INS webinars deliver the most current infusion-related topics in a 60-minute presenter-led session. Each webinar is delivered live and then archived for on-demand viewing.

Webinars

  • Demystifying Gout: Pathogenesis and Guidelines for the Management of Gout

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.08 credits offered Recorded On: 09/19/2018

    Gout is a chronic metabolic disease experienced by approximately 4% of the population of the United States. Gout is caused by the buildup of uric acid crystals in the joints, kidneys, and other body systems, and can be debilitating for patients. Early detection of gout results in significantly fewer complications over time and reduces associated comorbidities. This presentation is designed to discuss the clinical signs and symptoms of gout, identify the triggers associated with attacks of gout, examine various treatment options, and review common complications experienced by patients with gout. This session also will explore options aimed at reducing the incidence of attacks of gout, learning how to prevent complications, and understanding ways patients with gout can improve their quality of life.

    Learning Outcomes: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
    • Identify the signs and symptoms of gout.
    • Discuss the triggers and current treatments for gout.
    • Verbalize complications associated with chronic gout.

    Gout is a chronic metabolic disease experienced by approximately 4% of the population of the United States. Gout is caused by the buildup of uric acid crystals in the joints, kidneys, and other body systems, and can be debilitating for patients. Early detection of gout results in significantly fewer complications over time and reduces associated comorbidities. This presentation is designed to discuss the clinical signs and symptoms of gout, identify the triggers associated with attacks of gout, examine various treatment options, and review common complications experienced by patients with gout. This session also will explore options aimed at reducing the incidence of attacks of gout, learning how to prevent complications, and understanding ways patients with gout can improve their quality of life.

    Learning Outcomes: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
    • Identify the signs and symptoms of gout.
    • Discuss the triggers and current treatments for gout.
    • Verbalize complications associated with chronic gout.

    Vickie Sayles, BSN, RN-BC, CRNI®

    Clinical Nurse Manager

    Vickie L. Sayles, BSN, RN-BC, CRNI®, is the clinical nurse manager for the department of rheumatic and immunologic diseases at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation in Cleveland, Ohio. She is board-certified in ambulatory nursing, rheumatology nursing, and infusion nursing, and she currently serves as treasurer of the Rheumatology Nurse Society. A presenter at various conferences in the United States, Ms. Sayles has spoken on subjects such as infusion nursing, infusion medications, biologic drugs, and biosimilar drugs.

    CRNI® Recerts: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit

    Contact Hours/CE Credits: This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours

  • Unleashing the Immune System: Treatment and Adverse Event Management for the Immuno-Oncology Patient

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Recorded On: 08/22/2018

    This presentation will discuss the clinical indications, administration, and adverse-event implications of novel immuno-oncology agents. As these therapies have emerged, it is evident that the side-effect profile and management of these agents are vastly different from traditional chemotherapy. Immuno-oncology-specific education for health care workers and patients is critical to the safe delivery and implementation of high-quality care. Throughout this presentation, the background of employing the immune system to fight cancer, and using real-patient scenarios to demonstrate best practices for infusion clinicians in the care, quality, and education of the immuno-oncology patient will be explored.

    Learning Outcomes: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Identify 3 signs and symptoms of an immune-mediated adverse event.
    • Discuss the importance of early identification and treatment of adverse events.
    • Verbalize 3 different methods of education for immuno-oncology patients.

    This presentation will discuss the clinical indications, administration, and adverse-event implications of novel immuno-oncology agents. As these therapies have emerged, it is evident that the side-effect profile and management of these agents are vastly different from traditional chemotherapy. Immuno-oncology-specific education for health care workers and patients is critical to the safe delivery and implementation of high-quality care. Throughout this presentation, the background of employing the immune system to fight cancer, and using real-patient scenarios to demonstrate best practices for infusion clinicians in the care, quality, and education of the immuno-oncology patient will be explored.

    Learning Outcomes: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:

    • Identify 3 signs and symptoms of an immune-mediated adverse event.
    • Discuss the importance of early identification and treatment of adverse events.
    • Verbalize 3 different methods of education for immuno-oncology patients.

