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  • Central Vascular Access Devices: Case Studies of Complications

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 05/21/2018

    Complications related to central vascular access devices (CVADs) during insertion, management, and removal may result in increased patient morbidity and/or mortality, as well as higher health care costs. This session will discuss CVAD-associated bloodstream and local infections, dislodgment, occlusion, thrombosis, breakage, and migration.

    Complications related to central vascular access devices (CVADs) during insertion, management, and removal may result in increased patient morbidity and/or mortality, as well as higher health care costs. This session will discuss CVAD-associated bloodstream and local infections, dislodgment, occlusion, thrombosis, breakage, and migration.

    Learning Outcomes

    After the session, attendees will be able to list potential CVAD-related complications and discuss appropriate interventions for troubleshooting and resolution.

    Connie Girgenti, BSN, RN, VA-BC

    PSJMC/Vygon

    Sheri Pieroni, BSN, RN, VA-BC

    Presence Health

    CRNI® RUs: 2                                                                       
    This entire program has been approved for 2 CRNI® recertification units and meets the INS Meeting criteria.                                                                  
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS 2018 in Cleveland, OH are not eligible to receive CRNI® recertification units through this online program.

    Contact Hours: 1                                                         
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS 2018 in Cleveland, OH are not eligible to receive contact hours through this online program.

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: May 22, 2021

  • The Patient Experience: An Essential Component in Improving Health Outcomes in Home Infusion

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 05/15/2018

    Patients have been receiving infusion therapy in their homes since the 1980s. However, the demand and volume of therapies that can be infused in the home continues to rise. Many of these infusions can be administered by the patient. This webinar will explore the importance of the patient experience in improving overall health outcomes in patients who receive home infusion by examining case studies and observations from the field. The first-ever Certified Patient Experience Professional in the pharmacy field, Amanda Walker, BSN, RN, CPXP, will share what she has learned about how to improve outcomes in home infusion by creating a practice focused on the patient experience.

    Patients have been receiving infusion therapy in their homes since the 1980s. However, the demand and volume of therapies that can be infused in the home continues to rise. Many of these infusions can be administered by the patient. This webinar will explore the importance of the patient experience in improving overall health outcomes in patients who receive home infusion by examining case studies and observations from the field. The first-ever Certified Patient Experience Professional in the pharmacy field, Amanda Walker, BSN, RN, CPXP, will share what she has learned about how to improve outcomes in home infusion by creating a practice focused on the patient experience. 

    LEARNING OUTCOMES
    At the end of this presentation, learners will be able to: 
    • Identify the role of home infusion nurses in infusion therapy education, administration, and management. 
    • Explain verbally how they will use the tools discussed to evaluate their patients’ ability to infuse themselves safely or if a caregiver needs to be involved.
    • Define patient experience (PX) and describe how they will incorporate the fundamentals of PX into their nursing practice, regardless of the care setting.  

    Amanda Walker, BSN, RN, CPXP

    Senior Vice President, Patient Experience

    Amanda Walker, BSN, RN, CPXP, is the senior vice president, patient experience at Heritage Biologics, a home infusion and specialty pharmacy located just outside of Kansas City. An industry leader in patient experience, Amanda became the first Certified Patient Experience Professional (CPXP) in the pharmacy sphere and created the first patient-experience program in a pharmacy. As a member of the executive leadership team at Heritage Biologics, Amanda has woven patient experience into every element of the pharmacy’s program, unifying quality, safety, and experience strategies to improve overall patient outcomes. Before joining Heritage Biologics, she worked at the University of Kansas Hospital, serving the hematology/oncology, blood and marrow transplant inpatient population as a nurse, and later, as a clinical nurse educator, overseeing the education of more than 150 nurses and staff. Amanda’s passion for treating the whole patient has led her to become involved as a board member with the Kansas City chapter of HopeKids, a nonprofit organization which focuses on providing activities and support to children with life-threatening medical conditions and their families. 

