INS webinars deliver the most current infusion-related topics in a 60-minute presenter-led session. Each webinar is delivered live and then archived for on-demand viewing.

Webinars

  • Intravenous Immunoglobulin Therapy: Treatment Approaches, Product Selection, and Administration Considerations

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Includes a Live Event on 06/13/2018 at 1:00 PM (EDT)

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy is a life-saving treatment for patients with primary immune deficiency diseases. More than 75% of IVIg therapy administered in the United States is for patients with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. However, indications for use continue to increase.  In this session, we will discuss the mechanism of action of immunoglobulins, the use of IVIg therapy in certain disease states, and dosing strategies. Current standardization of product selection, approaches to dosing, and administration, which have had a positive impact on patient safety, will also be considered.  

    Learning Outcomes:  At the conclusion of this presentation, learners will be able to:

    • Verbalize 3 diagnoses for which intravenous immunoglobulin therapy is used.
    • Discuss the mechanism of action of immunoglobulins.
    • Describe approaches to dosing and administration.


    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) therapy is a life-saving treatment for patients with primary immune deficiency diseases. More than 75% of IVIg therapy administered in the United States is for patients with autoimmune and inflammatory diseases. However, indications for use continue to increase.  In this session, we will discuss the mechanism of action of immunoglobulins, the use of IVIg therapy in certain disease states, and dosing strategies. Current standardization of product selection, approaches to dosing, and administration, which have had a positive impact on patient safety, will also be considered.  

    Learning Outcomes:  At the conclusion of this presentation, learners will be able to:

    • Verbalize 3 diagnoses for which intravenous immunoglobulin therapy is used.
    • Discuss the mechanism of action of immunoglobulins.
    • Describe approaches to dosing and administration.


    Amy Clarke, RN, IgCN

    Director of Nursing Clinical Program Services

    Amy Clarke, RN, IgCN, is the director of nursing clinical program services for Diplomat Specialty Infusion Group. Involved in specialty and home infusion services since 1994, she has performed more than 2,000 intravenous and subcutaneous infusions. Ms. Clarke has delivered numerous presentations on immunoglobulin administration, including continuing education sessions for the National Home Infusion Association and the Immunoglobulin Nursing Society (IgNS). She is the immediate past president of IgNS. 

    CRNI® Recerts: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit

    Contact Hours/CE Credits: This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours

  • The Patient Experience: An Essential Component in Improving Health Outcomes in Home Infusion

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Recorded On: 05/15/2018

    Patients have been receiving infusion therapy in their homes since the 1980s. However, the demand and volume of therapies that can be infused in the home continues to rise. Many of these infusions can be administered by the patient. This webinar will explore the importance of the patient experience in improving overall health outcomes in patients who receive home infusion by examining case studies and observations from the field. The first-ever Certified Patient Experience Professional in the pharmacy field, Amanda Walker, BSN, RN, CPXP, will share what she has learned about how to improve outcomes in home infusion by creating a practice focused on the patient experience. 

    LEARNING OUTCOMES
    At the end of this presentation, learners will be able to: 
    • Identify the role of home infusion nurses in infusion therapy education, administration, and management. 
    • Explain verbally how they will use the tools discussed to evaluate their patients’ ability to infuse themselves safely or if a caregiver needs to be involved.
    • Define patient experience (PX) and describe how they will incorporate the fundamentals of PX into their nursing practice, regardless of the care setting.  

    Patients have been receiving infusion therapy in their homes since the 1980s. However, the demand and volume of therapies that can be infused in the home continues to rise. Many of these infusions can be administered by the patient. This webinar will explore the importance of the patient experience in improving overall health outcomes in patients who receive home infusion by examining case studies and observations from the field. The first-ever Certified Patient Experience Professional in the pharmacy field, Amanda Walker, BSN, RN, CPXP, will share what she has learned about how to improve outcomes in home infusion by creating a practice focused on the patient experience. 

    LEARNING OUTCOMES
    At the end of this presentation, learners will be able to: 
    • Identify the role of home infusion nurses in infusion therapy education, administration, and management. 
    • Explain verbally how they will use the tools discussed to evaluate their patients’ ability to infuse themselves safely or if a caregiver needs to be involved.
    • Define patient experience (PX) and describe how they will incorporate the fundamentals of PX into their nursing practice, regardless of the care setting.  

