have you ever thought about improving the health of people by extending and sharing your nursing knowledge and expertise through service on boards? Imagine the impact you could have serving on a nonprofit or a corporate board. INS is helping place nurses on nonprofit, corporate, and government boards, panels, and commissions through the Nurses on Boards Coalition (NOBC). NOBC’s mission is to improve the health of communities and the nation through the service of nurses on boards. Key strategies are to ensure that at least 10,000 nurses are members of boards by 2020 and to raise awareness that all boards would benefit from the unique perspectives of nurses. These strategies combined aim to improve patient outcomes as well as achieve efficient and effective health care systems at the local, state, and national levels.

    Have you ever thought about improving the health of people by extending and sharing your nursing knowledge and expertise through service on boards? Imagine the impact you could have serving on a nonprofit or a corporate board. INS is helping place nurses on nonprofit, corporate, and government boards, panels, and commissions through the Nurses on Boards Coalition (NOBC).

    NOBC’s mission is to improve the health of communities and the nation through the service of nurses on boards. Key strategies are to ensure that at least 10,000 nurses are members of boards by 2020 and to raise awareness that all boards would benefit from the unique perspectives of nurses. These strategies combined aim to improve patient outcomes as well as achieve efficient and effective health care systems at the local, state, and national levels.

    Laurie Benson, BSN

    Executive Director of the Nurses on Boards Coalition

    Laurie Benson, BSN, is the executive director of the Nurses on Boards Coalition, whose mission is to improve health care in communities across the nation by advancing at least 10,000 nurses to serve on nonprofit, corporate, and government boards by 2020.  She is also a successful co-founder and former CEO of an $80 million technology firm. Laurie has served on 8 corporate boards in the technology, finance, insurance, engineering, manufacturing, and services industries. Additionally, she has expertise and active engagement in health care. 

    Kimberly Harper, MS, RN, FAAN

    CEO, Indiana Center for Nursing

    With nearly 40 years of health care experience, Kimberly Harper, MS, RN, FAAN is chief executive officer of the Indiana Center for Nursing, an organization that unites state-wide nursing education and practice leaders to effect change in the Indiana nursing workforce. In her CEO role she also serves as the nursing co-lead for the Indiana Action Coalition, which serves to implement the recommendations of the Institute of Medicine’s Future of Nursing Report. In addition, Kimberly serves as chair of the board of directors of the national Nurses on Boards Coalition, which unites national nursing organizations toward the goal of improving the health care through the service nurses on nonprofit or corporate, boards. Kimberly demonstrates a strong commitment to bringing voice to the profession of nursing and to preparing tomorrow’s health care professionals.

    Guests: 

    • Laurie Benson, BSN - Executive Director, Nurses on Boards Coalition
    • Kimberly Harper, MS, RN, FAAN - CEO, Indiana Center for Nursing, Lead, Indiana Action Coalition Board Chair, Nurses on Boards Coalition

    Abstract:
    Have you ever thought about improving the health of people by extending and sharing your nursing knowledge and expertise through service on boards? Imagine the impact you could have serving on a nonprofit or a corporate board. INS is helping place nurses on nonprofit, corporate, and government boards, panels, and commissions through the Nurses on Boards Coalition (NOBC).

    NOBC’s mission is to improve the health of communities and the nation through the service of nurses on boards. Key strategies are to ensure that at least 10,000 nurses are members of boards by 2020 and to raise awareness that all boards would benefit from the unique perspectives of nurses. These strategies combined aim to improve patient outcomes as well as achieve efficient and effective health care systems at the local, state, and national levels.

    Resources:

    1. Nurses on Boards Coalition at: https://www.nursesonboardscoal... 
    2. Making an Impact Through Service on Boards. INSider July/August 2018, Volume 1. Issue 4.
    3. https://insprod.personifycloud...
  • Episode 30: November 21, 2018 - The Nurse’s Impact on the Management of Influenza

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Influenza, often referred to as the flu, is a virus that affects the respiratory tract. In the United States, the flu season has begun and it will end in the spring. Easily transmitted by droplet and airborne routes, the flu has an abrupt onset and may induce various complications, especially in high-risk populations. There are several ways to reduce the risk of becoming infected with the flu, including handwashing and having a flu shot. Nurses can have a significant impact on the management of influenza, and they are instrumental in educating patients and colleagues about the ways in which they can reduce their risk.

    Influenza, often referred to as the flu, is a virus that affects the respiratory tract. In the United States, the flu season has begun and it will end in the spring. Easily transmitted by droplet and airborne routes, the flu has an abrupt onset and may induce various complications, especially in high-risk populations. There are several ways to reduce the risk of becoming infected with the flu, including handwashing and having a flu shot. Nurses can have a significant impact on the management of influenza, and they are instrumental in educating patients and colleagues about the ways in which they can reduce their risk.

