Learning Catalog Advanced Search

Search by Category
Search in Packages
Search by Format
Search by Date Range
Products are filtered by different dates, depending on the combination of live and on-demand components that they contain, and on whether any live components are over or not.
Start
End
Search by Keyword
Sort By
  • Contains 6 Product(s)

    This Infusion Nurses Society virtual symposium addresses 5 challenging aspects involved in the delivery of infusion therapy: managing infusion reactions, preserving skin integrity, identifying and intervening with infiltrations and extravasations, and recognizing and managing implanted port complications and competency validation. Registrants will receive 5 Contact Hours and 10 Recertification Units and will have the ability to view anything they miss on-demand. This will be an informative and beneficial conference for all infusion professionals!

    This Infusion Nurses Society virtual symposium addresses 5 challenging aspects involved in the delivery of infusion therapy: managing infusion reactions, preserving skin integrity, identifying and intervening with infiltrations and extravasations, and recognizing and managing implanted port complications and competency validation. Registrants will receive 5 Contact Hours and 10 Recertification Units and will have the ability to view anything they miss on-demand. This will be an informative and beneficial conference for all infusion professionals!

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 02/16/2022 at 1:00 PM (EST)

    ​The current opioid epidemic has caused a public health crisis in the spread of blood-borne pathogens and infections in people who inject drugs (PWID). An overview of common bacterial and viral complications will include skin and soft tissue infections, spinal epidural abscess, septic pulmonary embolism, infective endocarditis, retained needles, Clostridium botulinum and C. tetani wound infections, viral hepatitis, and human immunodeficiency virus. Promoting safe injection, safe sex practices, vaccinations, and substance use treatment are integral in preventing the infection and transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Participants will come away with a better understanding of the scope of the crisis and will be able to apply their expertise when caring for patients.

    The current opioid epidemic has caused a public health crisis in the spread of blood-borne pathogens and infections in people who inject drugs (PWID). An overview of common bacterial and viral complications will include skin and soft tissue infections, spinal epidural abscess, septic pulmonary embolism, infective endocarditis, retained needles, Clostridium botulinum and C. tetani wound infections, viral hepatitis, and human immunodeficiency virus. Promoting safe injection, safe sex practices, vaccinations, and substance use treatment are integral in preventing the infection and transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Participants will come away with a better understanding of the scope of the crisis and will be able to apply their expertise when caring for patients. 

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this webinar, learners will be able to: 

    1.     Describe nursing assessment, interventions, and ongoing care of patients who inject drugs (PWID) that have an infectious complication

    2.     Identify the bacterial, fungal, and viral complications of intravenous drug use

    3.     Describe how Syringe Service Programs (SSPs) help to reduce infections in PWID

    Lynne Kokoczka, MSN, APRN-CNS, ACCNS-AG, CCRN

    Clinical Nurse Specialist

    Cleveland Clinic

    Lynne Kokoczka, MSN, APRN-CNS, ACCNS-AG, CCRN, is a clinical nurse specialist (CNS) for the Cleveland Clinic in Cleveland, Ohio. Lynne has been a registered nurse for 14 years and a CNS for 6 years. She has certifications in acute care, in adult gerontology, and in critical care. She is currently the CNS for a 64-bed medical intensive care unit which includes a subspecialty, the medical intensive liver unit. Her role includes offering expert consultation for clinical nurses.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 2 CRNI® recertification units and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: February 16, 2025

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 01/19/2022

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) provides an ongoing, continually revised list of drugs and biologic agents that meet the definition of hazardous drugs (HDs). Clinicians who prepare and administer hazardous drugs are potentially at risk by direct and indirect contact. Safe handling requirements, by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), NIOSH, USP 800, and INS 2021 Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice (SOPs), provide guidance to protect clinicians from hazardous drug exposure. Specifically, NIOSH recommends health care workers use a close system transfer device (CSTD) throughout the hazardous drug-handling chain, from drug compounding to administration. In this presentation, we will define hazardous drugs and clinician risk, discuss various safety requirements, evaluate various CSTDs, and learn to apply the INS 2021 SOPs into practice.