    ​Megan Derr, MSN, RN, CMSRN, AONCS®

    Megan Derr, MSN, RN, CMSRN, AONCS®, is an oncology quality and evidence-based practice specialist at the Lehigh Valley Cancer Institute in Allentown, Pennsylvania. She is certified by the Oncology Nursing Certification Corporation as an advanced oncology clinical nurse specialist. A highlight in her current role has been educating the cancer institute about immuno-oncology agents, their side effects, and adverse event management. 

    CRNI® Recerts: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit

    Contact Hours/CE Credits: This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours

  • Hazardous Infusion Drug Administration in the Home Setting

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Recorded On: 07/25/2018

    Hazardous drug (HD) agents traditionally have been administered in controlled, health care settings. However, the introduction of intravenous (IV) HDs for home administration has become an area of growing concern for home care agencies and home infusion nurses. The United States Pharmacopeia (USP) has regulated the admixture and handling of HDs for controlled settings, and its role is now expanding to include all areas in the trajectory of care. Home infusion is one aspect of care that will require nursing education, policies and procedures, and appropriate personal protective equipment. Successful implementation of USP <800> regulations will require home health infusion teams to develop a hazardous drug administration and exposure management plan to protect infusion nurses, patients and families, and the environment from toxic residue exposure. 

    Learning Outcomes: At the conclusion of this session, learners will be able to: 
    • Discuss the impact USP <800> will have on home infusion nurses.
    • Recognize the risks to nurses, patients and families, and the environment associated with intravenous (IV) drug residue exposure.
    • Identify necessary safety precautions when administering IV chemotherapy and other HDs in the home.
    • Review specific patient and family education that may prevent and/or reduce the risk of HD exposure in the home.

    Hazardous drug (HD) agents traditionally have been administered in controlled, health care settings. However, the introduction of intravenous (IV) HDs for home administration has become an area of growing concern for home care agencies and home infusion nurses. The United States Pharmacopeia (USP) has regulated the admixture and handling of HDs for controlled settings, and its role is now expanding to include all areas in the trajectory of care. Home infusion is one aspect of care that will require nursing education, policies and procedures, and appropriate personal protective equipment. Successful implementation of USP <800> regulations will require home health infusion teams to develop a hazardous drug administration and exposure management plan to protect infusion nurses, patients and families, and the environment from toxic residue exposure. 

    Learning Outcomes: At the conclusion of this session, learners will be able to: 
    • Discuss the impact USP <800> will have on home infusion nurses.
    • Recognize the risks to nurses, patients and families, and the environment associated with intravenous (IV) drug residue exposure.
    • Identify necessary safety precautions when administering IV chemotherapy and other HDs in the home.
    • Review specific patient and family education that may prevent and/or reduce the risk of HD exposure in the home.

    Cynthia Huff, MSN, RN, CRNI®, OCN®, CNL

    Home Infusion Coordinator

    Cynthia Huff, MSN, RN, CRNI®, OCN®, CNL, is a home infusion coordinator at Sutter Infusion & Pharmacy Services in Sacramento, California. Her experience as an infusion and oncology nurse spans more than 20 years. Ms. Huff’s current nursing focus is to protect health care workers, patients and families, and the environment from exposure to hazardous drug residue as the administration of oral and intravenous chemotherapy increasingly takes place in patients’ homes. Ms. Huff earned a master’s degree in nursing from the University of San Francisco (USF) and recently obtained certification as a clinical nurse leader (CNL). She is currently enrolled in USF’s doctor of nursing practice degree program, with a focus on population health leadership. Her goal is to teach nursing practice.  

    Rosangel Klein, MS, RN, CNS, OCN®

    Oncology Clinical Nurse Specialist

    Rosangel Klein, MS, RN, CNS, OCN®, is the oncology clinical nurse specialist at Sutter Roseville Medical Center. She has held a number of leadership positions at Sutter Health. Most recently, she was Sutter Health Valley Area’s interim oncology service line executive and oncology service line clinical director. As service line clinical director, she was responsible for clinical integration across the continuum of care. Before this role, she served as the regional infusion center manager for Sutter Roseville Medical Center, where she worked for 4 years and was instrumental in the growth of the infusion center. She assisted in opening a new comprehensive cancer center in 2016. Ms. Klein earned a bachelor’s degree in nursing from the University of San Francisco and completed a master’s degree in oncology nursing at the University of California San Francisco.   