    Emily Cannon, DNP, MS, BS, RN

    Indiana State University

    Emily Cannon, DNP, MS, BS, RN, is an instructor in the baccalaureate nursing program at Indiana State University since 2012, where she teaches medical-surgical nursing. From 2003 to 2012, she was a member of the nursing faculty at Ivy Technical Community College. Prior to that role, she was a medical-surgical float nurse and an infection control practitioner at Union Hospital in Terre Haute, Indiana. Emily earned an associate of science degree in nursing from Vincennes University in 1995 and went on to complete a bachelor of science degree and a master’s degree in nursing from Indiana Wesleyan University. In May 2015, she completed a doctoral program in nursing practice at Indiana State University.

    Disclosure: There is no conflict of interest for anyone with the ability to control content of the activity. No conflict of interest to report

    Guest: 
    Emily Cannon, DNP, MS, BS, RN 

    Abstract:
    Influenza, often referred to as the flu, is a virus that affects the respiratory tract. In the United States, the flu season has begun and it will end in the spring. Easily transmitted by droplet and airborne routes, the flu has an abrupt onset and may induce various complications, especially in high-risk populations. There are several ways to reduce the risk of becoming infected with the flu, including handwashing and having a flu shot. Nurses can have a significant impact on the management of influenza, and they are instrumental in educating patients and colleagues about the ways in which they can reduce their risk.

    Resources:
    1. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Diagnosing flu.  https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/qa/testing.htm. Updated February 23, 2018. Accessed October 29, 2018.
    2. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. How flu spreads. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/spread.htm.  Updated August 27, 2018. Accessed October 29, 2018.  
    3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. People at high risk of developing serious flu-related complications. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/high_risk.htm. Updated August 27, 2018. Accessed October 29, 2018. 
    4. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Estimating seasonal influenza-associated deaths in the United States. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/about/disease/us_flu-related_deaths.htm. Updated January 29, 2018. Accessed October 29, 2018, 
    5. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Preventive steps. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/consumer/prevention.htm. Updated September 10, 2018. Accessed October 29, 2018. 
    6. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Situation update: summary of weekly fluview report. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/weekly/summary.htm. Updated October 26, 2018. Accessed October 29, 2018. 
    7. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Transcript for CDC update on flu activity. https://www.cdc.gov/media/releases/2018/t0126-flu-update-activity.html. Updated January 26, 2018. Accessed October 29, 2018. 
    8. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (2018, June 20). What you should know about flu antiviral drugs. https://www.cdc.gov/flu/antivirals/whatyoushould.htm. Updated June 20, 2018. Accessed October 29, 2018. 
    9. World Health Organization.  How can I avoid getting the flu? https://www.who.int/features/qa/seasonal-influenza/en/. Published January 2017. Accessed October 29, 2018. 

  • CAR T-Cells: Treatment Overview, Toxicity Management, and Administration Considerations

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 11/14/2018

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells are cellular immunotherapies used for the treatment of some malignancies. This adoptive cell therapy represents a new paradigm in cancer treatment, one in which the patient’s own immune system, specifically T-cells, are engineered to treat his or her cancer. CAR T-cell therapy is a complex treatment associated with unique and serious toxicities, making education a necessity for both the patient and the health care provider. This presentation will provide an overview of CAR T-cell therapy, toxicity assessment and management strategies, administration considerations, and patient education needs for the health care provider.

    Chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells are cellular immunotherapies used for the treatment of some malignancies. This adoptive cell therapy represents a new paradigm in cancer treatment, one in which the patient’s own immune system, specifically T-cells, are engineered to treat his or her cancer. CAR T-cell therapy is a complex treatment associated with unique and serious toxicities, making education a necessity for both the patient and the health care provider. This presentation will provide an overview of CAR T-cell therapy, toxicity assessment and management strategies, administration considerations, and patient education needs for the health care provider.  

    Learning Outcomes: At the conclusion of this presentation, learners will be able to:
    • Describe the mechanism of action for CAR T-cells
    • Identify 3 common toxicities associated with CAR T-cells, as well as associated management strategies 
    • Verbalize administration considerations for CAR T-cell products

    Karen Anderson, MN, RN, AOCNS, BMTCN, CRNI®

    Infusion Manager

    Karen Anderson, MN, RN, AOCNS, BMTCN, CRNI®, is an infusion manager at the Banner University of Arizona Cancer Center in Tucson, Arizona. Previously, she was the clinical operations manager at the Bezos Family Immunotherapy Clinic at the Seattle Cancer Care Alliance, a clinic dedicated to supporting scientific advances in cellular immunotherapies and affiliated with the Fred Hutchison Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington. Her professional background includes roles in inpatient and ambulatory settings as a staff nurse, research nurse, and an oncology clinical nurse specialist. Ms. Anderson is currently a PhD student in nursing at the University of Arizona. 

    Disclosure: Kite Pharma- A Gilead Company; Consultant Fee; COI resolved

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: November 14, 2021

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.



    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.