    image

    The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) provides an ongoing, continually revised list of drugs and biologic agents that meet the definition of hazardous drugs (HDs). Clinicians who prepare and administer hazardous drugs are potentially at risk by direct and indirect contact. Safe handling requirements, by the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), NIOSH, USP 800, and INS 2021 Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice (SOPs), provide guidance to protect clinicians from hazardous drug exposure. Specifically, NIOSH recommends health care workers use a close system transfer device (CSTD) throughout the hazardous drug-handling chain, from drug compounding to administration. In this presentation, we will define hazardous drugs and clinician risk, discuss various safety requirements, evaluate various CSTDs, and learn to apply the INS 2021 SOPs into practice. 

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this session, attendees will be able to:

    ·      Define hazardous drugs and clinician exposure risk

    ·      Verbalize various regulatory safety requirements, including OSHA, NIOSH, and USP 800

    ·      Evaluate various CSTDs for protective features

    ·      Apply into practice INS 2021 Infusion Therapy Standard of Practice #15: Hazardous Drugs and Waste

    Seth Eisenberg, RN, ASN, OCN®, BMTCN™

    Professional Practice Coordinator, Infusion Services

    Seattle Cancer Care Alliance

    Seth Eisenberg has been practicing in the field of oncology since 1983. His experience includes 35 years in bone marrow transplantation and 25 years in ambulatory oncology infusion. He has published numerous articles on chemotherapy and biotherapy, five book chapters, is as a contributing author to the Oncology Nursing Society (ONS) Safe Handling of Hazardous Drugs, and has presented nationally and internationally at nursing and pharmacy conferences. He received the 2017 March of Dimes research advancement award, the 2018 ONS Susan Baird Excellence in Clinical Writing Award, and the 2021 ONS Distinguished Award for Consistent Contribution to Nursing Literature.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 2 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: January 19, 2025

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    In celebration of IV Nurse Day, listen in as two infusion nurses describe their clinical practice, the challenges they manage, and the rewards of their profession.

    In celebration of IV Nurse Day, listen in as two infusion nurses describe their clinical practice, the challenges they manage, and the rewards of their profession.

    Host: Dawn Berndt, DNP, RN, CRNI® – Clinical Education and Publications Manager

    Guests:

    ·      Ahnalinn Prettyman, RN, CRNI® – Staff Nurse, Infusion Therapy

    ·      Shirley Rodriguez, RN –  Infusion Staff Nurse, Oncology

     In celebration of  IV Nurse Day, listen in as two infusion nurses describe their clinical practice, the challenges they manage, and the rewards of their profession.

    Resources:

    ·      INS Strong – https://www.ins1.org/about-us/iv-nurse-day/

    ·      INSider – the official membership news publication of Infusion Nurses Society: https://issuu.com/infusionnursessociety/docs/insider_jan_feb_final

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 12/15/2021

    For more than a century, vaccines have been a main factor in improving overall health and contributing to longer lifespans. However, over past few decades, people have become more reluctant to take vaccines, and this hesitancy has increased in regard to COVID-19 vaccines. How do we remain positive in a world of vaccine hesitancy? Through discussion and role-play, this session will review some factors that have led people to be vaccine hesitant and recommend how infusion nurses might discuss the COVID-19 vaccines with coworkers and patients.

    For more than a century, vaccines have been a main factor in improving overall health and contributing to longer lifespans. However, over past few decades, people have become more reluctant to take vaccines, and this hesitancy has increased in regard to COVID-19 vaccines. How do we remain positive in a world of vaccine hesitancy? Through discussion and role-play, this session will review some factors that have led people to be vaccine hesitant and recommend how infusion nurses might discuss the COVID-19 vaccines with coworkers and patients.