    Surani Kwan, MBA, MSN, NP-BC, FACHE, FAAN

    Director for Professional Practice and Nursing Excellence

    Surani Kwan, MBA, MSN, NP-BC, FACHE, FAAN, is director for professional practice and nursing excellence for Sutter Health, where she is responsible for advancing professional practice throughout system affiliates, and providing leadership in professional development, clinical education, and training for nursing and advanced practice clinicians. She was previously the executive director of operations for the Sutter Pacific Medical Foundation. Kwan has been a member of the California Association for Nurse Practitioners for nearly 20 years and served as the association’s president for 2 terms. Currently pursuing a doctorate in nursing practice at Samuel Merritt University in Oakland, California, Kwan holds a master’s of science degree in nursing and a master’s degree in business administration. She is also a certified family nurse practitioner and a Fellow of the American Association for Nurse Practitioners and the American College of Healthcare Executives.

    CRNI® Recerts: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit

    Contact Hours/CE Credits: This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours

  • Intravenous Immunoglobulin Therapy: Treatment Approaches, Product Selection, and Administration Considerations

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Recorded On: 06/13/2018

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy is a life-saving treatment for patients with primary immune deficiency diseases. More than 75% of IVIg therapy administered in the United States is for patients with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. However, indications for use continue to increase.  In this session, we will discuss the mechanism of action of immunoglobulins, the use of IVIg therapy in certain disease states, and dosing strategies. Current standardization of product selection, approaches to dosing, and administration, which have had a positive impact on patient safety, will also be considered.  

    Learning Outcomes:  At the conclusion of this presentation, learners will be able to:

    • Verbalize 3 diagnoses for which intravenous immunoglobulin therapy is used.
    • Discuss the mechanism of action of immunoglobulins.
    • Describe approaches to dosing and administration.


    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy is a life-saving treatment for patients with primary immune deficiency diseases. More than 75% of IVIg therapy administered in the United States is for patients with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. However, indications for use continue to increase.  In this session, we will discuss the mechanism of action of immunoglobulins, the use of IVIg therapy in certain disease states, and dosing strategies. Current standardization of product selection, approaches to dosing, and administration, which have had a positive impact on patient safety, will also be considered.  

    Learning Outcomes:  At the conclusion of this presentation, learners will be able to:

    • Verbalize 3 diagnoses for which intravenous immunoglobulin therapy is used.
    • Discuss the mechanism of action of immunoglobulins.
    • Describe approaches to dosing and administration.


    Amy Clarke, RN, IgCN

    Director of Nursing Clinical Program Services

    Amy Clarke, RN, IgCN, is the director of nursing clinical program services for Diplomat Specialty Infusion Group. Involved in specialty and home infusion services since 1994, she has performed more than 2,000 intravenous and subcutaneous infusions. Ms. Clarke has delivered numerous presentations on immunoglobulin administration, including continuing education sessions for the National Home Infusion Association and the Immunoglobulin Nursing Society (IgNS). She is the immediate past president of IgNS. 

    CRNI® Recerts: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit

    Contact Hours/CE Credits: This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours

  • The Patient Experience: An Essential Component in Improving Health Outcomes in Home Infusion

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Recorded On: 05/15/2018

    Patients have been receiving infusion therapy in their homes since the 1980s. However, the demand and volume of therapies that can be infused in the home continues to rise. Many of these infusions can be administered by the patient. This webinar will explore the importance of the patient experience in improving overall health outcomes in patients who receive home infusion by examining case studies and observations from the field. The first-ever Certified Patient Experience Professional in the pharmacy field, Amanda Walker, BSN, RN, CPXP, will share what she has learned about how to improve outcomes in home infusion by creating a practice focused on the patient experience. 

    LEARNING OUTCOMES
    At the end of this presentation, learners will be able to: 
    • Identify the role of home infusion nurses in infusion therapy education, administration, and management. 
    • Explain verbally how they will use the tools discussed to evaluate their patients’ ability to infuse themselves safely or if a caregiver needs to be involved.
    • Define patient experience (PX) and describe how they will incorporate the fundamentals of PX into their nursing practice, regardless of the care setting.  

    Patients have been receiving infusion therapy in their homes since the 1980s. However, the demand and volume of therapies that can be infused in the home continues to rise. Many of these infusions can be administered by the patient. This webinar will explore the importance of the patient experience in improving overall health outcomes in patients who receive home infusion by examining case studies and observations from the field. The first-ever Certified Patient Experience Professional in the pharmacy field, Amanda Walker, BSN, RN, CPXP, will share what she has learned about how to improve outcomes in home infusion by creating a practice focused on the patient experience. 