    Amanda Walker, BSN, RN, CPXP

    Senior Vice President, Patient Experience

    Amanda Walker, BSN, RN, CPXP, is the senior vice president, patient experience at Heritage Biologics, a home infusion and specialty pharmacy located just outside of Kansas City. An industry leader in patient experience, Amanda became the first Certified Patient Experience Professional (CPXP) in the pharmacy sphere and created the first patient-experience program in a pharmacy. As a member of the executive leadership team at Heritage Biologics, Amanda has woven patient experience into every element of the pharmacy’s program, unifying quality, safety, and experience strategies to improve overall patient outcomes. Before joining Heritage Biologics, she worked at the University of Kansas Hospital, serving the hematology/oncology, blood and marrow transplant inpatient population as a nurse, and later, as a clinical nurse educator, overseeing the education of more than 150 nurses and staff. Amanda’s passion for treating the whole patient has led her to become involved as a board member with the Kansas City chapter of HopeKids, a nonprofit organization which focuses on providing activities and support to children with life-threatening medical conditions and their families. 

    CRNI® Recerts: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit

    Contact Hours/CE Credits: This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours

  • Infusion Nurses’ Role During Disasters

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Recorded On: 04/25/2018

    Disasters are becoming a more common occurrence in our society. Natural disasters such as hurricanes and floods, man-made disasters such as mass shootings and workplace violence, and emerging pathogens like Ebola and SARS all touch the profession of nursing. Nursing has historically responded to society’s call for help during disasters. Infusion nurses play a pivotal role in providing patient care as part of an interdisciplinary team and may be called upon to practice in less familiar settings in the event of a disaster. This presentation explores nurses’ moral obligations during disasters from professional and individual perspectives. 

    Learning Outcomes:  At the conclusion of this presentation, learners will be able to:
    1. Explicate the ethical requisite to respond to disaster. 
    2. Understand their personal requisite to respond to disaster.
    3. Weigh risks and responsibilities when personally called upon to respond to a disaster.
    4. Identify how the ANA nurses’ code of ethics directs response during a disaster.
    5. Describe the ANA position statement on risk and responsibility and understand how this document guides nursing’s response during disaster. 

    Disasters are becoming a more common occurrence in our society. Natural disasters such as hurricanes and floods, man-made disasters such as mass shootings and workplace violence, and emerging pathogens like Ebola and SARS all touch the profession of nursing. Nursing has historically responded to society’s call for help during disasters. Infusion nurses play a pivotal role in providing patient care as part of an interdisciplinary team and may be called upon to practice in less familiar settings in the event of a disaster. This presentation explores nurses’ moral obligations during disasters from professional and individual perspectives. 

    Learning Outcomes:  At the conclusion of this presentation, learners will be able to:
    1. Explicate the ethical requisite to respond to disaster. 
    2. Understand their personal requisite to respond to disaster.
    3. Weigh risks and responsibilities when personally called upon to respond to a disaster.
    4. Identify how the ANA nurses’ code of ethics directs response during a disaster.
    5. Describe the ANA position statement on risk and responsibility and understand how this document guides nursing’s response during disaster. 

    ​Donna Casey, DNP, MBE, BSN

    ANA Ethics and Human Rights Advisory Board Chair

    Donna Casey, DNP, MBE, BSN, has more than 30 years of professional nursing experience in clinical practice, education, and leadership, and is a nationally recognized leader in clinical biomedical ethics. She currently chairs the American Nurses Association’s ANA Ethics and Human Rights Advisory Board, which addresses ethical issues at the state, national, and international levels. Dr. Casey earned a BSN from the University of Virginia, a master’s degree in bioethics from University of Virginia, and a DNP from the University of Nevada. 

    CRNI® Recerts: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit

    Contact Hours/CE Credits: This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours

  • The 5 Why's of Injectable Medication Shortages

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Recorded On: 03/28/2018

    Medication shortages, especially injectable drugs, cause significant risks to patients from both safety and clinical treatment aspects. Clinicians are faced with daily drug shortages in practice settings that necessitate restrictions, rationing, and sometimes rapid changes in therapies. This webinar will explain why drug shortages occur, identify the key stakeholders in drug shortage management, describe the current drug shortages, and offer predictions on how long current injectable medication shortages may last. Dr. Pasko will also discuss the impact to patient care as a result of these shortages and provide strategies for best practices.