    Learning Objectives:  At the conclusion of this presentation, learners will be able to:

    1.     Verbalize factors that have contributed to hesitancy.

    2.     Identify steps in addressing vaccination status.

    3.     Promote positive vaccine messages.

    4.     Identify vaccine resources that the patient will accept as credible.

    5.     Ensure all staff are on board with promoting positive vaccine messages.

    Sheryl Buckner PhD, RN, ANEF

    University of Oklahoma (OU) College of Nursing

    Dr. Sheryl Buckner, a fellow in the Academy of Nursing Education for her work in Oklahoma Medical Reserve Corps and the Nursing Initiative Promoting Immunization Training, teaches at the University of Oklahoma (OU) College of Nursing, specializing in education, technology, and interprofessional collaboration. Since 2015, she has served as a National Advisory member, working with APTR, CDC, and AACN in developing Immunization Resources for Undergraduate Nursing. She has been a member of OU Interprofessional Educators and Practitioners Association (IEPA) since 2017, and in 2021, Dr. Buckner was part of a team awarded OU IEPA Team of the Year for their interprofessional work.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 2 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: December 15, 2024

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    Is it possible to use ultrasound technology for PIVC insertion without using ultrasound gel? Justin Reynolds and Emily Smith describe how to place vascular access devices using a 100% gel-free process.

    image

    Is it possible to use ultrasound technology for PIVC insertion without using ultrasound gel? Justin Reynolds and Emily Smith describe how to place vascular access devices using a 100% gel-free process.

    Emily Smith, BS, RDMS, RVT

    Clinical Marketing Specialist

    CIVCO Medical Solutions

    Emily Smith, BS, RDMS, RVT, is a clinical marketing specialist at CIVCO Medical Solutions. She has 27 years’ experience as a practicing sonographer and is board certified in OB/GYN, ABD, PS, and vascular sonography. She has been a member of the Society of Diagnostic Medical Sonography for over 15 years and holds an elected committee position. For the past 22 years, she has had the privilege to educate radiology residents, physicians, and sonographers through active scanning and didactic platforms.

    Justin Reynolds

    Product Line Manager

    CIVCO Medical Solutions

    Justin Reynolds has been with CIVCO Medical Solutions for 4 years where he serves as the product line manager for the company’s infection control offering. After taking a break from the legal profession to earn his MBA, he decided to follow a completely new career path and now enjoys the challenges and rewards of overseeing a portfolio of products dedicated to infection control in ultrasound.

    Host: Dawn Berndt, DNP, RN, CRNI® – Clinical Education and Publications Manager

    Guests:

    ·      Emily Smith, BS, RDMS, RVT – CIVCO Medical Solutions Clinical Marketing Specialist

    ·      Justin Reynolds – CIVCO Medical Solutions Product Line Manager

    Is it possible to use ultrasound technology for PIVC insertion without using ultrasound gel? Justin Reynolds and Emily Smith describe how to place vascular access devices using a 100% gel-free process.

    Resources:

    ·      CIVCO Medical Solutions

    ·      CIVCO - Envision™ Ultrasound Probe Covers & Scanning Pads

    ·      EnvisionTM Ultrasound Probe Cover Brochure 2018R-3063-REV-3.pdf (civco.com)

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 12/01/2021

    Unsafe syringe practices when administering intravenous (IV) medications can cause patient harm and impact clinician practice. The need to prepare and manipulate IV medications at the patient’s bedside can increase the chance for patient infections, disrupt nursing workflow and efficiency, and increase the chance for medication errors. Complexities involved with the care of patients isolated with COVID-19 add to the risks and impact of unsafe syringe practices and amplifies system inefficiencies. Several professional organizations, including but not limited to the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP), INS, and the Joint Commission, recommend ready-to-administer (RTA) IV medications aimed to reduce the risks involved with unsafe syringe practices. This session will provide a review of unsafe syringe practices, the impact of practice changes resulting from COVID-19, and how to integrate ready-to-use IV medications into current practice.

    image

    Unsafe syringe practices when administering intravenous (IV) medications can cause patient harm and impact clinician practice. The need to prepare and manipulate IV medications at the patient’s bedside can increase the chance for patient infections, disrupt nursing workflow and efficiency, and increase the chance for medication errors. Complexities involved with the care of patients isolated with COVID-19 add to the risks and impact of unsafe syringe practices and amplifies system inefficiencies. Several professional organizations, including but not limited to the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP), INS, and the Joint Commission, recommend ready-to-administer (RTA) IV medications aimed to reduce the risks involved with unsafe syringe practices. This session will provide a review of unsafe syringe practices, the impact of practice changes resulting from COVID-19, and how to integrate ready-to-use IV medications into current practice.