    LEARNING OUTCOMES
    At the end of this presentation, learners will be able to: 
    • Identify the role of home infusion nurses in infusion therapy education, administration, and management. 
    • Explain verbally how they will use the tools discussed to evaluate their patients’ ability to infuse themselves safely or if a caregiver needs to be involved.
    • Define patient experience (PX) and describe how they will incorporate the fundamentals of PX into their nursing practice, regardless of the care setting.  

    Amanda Walker, BSN, RN, CPXP

    Senior Vice President, Patient Experience

    Amanda Walker, BSN, RN, CPXP, is the senior vice president, patient experience at Heritage Biologics, a home infusion and specialty pharmacy located just outside of Kansas City. An industry leader in patient experience, Amanda became the first Certified Patient Experience Professional (CPXP) in the pharmacy sphere and created the first patient-experience program in a pharmacy. As a member of the executive leadership team at Heritage Biologics, Amanda has woven patient experience into every element of the pharmacy’s program, unifying quality, safety, and experience strategies to improve overall patient outcomes. Before joining Heritage Biologics, she worked at the University of Kansas Hospital, serving the hematology/oncology, blood and marrow transplant inpatient population as a nurse, and later, as a clinical nurse educator, overseeing the education of more than 150 nurses and staff. Amanda’s passion for treating the whole patient has led her to become involved as a board member with the Kansas City chapter of HopeKids, a nonprofit organization which focuses on providing activities and support to children with life-threatening medical conditions and their families. 

    CRNI® Recerts: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit

    Contact Hours/CE Credits: This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours

  • Infusion Nurses’ Role During Disasters

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Recorded On: 04/25/2018

    Disasters are becoming a more common occurrence in our society. Natural disasters such as hurricanes and floods, man-made disasters such as mass shootings and workplace violence, and emerging pathogens like Ebola and SARS all touch the profession of nursing. Nursing has historically responded to society’s call for help during disasters. Infusion nurses play a pivotal role in providing patient care as part of an interdisciplinary team and may be called upon to practice in less familiar settings in the event of a disaster. This presentation explores nurses’ moral obligations during disasters from professional and individual perspectives. 

    Learning Outcomes:  At the conclusion of this presentation, learners will be able to:
    1. Explicate the ethical requisite to respond to disaster. 
    2. Understand their personal requisite to respond to disaster.
    3. Weigh risks and responsibilities when personally called upon to respond to a disaster.
    4. Identify how the ANA nurses’ code of ethics directs response during a disaster.
    5. Describe the ANA position statement on risk and responsibility and understand how this document guides nursing’s response during disaster. 

    Disasters are becoming a more common occurrence in our society. Natural disasters such as hurricanes and floods, man-made disasters such as mass shootings and workplace violence, and emerging pathogens like Ebola and SARS all touch the profession of nursing. Nursing has historically responded to society’s call for help during disasters. Infusion nurses play a pivotal role in providing patient care as part of an interdisciplinary team and may be called upon to practice in less familiar settings in the event of a disaster. This presentation explores nurses’ moral obligations during disasters from professional and individual perspectives. 

    Learning Outcomes:  At the conclusion of this presentation, learners will be able to:
    1. Explicate the ethical requisite to respond to disaster. 
    2. Understand their personal requisite to respond to disaster.
    3. Weigh risks and responsibilities when personally called upon to respond to a disaster.
    4. Identify how the ANA nurses’ code of ethics directs response during a disaster.
    5. Describe the ANA position statement on risk and responsibility and understand how this document guides nursing’s response during disaster. 

    ​Donna Casey, DNP, MBE, BSN

    ANA Ethics and Human Rights Advisory Board Chair

    Donna Casey, DNP, MBE, BSN, has more than 30 years of professional nursing experience in clinical practice, education, and leadership, and is a nationally recognized leader in clinical biomedical ethics. She currently chairs the American Nurses Association’s ANA Ethics and Human Rights Advisory Board, which addresses ethical issues at the state, national, and international levels. Dr. Casey earned a BSN from the University of Virginia, a master’s degree in bioethics from University of Virginia, and a DNP from the University of Nevada. 