    Learning Outcome:

    At the end of the presentation, attendees will be able to identify the impact of injectable medication shortages on patient care and learn strategies for best practices.

    Medication shortages, especially injectable drugs, cause significant risks to patients from both safety and clinical treatment aspects. Clinicians are faced with daily drug shortages in practice settings that necessitate restrictions, rationing, and sometimes rapid changes in therapies. This webinar will explain why drug shortages occur, identify the key stakeholders in drug shortage management, describe the current drug shortages, and offer predictions on how long current injectable medication shortages may last. Dr. Pasko will also discuss the impact to patient care as a result of these shortages and provide strategies for best practices.

    Learning Outcome:

    At the end of the presentation, attendees will be able to identify the impact of injectable medication shortages on patient care and learn strategies for best practices.

    Deborah A. Pasko, PharmD, MHA, BPharm

    Director Medication and Safety ASHP

    Deborah Pasko, PharmD, MHA, BPharm, is the director of medication safety and quality at the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists. She earned a BPharm from Ohio Northern University, an MHA from Walden University and a PharmD from Idaho State University. She has training and experience in a number of pharmacy practices, including pediatrics, critical care, medication safety, and process improvement. In 2009, she transitioned to hospital administration at the University of Michigan, where she chaired the Pediatric Medication Safety committee and advised the adult committee until2014. She has led pediatric and adult initiatives focused on adverse drug events (ADE) and health care-acquired infection prevention, in addition to serving as lead pharmacist for safety technology implementations, including smart infusion devices and Epic EHR. Dr. Pasko’s professional interests include intravenous and oral liquid standardization, all pillars of the national ADE action plan, antimicrobial resistance and stewardship, opioid stewardship, safety technology solutions, drug shortages and population health initiatives.

    CRNI® Recerts: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit

    Contact Hours/CE Credits: This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours

  • Using a Model of Empowerment to Create a Culture of Civility in the Practice of Infusion Nursing

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Recorded On: 02/20/2018

    Incivility in health care presents a significant threat to our health care system and especially to safe patient care. A hostile environment has the potential to damage collaboration among members of the health care team. Nurses are central to the infusion team and are in a position to take the lead in changing this destructive phenomenon.  This presentation will review the intersection of incivility and disempowerment.  It will illuminate overt and subtle behaviors that create hostile and unhealthy interactions in health care teams, which present a compelling danger to patients.  The presentation will impart practical strategies to change the environment to establish a culture of civility within the infusion team.  The educational strategies presented are organized by an empowerment framework developed by Worrell et al (1996) and are supported with evidence from experts in the areas of civility and empowerment.  The empowerment framework includes communication, collegiality, autonomy, and accountability.  

    Incivility in health care presents a significant threat to our health care system and especially to safe patient care. A hostile environment has the potential to damage collaboration among members of the health care team. Nurses are central to the infusion team and are in a position to take the lead in changing this destructive phenomenon.  This presentation will review the intersection of incivility and disempowerment.  It will illuminate overt and subtle behaviors that create hostile and unhealthy interactions in health care teams, which present a compelling danger to patients.  The presentation will impart practical strategies to change the environment to establish a culture of civility within the infusion team.  The educational strategies presented are organized by an empowerment framework developed by Worrell et al (1996) and are supported with evidence from experts in the areas of civility and empowerment.  The empowerment framework includes communication, collegiality, autonomy, and accountability.  

    Linda Shanta, PhD, MSN, RN, ANEF

    Linda L. Shanta, PhD, MSN, BS, ANEF, is a clinical associate professor and the director of the Nurse Educator Track in the College of Nursing and Professional Disciplines at the University of North Dakota in Grand Forks. Her passion for life-long learning in her field led her to study a variety of disciplines, most recently on topics of empowerment, emotional intelligence, and civility. She has held an array of leadership positions in nursing practice, education, and regulation. Dr. Shanta is currently chair of the National League for Nursing’s Education Accreditation Policy Committee. A prolific writer and speaker, she is also the recipient of numerous awards. 