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this webinar, learners will be able to:

    ·       Describe unsafe syringe practices, including but not limited to improper use of cartridges, unnecessary dilution, mislabeling, and bedside compounding

    ·       Explore changes in practice resulting from COVID-19 and how to minimize patient/clinician risk

    ·       Verbalize the benefits of RTA IV medications and other methods to increase efficiency and how to integrate them into practice

    Judith Jacobi, Pharm.D, FCCP, MCCM, BCCCP

    Senior Consultant

    Visante

    Dr. Jacobi, a critical care clinical pharmacy specialist with 38 years of experience at the bedside, is now a senior consultant with Visante, a pharmacy consulting company. Through her role in the Voices of Vascular educational programming, she hopes to improve the safety of intravascular devices and medication administration. She has a broad publication record in critical care and has been active in many professional organizations.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 2 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: December 1, 2024

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    Can tissue adhesive play a role in improving vascular access outcomes? Listen as Marcia Wise and Bryan Davis describe the use of cyanoacrylate adhesive for securement of vascular access devices and the potential benefits of this new approach to vascular access device care and maintenance.

    image

    Can tissue adhesive play a role in improving vascular access outcomes? Listen as Marcia Wise and Bryan Davis describe the use of cyanoacrylate adhesive for securement of vascular access devices and the potential benefits of this new approach to vascular access device care and maintenance.

    Marcia Wise, RN, VA-BC

    Consultant/Clinical Educator

    Adhezion Biomedical

    Marcia Wise is currently serving as a consultant/clinical educator for Adhezion Biomedical. Throughout her career, Marcia has worked to advance nursing practice.  As a member of the Association for Vascular Access (AVA) since 1993, and the president in 1997–1998, she has become a recognized champion for patient care and the nursing profession. In recognition of her significant contributions to vascular access, Marcia was awarded the Suzanne LaVere Herbst award in 2015.  

    Bryan Davis

    Vice President, Vascular Access

    Adhezion Biomedical

    Bryan Davis began working with Adhezion Biomedical in mid-2016. He has over 25 years’ experience in the medical device and pharmaceutical industry in various roles in strategic consulting, business leadership, global marketing, strategic marketing, product management, and research and development. He spent 23 years at BD, mostly working in BD’s vascular access and infection prevention business. Over his career, he has contributed to the success of multiple market-leading products and has been awarded 23 patents relating to vascular access and infection prevention. He has an MBA from the Westminster College Gore School of Business and a BS in mechanical engineering from the University of Nebraska.

    Host: Dawn Berndt, DNP, RN, CRNI® – Clinical Education and Publications Manager

    Guests:

    ·      Marcia Wise, RN, VA-BC – Consultant/Clinical Educator, Adhezion Biomedical

    ·      Bryan Davis – Vice President, Vascular Access, Adhezion Biomedical

    Can tissue adhesive play a role in improving vascular access outcomes? Listen as Marcia Wise and Bryan Davis describe the use of cyanoacrylate adhesive for securement of vascular access devices and the potential benefits of this new approach to vascular access device care and maintenance.

    Resources:

    ·      Kleidon et al. A pilot randomized controlled trial of novel dressing and securement techniques in 101 pediatric patients. J Vasc Interv Radiol. September 2017.

    ·      Ullman et al. Innovative dressing and securement of tunneled central venous access devices in pediatrics: a pilot randomized controlled trial. BMC Cancer. August 2017.

    ·      SecurePortIV® - Adhezion Biomedical

  • Contains 1 Component(s)

    Is the approach to infection prevention and control in the home care setting different during the pandemic? Listen as Mary McGoldrick, home care and hospice consultant, discusses this important topic.

    Is the approach to infection prevention and control in the home care setting different during the pandemic? Listen as Mary McGoldrick, home care and hospice consultant, discusses this important topic.