    CRNI® Recerts: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit

    Contact Hours/CE Credits: This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours

  • The 5 Why's of Injectable Medication Shortages

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Recorded On: 03/28/2018

    Medication shortages, especially injectable drugs, cause significant risks to patients from both safety and clinical treatment aspects. Clinicians are faced with daily drug shortages in practice settings that necessitate restrictions, rationing, and sometimes rapid changes in therapies. This webinar will explain why drug shortages occur, identify the key stakeholders in drug shortage management, describe the current drug shortages, and offer predictions on how long current injectable medication shortages may last. Dr. Pasko will also discuss the impact to patient care as a result of these shortages and provide strategies for best practices.

    Learning Outcome:

    At the end of the presentation, attendees will be able to identify the impact of injectable medication shortages on patient care and learn strategies for best practices.

    Medication shortages, especially injectable drugs, cause significant risks to patients from both safety and clinical treatment aspects. Clinicians are faced with daily drug shortages in practice settings that necessitate restrictions, rationing, and sometimes rapid changes in therapies. This webinar will explain why drug shortages occur, identify the key stakeholders in drug shortage management, describe the current drug shortages, and offer predictions on how long current injectable medication shortages may last. Dr. Pasko will also discuss the impact to patient care as a result of these shortages and provide strategies for best practices.

    Learning Outcome:

    At the end of the presentation, attendees will be able to identify the impact of injectable medication shortages on patient care and learn strategies for best practices.

    Deborah A. Pasko, PharmD, MHA, BPharm

    Director Medication and Safety ASHP

    Deborah Pasko, PharmD, MHA, BPharm, is the director of medication safety and quality at the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. She earned a BPharm from Ohio Northern University, an MHA from Walden University and a PharmD from Idaho State University. She has training and experience in a number of pharmacy practices, including pediatrics, critical care, medication safety, and process improvement. In 2009, she transitioned to hospital administration at the University of Michigan, where she chaired the Pediatric Medication Safety committee and advised the adult committee until2014. She has led pediatric and adult initiatives focused on adverse drug events (ADE) and health care-acquired infection prevention, in addition to serving as lead pharmacist for safety technology implementations, including smart infusion devices and Epic EHR. Dr. Pasko’s professional interests include intravenous and oral liquid standardization, all pillars of the national ADE action plan, antimicrobial resistance and stewardship, opioid stewardship, safety technology solutions, drug shortages and population health initiatives.

    CRNI® Recerts: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit

    Contact Hours/CE Credits: This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours

  • Using a Model of Empowerment to Create a Culture of Civility in the Practice of Infusion Nursing

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Recorded On: 02/20/2018

    Incivility in health care presents a significant threat to our health care system and especially to safe patient care. A hostile environment has the potential to damage collaboration among members of the health care team. Nurses are central to the infusion team and are in a position to take the lead in changing this destructive phenomenon.  This presentation will review the intersection of incivility and disempowerment.  It will illuminate overt and subtle behaviors that create hostile and unhealthy interactions in health care teams, which present a compelling danger to patients.  The presentation will impart practical strategies to change the environment to establish a culture of civility within the infusion team.  The educational strategies presented are organized by an empowerment framework developed by Worrell et al (1996) and are supported with evidence from experts in the areas of civility and empowerment.  The empowerment framework includes communication, collegiality, autonomy, and accountability.  

    Incivility in health care presents a significant threat to our health care system and especially to safe patient care. A hostile environment has the potential to damage collaboration among members of the health care team. Nurses are central to the infusion team and are in a position to take the lead in changing this destructive phenomenon.  This presentation will review the intersection of incivility and disempowerment.  It will illuminate overt and subtle behaviors that create hostile and unhealthy interactions in health care teams, which present a compelling danger to patients.  The presentation will impart practical strategies to change the environment to establish a culture of civility within the infusion team.  The educational strategies presented are organized by an empowerment framework developed by Worrell et al (1996) and are supported with evidence from experts in the areas of civility and empowerment.  The empowerment framework includes communication, collegiality, autonomy, and accountability.  