    CRNI® Recerts: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit

    Contact Hours/CE Credits: This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours

  • Frequency of Assessment of the Short Peripheral Catheter

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Recorded On: 01/17/2018

    Short peripheral catheters (SPCs) are the most commonly used invasive device among hospitalized patients, yet nurses often underestimate the risk and the potential for serious consequences associated with peripheral access. Critically important to reducing the risks associated with SPCs are appropriate device and site selection, impeccable insertion technique, and regular and careful assessment for signs/symptoms with prompt catheter removal if present. INS established recommendations for the frequency of SPC assessment as presented in a 2012 position paper and incorporated these recommendations in the 2016 Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice. This presentation will explore and describe assessment recommendations in relation to current evidence.

    Short peripheral catheters (SPCs) are the most commonly used invasive device among hospitalized patients, yet nurses often underestimate the risk and the potential for serious consequences associated with peripheral access. Critically important to reducing the risks associated with SPCs are appropriate device and site selection, impeccable insertion technique, and regular and careful assessment for signs/symptoms with prompt catheter removal if present. INS established recommendations for the frequency of SPC assessment as presented in a 2012 position paper and incorporated these recommendations in the 2016 Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice. This presentation will explore and describe assessment recommendations in relation to current evidence.

    Lisa Gorski, MS, HHCNS, CRNI®, FAAN

    Lisa Gorski has worked as a Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) at Wheaton Franciscan Home Health & Hospice in Milwaukee, Wisconsin for more than 30 years. She received her bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee College of Nursing. She is the author of Fast Facts for Nurses About Home Infusion Therapy, the upcoming 7th edition of Manual of IV Therapeutics, and more than 50 journal articles related to infusion therapy. She was also an editor for INS’ 2010 textbook, Infusion Nursing: An Evidence-Based Approach and is currently working on an updated edition scheduled for 2018 release. Lisa was named CRNI® of the year by INS in 2003 and CNS of the year by the National Association of Clinical Nurse Specialists in 2011. In 2006, she was inducted as a Fellow into the American Academy of Nursing. Lisa served as INS President from 2007-2008 and was chair of the 2011 and 2016 INS Standards of Practice committees. She currently lectures throughout the U.S. and abroad on infusion therapy-related topics, standards development, and home health care. 

    CRNI® Recerts: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit

    Contact Hours/CE Credits: This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours

  • Infusion Alliances – A New Approach to Familiar Problems

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Recorded On: 12/06/2017

    Infusion therapy continues to grow rapidly with an aging population, new and enhanced types of therapies, extensive development of new technologies, and expansion into all venues of healthcare. Infusion therapy involves many stakeholders from different professions, departments within a single organization, and across different organizations in a variety of healthcare venues. The days of each profession or organization practicing in silos with limited and ineffective communication should be gone. 

    Alliances, also known as collaboratives, partnerships, and coalitions, in healthcare have had a tumultuous start, but could offer the promise for improvement in infusion therapy. All stakeholders must be identified and involved to bring about effective collaboration, collective decision-making, and interdependence. This presentation will apply the concept of an alliance to the practice of infusion therapy and explore what is needed for this approach to improve patient care.  

    Infusion therapy continues to grow rapidly with an aging population, new and enhanced types of therapies, extensive development of new technologies, and expansion into all venues of healthcare. Infusion therapy involves many stakeholders from different professions, departments within a single organization, and across different organizations in a variety of healthcare venues. The days of each profession or organization practicing in silos with limited and ineffective communication should be gone. 

    Alliances, also known as collaboratives, partnerships, and coalitions, in healthcare have had a tumultuous start, but could offer the promise for improvement in infusion therapy. All stakeholders must be identified and involved to bring about effective collaboration, collective decision-making, and interdependence. This presentation will apply the concept of an alliance to the practice of infusion therapy and explore what is needed for this approach to improve patient care.  

    Lynn Hadaway M.Ed, RN-BC, CRNI®

    CRNI® Recerts: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit

    Contact Hours/CE Credits: This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours

  • Recognizing and Preventing Tumor Lysis Syndrome

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Recorded On: 11/15/2017

    Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) is a metabolic oncologic emergency characterized by the rapid destruction of neoplastic cells. TLS usually occurs after the initiation of antineoplastic therapy.  Large amounts of intracellular components are released into the bloodstream, posing life-threatening complications including, acid-base disturbances, electrolyte imbalances and kidney injury.  This presentation will allow nurses to recognize patients at risk for TLS and perform the necessary interventions to prevent or manage this fatal complication.