    ​Mary McGoldrick, MS, RN, CRNI®

    Mary McGoldrick, MS, RN, CRNI® has been a pioneer in infection control in home care and hospice beginning her work in home infusion therapy in the early 1980s. In collaboration with INS, she authored the Infection Prevention and Control chapters in Infusion Nursing: An Evidence-Based Approach 3rd ed., and the Core Curriculum for Infusion Nursing 4th ed., and was a co-author of the 2016 INS Standards of Practice. In collaboration with the Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology (APIC), Ms. McGoldrick co-authored the Infection Control in Home Care and Hospice books and the Home Care Infection Prevention and Control Program manual.

    Host: Dawn Berndt, DNP, RN, CRNI® - INS Clinical Education and Publications Manager

    Guest: Mary McGoldrick, MS, RN, CRNI®, Home Health Systems, Inc.

    Is the approach to infection prevention and control in the home care setting different during the pandemic? Listen as Mary McGoldrick, home care and hospice consultant, discusses this important topic.

    Resources:

    • Home Health Systems, Inc. Home Care and Hospice Infection Prevention and Consulting
    • McGoldrick, M. (2021). Home Care Infection Prevention and Control Program, 16th ed. Naples, FL: Home Health Systems.
    • McGoldrick, M. (2020). Personal protective equipment removal: Preventing self-contamination. Home Healthcare Now, 38(3), 170-171.
    • McGoldrick, M. (2019). Electronic visit verification: Infection prevention breaches when capturing the patient’s signature. Home Healthcare Now, 37(6), 260-261.
    • McGoldrick, M. (2019). Personal protective equipment: Protecting the eyes. Home Healthcare Now, 37(4), 234-235. 
    • McGoldrick, M. (2017). Best practices for home care “bag technique” and the use of surface barriers. Home Healthcare Now, 35(9), 478-484.
  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 11/17/2021

    Phlebitis is often a significant complication of vascular access and infusion therapy. This inflammatory process of the vein may be accompanied by pain and tenderness, erythema, edema, purulence, and palpable venous cord. Clinicians must be able to assess for and identify signs and symptoms of phlebitis and take appropriate measures to mitigate complications. In this webinar, attendees will learn about the pathology of phlebitis and the inherent risks for this complication and gain an understanding of how this is addressed in the 2021 Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice and current literature.

    Phlebitis is often a significant complication of vascular access and infusion therapy. This inflammatory process of the vein may be accompanied by pain and tenderness, erythema, edema, purulence, and palpable venous cord. Clinicians must be able to assess for and identify signs and symptoms of phlebitis and take appropriate measures to mitigate complications. In this webinar, attendees will learn about the pathology of phlebitis and the inherent risks for this complication and gain an understanding of how this is addressed in the 2021 Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice and current literature.

     Learning objectives:  At the conclusion of this presentation, learners will be able to:

    A.  Define phlebitis and its varying etiologies (chemical, mechanical, infectious, or post-infusion)

    B.  Recognize the signs and symptoms of phlebitis and rate it using a standard scale or definition

    C.  Review current literature surrounding phlebitis

    D.  Discuss data collection and quality improvement strategies for phlebitis 

    ​Michelle DeVries, BS, MPH, CIC, VA-BC

    Senior Infection Control Officer

    Methodist Hospitals

    Michelle DeVries has been involved in infection prevention and hospital epidemiology for over 25 years, with a career spanning community, university, and federal health care systems. With a background in hospital and molecular epidemiology, her focus has been at the intersection of vascular access, patient safety, and infection prevention. She was a reviewer for the 2016 and 2021 Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice, wrote the chapter “Prevention of Intravascular Device-Associated Infections” for the International Federation of Infection Control’s Basic Concepts of Infection Control textbook, contributed two chapters to the Vessel Health and Preservation textbook, and has peer-reviewed for numerous publications. She is a former director with Vascular Access Certification Corporation Board, is currently on her local as well as national AVA Board, and is an adjunct research fellow with AVATAR.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 2 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: November 17, 2024

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.