    Linda Shanta, PhD, MSN, RN, ANEF

    Linda L. Shanta, PhD, MSN, BS, ANEF, is a clinical associate professor and the director of the Nurse Educator Track in the College of Nursing and Professional Disciplines at the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks. Her passion for life-long learning in her field led her to study a variety of disciplines, most recently on topics of empowerment, emotional intelligence, and civility. She has held an array of leadership positions in nursing practice, education, and regulation. Dr. Shanta is currently chair of the National League for Nursing’s Education Accreditation Policy Committee. A prolific writer and speaker, she is also the recipient of numerous awards. 

    CRNI® Recerts: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit

    Contact Hours/CE Credits: This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours

  • Frequency of Assessment of the Short Peripheral Catheter

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Recorded On: 01/17/2018

    Short peripheral catheters (SPCs) are the most commonly used invasive device among hospitalized patients, yet nurses often underestimate the risk and the potential for serious consequences associated with peripheral access. Critically important to reducing the risks associated with SPCs are appropriate device and site selection, impeccable insertion technique, and regular and careful assessment for signs/symptoms with prompt catheter removal if present. INS established recommendations for the frequency of SPC assessment as presented in a 2012 position paper and incorporated these recommendations in the 2016 Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice. This presentation will explore and describe assessment recommendations in relation to current evidence.

    Short peripheral catheters (SPCs) are the most commonly used invasive device among hospitalized patients, yet nurses often underestimate the risk and the potential for serious consequences associated with peripheral access. Critically important to reducing the risks associated with SPCs are appropriate device and site selection, impeccable insertion technique, and regular and careful assessment for signs/symptoms with prompt catheter removal if present. INS established recommendations for the frequency of SPC assessment as presented in a 2012 position paper and incorporated these recommendations in the 2016 Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice. This presentation will explore and describe assessment recommendations in relation to current evidence.

    Lisa Gorski, MS, HHCNS, CRNI®, FAAN

    Lisa Gorski has worked as a Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) at Wheaton Franciscan Home Health & Hospice in Milwaukee, Wisconsin for more than 30 years. She received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee College of Nursing. She is the author of Fast Facts for Nurses About Home Infusion Therapy, the upcoming 7th edition of Manual of IV Therapeutics, and more than 50 journal articles related to infusion therapy. She was also an editor for INS’ 2010 textbook, Infusion Nursing: An Evidence-Based Approach and is currently working on an updated edition scheduled for 2018 release. Lisa was named CRNI® of the year by INS in 2003 and CNS of the year by the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists in 2011. In 2006, she was inducted as a Fellow into the American Academy of Nursing. Lisa served as INS President from 2007-2008 and was chair of the 2011 and 2016 INS Standards of Practice committees. She currently lectures throughout the U.S. and abroad on infusion therapy-related topics, standards development, and home health care. 

    CRNI® Recerts: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit

    Contact Hours/CE Credits: This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours

  • Infusion Alliances – A New Approach to Familiar Problems

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Recorded On: 12/06/2017

    Infusion therapy continues to grow rapidly with an aging population, new and enhanced types of therapies, extensive development of new technologies, and expansion into all venues of healthcare. Infusion therapy involves many stakeholders from different professions, departments within a single organization, and across different organizations in a variety of healthcare venues. The days of each profession or organization practicing in silos with limited and ineffective communication should be gone. 

    Alliances, also known as collaboratives, partnerships, and coalitions, in healthcare have had a tumultuous start, but could offer the promise for improvement in infusion therapy. All stakeholders must be identified and involved to bring about effective collaboration, collective decision-making, and interdependence. This presentation will apply the concept of an alliance to the practice of infusion therapy and explore what is needed for this approach to improve patient care.  

    Infusion therapy continues to grow rapidly with an aging population, new and enhanced types of therapies, extensive development of new technologies, and expansion into all venues of healthcare. Infusion therapy involves many stakeholders from different professions, departments within a single organization, and across different organizations in a variety of healthcare venues. The days of each profession or organization practicing in silos with limited and ineffective communication should be gone. 

    Alliances, also known as collaboratives, partnerships, and coalitions, in healthcare have had a tumultuous start, but could offer the promise for improvement in infusion therapy. All stakeholders must be identified and involved to bring about effective collaboration, collective decision-making, and interdependence. This presentation will apply the concept of an alliance to the practice of infusion therapy and explore what is needed for this approach to improve patient care.  

    Lynn Hadaway M.Ed, RN-BC, CRNI®

    CRNI® Recerts: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit

    Contact Hours/CE Credits: This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours