INS webinars deliver the most current infusion-related topics in a 60-minute presenter-led session. Each webinar is delivered live and then archived for on-demand viewing. All webinars are free to INS members.

Webinars

  • Health Care of the Future: How Nurses Can Fix the Hospital

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered Includes a Live Event on 06/19/2019 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    In this era of rapid change in health care, nurses must become aware of the opportunities available to contribute. By examining not only nursing’s past, but also its future, various methods emerge that add the all-important nursing voice to the evolution of health care. In addition, examining the National Academy of Medicine’s report and update on the Future of Nursing 2030 suggests further opportunities to contribute. Included in this presentation is a discussion of technology as it contributes to advances in care.

    In this era of rapid change in health care, nurses must become aware of the opportunities available to contribute. By examining not only nursing’s past, but also its future, various methods emerge that add the all-important nursing voice to the evolution of health care. In addition, examining the National Academy of Medicine’s report and update on the Future of Nursing 2030 suggests further opportunities to contribute. Included in this presentation is a discussion of technology as it contributes to advances in care.

    Learning Outcomes: At the end of this presentation the participant will be able to:
    • Describe the role of the registered nurse in the future
    • Describe the Institute of Medicine’s recommendations as they pertain to the nurses’ role
    • Understand strategic practices for developing the nursing role

    Adele Webb, PhD, RN, FNAP, FAAN

    Assistant Dean, Capella University

    Adele Webb, PhD, RN, FNAP, FAAN, is an assistant dean at Capella University. Her focus is on international nurse capacity development as it relates to both communicable and non-communicable diseases. She has received extensive funding for her international work and has published her findings in several refereed journals. Adele has contributed to World Health Organization guidelines, testified to the Institute of Medicine, and given testimony to the White House on nursing workforce issues. She continues to collaborate with the WHO as well as the World NCD Congress, and these efforts have helped contribute to improved nurse capacity in health care systems across 43 countries.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: June 19, 2022

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • Short Peripheral Intravenous Access: A Risk/Benefit Analysis

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered Recorded On: 05/08/2019

    As the most common procedure performed in the acute care setting, insertion of the short peripheral intravenous (IV) catheter is a basic nursing skill. It is, however, far from benign. There is a lack of standardized education and competency assessment in this foundational skill. In addition, a lack of validated assessment tools has hindered accurate evaluation of the patient harm caused by complications such as infiltration, extravasation, phlebitis, and infection. This presentation will provide an overview and respond to audience questions regarding the use of short peripheral IV access and its role in the current standard of practice, the potential complications that arise with use, and strategies to optimize outcomes in the management of short peripheral IV access.

    As the most common procedure performed in the acute care setting, insertion of the short peripheral intravenous (IV) catheter is a basic nursing skill. It is, however, far from benign. There is a lack of standardized education and competency assessment in this foundational skill. In addition, a lack of validated assessment tools has hindered accurate evaluation of the patient harm caused by complications such as infiltration, extravasation, phlebitis, and infection. This presentation will provide an overview and respond to audience questions regarding the use of short peripheral IV access and its role in the current standard of practice, the potential complications that arise with use, and strategies to optimize outcomes in the management of short peripheral IV access.

    Learning Outcomes: At the conclusion of the webinar, the participant will be able to:
    • Identify two complications of short peripheral catheter access that may cause patient harm
    • Describe two evidence-based strategies to optimize outcomes in short peripheral catheter management

    Lisa Gorski, MS, RN, HHCNS-BC, CRNI®, FAAN

    Wheaton Franciscan Home Health & Hospice

    Lisa Gorski, MS, RN, HHCNS-BC, CRNI®, FAAN, is a clinical nurse specialist at Wheaton Franciscan Home Health and Hospice, a part of Ascension Health at Home. A fellow of the American Academy of Nursing, she has authored several books on infusion therapy, as well as more than 50 journal articles and book chapters. Ms. Gorski is chair of Infusion Nurses Society’s Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice Committee.

    Barb Nickel, APRN-CNS, NP-C, CRNI®, CCRN

    Clinical Nurse Specialist

    Barb Nickel, APRN-CNS, NP-C, CRNI®, CCRN, has extensive experience in the application of evidence-based guidelines relevant to infusion therapy practice. As a clinical nurse specialist, she is actively involved in infusion-related process improvement at the facility and statewide level, regarding topics such as CLABSI prevention, new graduate training, and smart pump drug library standardization. From 2011 to 2016, Ms. Nickel was a member, then chair/lead nurse-planner for INS’ National Council on Education. She was also a reviewer for both the 2011 and the 2016 Infusion Nursing Standards of Practice.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: May 8, 2022

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • Non-suicidal Self-Injury (NSSI): Adolescent Truths

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered Recorded On: 04/10/2019

    Non-suicidal self-injury is behavior with intent to inflict short-term physical pain rather than deal with emotional pain. Not only is this phenomenon increasing, but clinicians still lack understanding regarding why individuals partake in this behavior. Although counter-intuitive, those who self-harm attempt to replace their emotional pain with physical pain. This presentation is intended to stimulate thought in those who provide assessment and treatment of the adolescent population, primarily in those with emotional disorders. A short case study and discussion of best practice will be discussed.

    Non-suicidal self-injury is behavior with intent to inflict short-term physical pain rather than deal with emotional pain. Not only is this phenomenon increasing, but clinicians still lack understanding regarding why individuals partake in this behavior. Although counter-intuitive, those who self-harm attempt to replace their emotional pain with physical pain. This presentation is intended to stimulate thought in those who provide assessment and treatment of the adolescent population, primarily in those with emotional disorders. A short case study and discussion of best practice will be discussed.

    Learning Outcomes:
    At the end of this educational activity, learners will be able to:
    • Describe what NSSI is and what it is not
    • Describe how NSSI has changed since first identified in 1993
    • Determine who it affects
    • Understand how NSSI is portrayed in or propagated by media
    • Communicate what can be done to reduce this phenomenon 

    Renee Bauer, PhD, MS, RN

    Indiana State University

    Renee Bauer, PhD, MS, RN, is an associate professor at Indiana State University. Dr. Bauer teaches classes that encompass assessment to medical-surgical nursing and has been the director of second degree students for the past 8 years. She has more than 25 years of experience as a nurse (primarily in a psychiatric setting), and her work has been published by more than 25 publications. She is an officer of Sigma Theta Tau honor society, and a member of other organizations such as the National League of Nursing and the Indiana State Board of Nursing. She is currently pursuing a certificate to become a psychiatric nurse practitioner.

    Disclosure: There is no conflict of interest for anyone with the ability to control content of the activity. No conflict of interest to report

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: April 10, 2022

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • Sepsis Management

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered Recorded On: 03/13/2019

    Sepsis is a medical emergency that may include long-term health and social consequences for the affected individuals and their families. In recent years, health care professionals have made great strides in understanding the pathophysiology of sepsis which have led to earlier diagnosis and improved patient outcomes. This webinar will discuss the most recent changes in early detection methods and the new tools available for physicians and nurses that help identify the symptoms of sepsis sooner.

    Sepsis is a medical emergency that may include long-term health and social consequences for the affected individuals and their families. In recent years, health care professionals have made great strides in understanding the pathophysiology of sepsis which have led to earlier diagnosis and improved patient outcomes. This webinar will discuss the most recent changes in early detection methods and the new tools available for physicians and nurses that help identify the symptoms of sepsis sooner.

    Learning Outcomes:
    At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:
    1) Define sepsis and septic shock
    2) Recognize the importance of early identification of patients with sepsis
    3) Discuss best practices for treating sepsis

    Emily Cannon, DNP, MS, BS, RN

    Indiana State University

    Emily Cannon, DNP, MS, BS, RN, is an instructor in the baccalaureate nursing program at Indiana State University since 2012, where she teaches medical-surgical nursing. From 2003 to 2012, she was a member of the nursing faculty at Ivy Technical Community College. Prior to that role, she was a medical-surgical float nurse and an infection control practitioner at Union Hospital in Terre Haute, Indiana. Emily earned an associate of science degree in nursing from Vincennes University in 1995 and went on to complete a bachelor of science degree and a master’s degree in nursing from Indiana Wesleyan University. In May 2015, she completed a doctoral program in nursing practice at Indiana State University.

    Disclosure: There is no conflict of interest for anyone with the ability to control content of the activity. No conflict of interest to report

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: March 13, 2022

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • Short Peripheral Catheter Infiltration: Minimizing Risks to Improve Outcomes

    Contains 3 Component(s), 1 credit offered Recorded On: 02/13/2019

    Hospitalized patients receiving medications or fluids via short peripheral catheters (SPCs) are at risk for infiltration. Infiltration can increase patient length of stay, result in repeated vascular access procedures, increase costs by use of supplies and nursing time, lead to short-term and long-term patient harm, and decrease patient satisfaction. Early detection of infiltration can minimize risks by prompt intervention. Quality improvement projects have been directed toward staff education on SPC insertion, maintenance, assessment, and monitoring. This webinar will discuss current research and practice initiatives, as well as the benefits of emerging technology aimed at reducing infiltration.

    Commercial Support: ivWatch

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    Hospitalized patients receiving medications or fluids via short peripheral catheters (SPCs) are at risk for infiltration. Infiltration can increase patient length of stay, result in repeated vascular access procedures, increase costs by use of supplies and nursing time, lead to short-term and long-term patient harm, and decrease patient satisfaction. Early detection of infiltration can minimize risks by prompt intervention. Quality improvement projects have been directed toward staff education on SPC insertion, maintenance, assessment, and monitoring. This webinar will discuss current research and practice initiatives, as well as the benefits of emerging technology aimed at reducing infiltration.

    Learning Outcomes:
    At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
    1. Identify risk factors associated with SPC infiltration
    2. Describe the benefits of early and ongoing assessment to detect infiltration 

    Gregory Schears, MD

    Mayo Clinic

    Gregory J. Schears, MD, is a pediatric intensivist and anesthesiologist at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota. He has had a long-standing interest in reducing patient complications and improving the approach to vascular access. He is a consultant to the department of anesthesiology and the division of pediatric critical care medicine, the physician liaison to the nurse-led peripherally inserted central catheter team, and is also the comedical director of the cardiovascular pediatric surgical intensive care unit. An associate  professor of anesthesiology, Dr. Schears has presented locally, regionally, nationally, and internationally.

    Disclosure: ivWatch; Consultant Fee; COI resolved

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: February 13, 2022

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.