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: May 15, 2021

  • Infusion Nurses’ Role During Disasters

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 04/25/2018

    Disasters are becoming a more common occurrence in our society. Natural disasters such as hurricanes and floods, man-made disasters such as mass shootings and workplace violence, and emerging pathogens like Ebola and SARS all touch the profession of nursing. Nursing has historically responded to society’s call for help during disasters. Infusion nurses play a pivotal role in providing patient care as part of an interdisciplinary team and may be called upon to practice in less familiar settings in the event of a disaster. This presentation explores nurses’ moral obligations during disasters from professional and individual perspectives.

    Disasters are becoming a more common occurrence in our society. Natural disasters such as hurricanes and floods, man-made disasters such as mass shootings and workplace violence, and emerging pathogens like Ebola and SARS all touch the profession of nursing. Nursing has historically responded to society’s call for help during disasters. Infusion nurses play a pivotal role in providing patient care as part of an interdisciplinary team and may be called upon to practice in less familiar settings in the event of a disaster. This presentation explores nurses’ moral obligations during disasters from professional and individual perspectives. 

    Learning Outcomes:  At the conclusion of this presentation, learners will be able to:
    1. Explicate the ethical requisite to respond to disaster. 
    2. Understand their personal requisite to respond to disaster.
    3. Weigh risks and responsibilities when personally called upon to respond to a disaster.
    4. Identify how the ANA nurses’ code of ethics directs response during a disaster.
    5. Describe the ANA position statement on risk and responsibility and understand how this document guides nursing’s response during disaster. 

    ​Donna Casey, DNP, MBE, BSN

    ANA Ethics and Human Rights Advisory Board Chair

    Donna Casey, DNP, MBE, BSN, has more than 30 years of professional nursing experience in clinical practice, education, and leadership, and is a nationally recognized leader in clinical biomedical ethics. She currently chairs the American Nurses Association’s ANA Ethics and Human Rights Advisory Board, which addresses ethical issues at the state, national, and international levels. Dr. Casey earned a BSN from the University of Virginia, a master’s degree in bioethics from University of Virginia, and a DNP from the University of Nevada. 

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: April 25, 2021

  • Episode 22: April 4, 2018 - Out on a Limb: Peripheral Infusion Therapy

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Each year in the Unites States, it’s estimated that more than 150 million short peripheral catheters and 600,000 midline catheters are used to administer everything from antibiotics to parenteral nutrition. Is the peripheral route the best choice for your infusion therapy patient? Indications, advantages, and disadvantages for peripheral infusion therapy are discussed.

    Each year in the Unites States, it’s estimated that more than 150 million short peripheral catheters and 600,000 midline catheters are used to administer everything from antibiotics to parenteral nutrition. Is the peripheral route the best choice for your infusion therapy patient? Indications, advantages, and disadvantages for peripheral infusion therapy are discussed.

    Sharon Spencer, DNP, MSN, RN

    Clinical Assistant Professor

    Sharon Spencer, DNP, MSN, RN, is a clinical assistant professor at the University of Alabama at Huntsville (UAH), College of Nursing. Her nursing career spans 33 years. Prior to her career in academia, she worked in numerous critical care areas, in outpatient services, on infusion therapy teams, and in specialty clinics, in particular urology and dermatology. Dr. Spencer earned a nursing degree from Charity School of Nursing at Delgado Community College in New Orleans, an MSN in health care systems management from Loyola University (New Orleans), and a DNP from UAH. She is a 2018 recipient of the NLN Alabama League of Nursing Lamplighter award for innovation in teaching with students, faculty and community partners. Her research interests include clinical practice issues such as infusion therapy. She is a member of Sigma and Phi Kappa Phi Honor societies.

    Guest: 
    Sharon Spencer, DNP, RN
    Clinical Assistant Professor, University of Alabama

    Each year in the Unites States, it’s estimated that more than 150 million short peripheral catheters and 600,000 midline catheters are used to administer everything from antibiotics to parenteral nutrition. Is the peripheral route the best choice for your infusion therapy patient? Indications, advantages, and disadvantages for peripheral infusion therapy are discussed.


    Information and resources:

    Spencer S, Gilliam P. The KISSSS method of peripheral I.V. catheter care. Nursing. 2017;47(6):64. doi: 10.1097/01.NURSE.0000516241.97830.41.

    Spencer S, Gilliam P. Teaching patients about their short peripheral I.V. catheters. Nursing. 2015;45(2):64. doi: 10.1097/01.NURSE.0000459801.33205.6a.

  • The 5 Why's of Injectable Medication Shortages

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 03/28/2018

    At the end of the presentation, attendees will be able to identify the impact of injectable medication shortages on patient care and learn strategies for best practices.

    Medication shortages, especially injectable drugs, cause significant risks to patients from both safety and clinical treatment aspects. Clinicians are faced with daily drug shortages in practice settings that necessitate restrictions, rationing, and sometimes rapid changes in therapies. This webinar will explain why drug shortages occur, identify the key stakeholders in drug shortage management, describe the current drug shortages, and offer predictions on how long current injectable medication shortages may last. Dr. Pasko will also discuss the impact to patient care as a result of these shortages and provide strategies for best practices.

    Learning Outcome:

    At the end of the presentation, attendees will be able to identify the impact of injectable medication shortages on patient care and learn strategies for best practices.

    Deborah A. Pasko, PharmD, MHA, BPharm

    Director Medication and Safety ASHP

    Deborah Pasko, PharmD, MHA, BPharm, is the director of medication safety and quality at the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. She earned a BPharm from Ohio Northern University, an MHA from Walden University and a PharmD from Idaho State University. She has training and experience in a number of pharmacy practices, including pediatrics, critical care, medication safety, and process improvement. In 2009, she transitioned to hospital administration at the University of Michigan, where she chaired the Pediatric Medication Safety committee and advised the adult committee until2014. She has led pediatric and adult initiatives focused on adverse drug events (ADE) and health care-acquired infection prevention, in addition to serving as lead pharmacist for safety technology implementations, including smart infusion devices and Epic EHR. Dr. Pasko’s professional interests include intravenous and oral liquid standardization, all pillars of the national ADE action plan, antimicrobial resistance and stewardship, opioid stewardship, safety technology solutions, drug shortages and population health initiatives.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: March 28, 2021

  • Episode 21: March 21, 2018 - Central Vascular Access Device Malposition

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    CVAD malposition refers to the suboptimal location of the tip of the catheter. Signs and symptoms range from the sound of “gurgling” in a patient’s ear to pneumo- or hemothorax. Malposition can lead to other complications including infiltration or extravasation. In this final episode of the series, it’s all about location, location, location.

    CVAD malposition refers to the suboptimal location of the tip of the catheter. Signs and symptoms range from the sound of “gurgling” in a patient’s ear to pneumo- or hemothorax. Malposition can lead to other complications including infiltration or extravasation. In this final episode of the series, it’s all about location, location, location.

    Crystal Miller, MA, BSN, CRNI®, NE-BC

    Nurse Manager

    Crystal Miller, MA, BSN, CRNI®, NE-BC is the nurse manager of the IV Therapy Department in the Outpatient Infusion and Mandell Multiple Sclerosis Centers at St. Francis Hospital and Medical Center in Hartford, Connecticut. She has more than 30 years’ experience in infusion nursing. Crystal served as president of the Infusion Nurses Society from 1998 to 1999 and chaired the Infusion Nurses Certification Corporation from 2011 to 2013. 

    Guest:
    Crystal Miller, MA, BSN, RN, CRNI®
    Nurse Manager, St. Frances Hospital and Medical Center, Hartford, CT

    Knowing how to treat infusion therapy-related complications means recognizing the signs and symptoms. Identifying the problem as early as possible will significantly impact positive patient outcomes. Treating the sequelae of unrecognized complications can be costly, result in poor outcomes, and decrease patient satisfaction.

    CVAD malposition refers to the suboptimal location of the tip of the catheter. Signs and symptoms range from the sound of “gurgling” in a patient’s ear to pneumo- or hemothorax. Malposition can lead to other complications including infiltration or extravasation. In this final episode of the series, it’s all about location, location, location.

  • Episode 20: March 7, 2018 - Air and Catheter Embolisms

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Our series continues with a look at two complications that while, infrequent, can have devastating consequences. Signs and symptoms can be nonspecific, but early recognition and prompt intervention are crucial to decrease the chances of harm to the patient.

    Our series continues with a look at two complications that while, infrequent, can have devastating consequences. Signs and symptoms can be nonspecific, but early recognition and prompt intervention are crucial to decrease the chances of harm to the patient. 

    Mark Hunter, BSN, RN, CRNI®, VA-BC

    Medical Affairs Manager

    Mark R. Hunter, BSN, RN, CRNI®, VA-BC, is a medical affairs manager at BD, where he focuses on medical device development, risk management, patient safety, and regulatory agency communications. He began his corporate nursing career at Baxter in 2007, where he helped drive the launch of multiple new products. A registered nurse for 27 years, Mark specialized in the fields of critical care and infusion nursing before joining industry. An active INS member, Mark has contributed to the development of INS’ Infusion Nursing Standards of Practice (2011), sessions for its annual meeting, and the CRNI® certification exam. Mark is also an editorial reviewer for the Journal of Infusion Nursing. 

    Guest:
    Mark Hunter, BSN, RN, CRNI®, VA-BC
    Medical Affairs Manager, BD

    Knowing how to treat infusion therapy-related complications means recognizing the signs and symptoms. Identifying the problem as early as possible will significantly impact positive patient outcomes. Treating the sequelae of unrecognized complications can be costly, result in poor outcomes, and decrease patient satisfaction.

    Our series continues with a look at two complications that while, infrequent, can have devastating consequences. Signs and symptoms can be nonspecific, but early recognition and prompt intervention are crucial to decrease the chances of harm to the patient. 

    References:
    Alexander M, Corrigan A, Gorski L, Phillips L.  
    Core Curriculum for Infusion Nursing. 4th ed. Wolters Kluwer Lippincott Williams & Wilkins. 2014

    Brenda L Natal, MD, MPH; Chief Editor: Erik D Schraga, MD. Venous Air Embolism Dec 2017 https://emedicine.medscape.com...
     
    Robert Wilkins, Martin Unverdorben. Accidental intravenous infusion of air, JIN 2012 pg 404-408. DOI: 10.1097/NAN.0b013e31827079fe 

    Complications of Peripheral Venous Access Devices: Prevention, Detection, and Recovery Strategies Crit Care Nurse April 1, 2017 37:e1-e14 
    http://ccn.aacnjournals.org/co...

    Something’s Missing: Peripheral Intravenous Catheter Fracture
    doi: 10.3122/jabfm.2013.06.130097 J Am Board Fam Med November-December 2013 vol. 26 no. 6 805-806
    http://www.jabfm.org/content/2...

    Fibel, Kenton H., et al. “Pressurized Intravenous Fluid Administration in the Professional Football Player.” Clinical Journal of Sport Medicine, vol. 25, no. 4, 2015, doi:10.1097/jsm.0000000000000150.

    Macklin, D. (1999). What’s physics got to do with it. a review of the physical prinicples of fluid administration. Journal of Vascular Access Devices, 7-11.

  • Episode 19: February 28, 2018 - Advocating Empowerment: A Conversation With INS 2018 Keynote Speaker Elizabeth Smart

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Like many moms, her typical day starts with a personal wake-up call from her toddler daughter, tending to her infant son, taking a quick run with her dogs, then tackling the day’s to-do list. Elizabeth Smart is a typical mom with an inconceivable story. Abducted at knife point from her home in 2002 at age 14, then raped, drugged, and abused for 9 months, the story of Elizabeth Smart’s ordeal gripped the nation. Now an advocate for survivors of sexual assault and other types of abuse, Elizabeth talks about recovering from her traumatic experience and how empowerment is a key component to victims’ survival.

    Like many moms, her typical day starts with a personal wake-up call from her toddler daughter, tending to her infant son, taking a quick run with her dogs, then tackling the day’s to-do list. Elizabeth Smart is a typical mom with an inconceivable story. Abducted at knife point from her home in 2002 at age 14, then raped, drugged, and abused for 9 months, the story of Elizabeth Smart’s ordeal gripped the nation. Now an advocate for survivors of sexual assault and other types of abuse, Elizabeth talks about recovering from her traumatic experience and how empowerment is a key component to victims’ survival.

    Interviewer: Leslie Nikou, INS Associate Managing Editor

    Guest: Elizabeth Smart
               Author/Speaker/Survivor
               INS 2018 Keynote Speaker 

    Like many moms, her typical day starts with a personal wake-up call from her toddler daughter, tending to her infant son, taking a quick run with her dogs, then tackling the day’s to-do list. Elizabeth Smart is a typical mom with an inconceivable story. Abducted at knife point from her home in 2002 at age 14, then raped, drugged, and abused for 9 months, the story of Elizabeth Smart’s ordeal gripped the nation. Now an advocate for survivors of sexual assault and other types of abuse, Elizabeth talks about recovering from her traumatic experience and how empowerment is a key component to victims’ survival.

    Information and resources:
    www.elizabethsmart.com

  • Episode 18: February 21, 2018 - Vascular Access Device Occlusion

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Occlusions can affect any vascular access device at any point during the course of treatment. We’ll identify various occlusions and what can be done to manage this potentially significant complication in both peripheral and central VADs.

    Occlusions can affect any vascular access device at any point during the course of treatment. We’ll identify various occlusions and what can be done to manage this potentially significant complication in both peripheral and central VADs.

    Guest:
    Maria Santini BSN, RN, VA-BC

    Knowing how to treat infusion therapy-related complications means recognizing the signs and symptoms. Identifying the problem as early as possible will significantly impact positive patient outcomes. Treating the sequelae of unrecognized complications can be costly, result in poor outcomes, and decrease patient satisfaction.

    Occlusions can affect any vascular access device at any point during the course of treatment. We’ll identify various occlusions and what can be done to manage this potentially significant complication in both peripheral and central VADs.

  • Using a Model of Empowerment to Create a Culture of Civility in the Practice of Infusion Nursing

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 02/20/2018

    Incivility in health care presents a significant threat to our health care system and especially to safe patient care. A hostile environment has the potential to damage collaboration among members of the health care team. Nurses are central to the infusion team and are in a position to take the lead in changing this destructive phenomenon. This presentation will review the intersection of incivility and disempowerment. It will illuminate overt and subtle behaviors that create hostile and unhealthy interactions in health care teams, which present a compelling danger to patients. The presentation will impart practical strategies to change the environment to establish a culture of civility within the infusion team. The educational strategies presented are organized by an empowerment framework developed by Worrell et al (1996) and are supported with evidence from experts in the areas of civility and empowerment. The empowerment framework includes communication, collegiality, autonomy, and accountability.

    Incivility in health care presents a significant threat to our health care system and especially to safe patient care. A hostile environment has the potential to damage collaboration among members of the health care team. Nurses are central to the infusion team and are in a position to take the lead in changing this destructive phenomenon.  This presentation will review the intersection of incivility and disempowerment.  It will illuminate overt and subtle behaviors that create hostile and unhealthy interactions in health care teams, which present a compelling danger to patients.  The presentation will impart practical strategies to change the environment to establish a culture of civility within the infusion team.  The educational strategies presented are organized by an empowerment framework developed by Worrell et al (1996) and are supported with evidence from experts in the areas of civility and empowerment.  The empowerment framework includes communication, collegiality, autonomy, and accountability.  

    Linda Shanta, PhD, MSN, RN, ANEF

    Linda L. Shanta, PhD, MSN, BS, ANEF, is a clinical associate professor and the director of the Nurse Educator Track in the College of Nursing and Professional Disciplines at the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks. Her passion for life-long learning in her field led her to study a variety of disciplines, most recently on topics of empowerment, emotional intelligence, and civility. She has held an array of leadership positions in nursing practice, education, and regulation. Dr. Shanta is currently chair of the National League for Nursing’s Education Accreditation Policy Committee. A prolific writer and speaker, she is also the recipient of numerous awards. 

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: February 20, 2021