    Tumor lysis syndrome (TLS) is a metabolic oncologic emergency characterized by the rapid destruction of neoplastic cells. TLS usually occurs after the initiation of antineoplastic therapy.  Large amounts of intracellular components are released into the bloodstream, posing life-threatening complications including, acid-base disturbances, electrolyte imbalances and kidney injury.  This presentation will allow nurses to recognize patients at risk for TLS and perform the necessary interventions to prevent or manage this fatal complication.

    Karen Iyere

    Karen Iyere earned her bachelor’s degree in nursing from Howard University in 2012. She worked as a registered nurse for 1 year before earning her master’s degree in nursing from Georgia State University. During her master’s schooling, Ms. Iyere worked full time at the Veterans Affairs Hospital in Decatur, Georgia on the medical-oncology unit, where she realized her passion for caring for veterans who were newly diagnosed with cancer. Ms. Iyere’s clinical rotation at Emory University Hospital in Atlanta, Georgia allowed her to explore oncologic disease processes with a more diverse population. She observed and studied patients on the various oncology units including, bone-marrow transplant, medical-oncology, and hematology. Her dedication to nursing practice and oncology led her to co-author a series of 3 clinical articles on oncology emergency that were published in Nursing 2016 and Nursing 2017. Ms. Iyere is currently an adult-gerontology nurse practitioner and acute care clinical nurse specialist for adults and geriatric population in Atlanta, Georgia area.

    CRNI® Recerts: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit

    Contact Hours/CE Credits: This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours

  • Pediatric Hemophilia Care and Treatment

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Recorded On: 01/24/2017

    Hemophilia is a congenital blood disorder that prevents the formation of fibrin, which allows for sustained clotting. People with hemophilia are missing or have reduced amounts of this important clotting factor, so bleeding continues until they receive treatment.

    Hemophilia is not a disorder that is often seen in a hospital setting, and because of the variety of factor deficits and classifications, the care of each patient differs. The care and nursing management of a pediatric patient with hemophilia is often intimidating for the family, as well as for the professional care giver.

    Hemophilia is a congenital blood disorder that prevents the formation of fibrin, which allows for sustained clotting. People with hemophilia are missing or have reduced amounts of this important clotting factor, so bleeding continues until they receive treatment.

    Hemophilia is not a disorder that is often seen in a hospital setting, and because of the variety of factor deficits and classifications, the care of each patient differs. The care and nursing management of a pediatric patient with hemophilia is often intimidating for the family, as well as for the professional care giver.

    Catherine J. Taggart, RN, CRNI®, IgCN, MBA

    President and CEO, Agility Infusion Services

    Catherine has worked within the Baxter/Baxalta organization as a Medical Affairs Nurse Specialist and as home infusion clinician for more than 25 years. She has extensive infusion knowledge in a variety of clinical settings employing cutting edge therapies and methods. She has participated in several clinical study trials targeting positive patient outcomes, bringing the results to publication. She is a seasoned infusion professional and has great passion for the patient.

    This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours

  • Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice 2016

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered

    Overview: As the recognized global authority in infusion therapy, INS is committed to advancing the specialty through evidence-based practice and research. A major component of that commitment is the development of standards of practice for all clinicians involved in infusion therapy. This webinar will discuss the recently revised Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice. The presentation will include a brief description of changes as compared to the 2011 Standards, an overview of the methodology used to develop the Standards, and the presentation of selected standards with new or changed recommendations.

    Overview: As the recognized global authority in infusion therapy, INS is committed to advancing the specialty through evidence-based practice and research. A major component of that commitment is the development of standards of practice for all clinicians involved in infusion therapy. This webinar will discuss the recently revised Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice. The presentation will include a brief description of changes as compared to the 2011 Standards, an overview of the methodology used to develop the Standards, and the presentation of selected standards with new or changed recommendations.

    Lisa A. Gorski, RN, MS, HHCNS,BC, CRNI®, FAAN

    Clinical nurse specialist, Wheaton Franciscan Home Health & Hospice

    Lisa Gorski has worked for more than 30 years as a Clinical Nurse Specialist (CNS) for Wheaton Franciscan Home Health & Hospice in Milwaukee, Wisconsin. She received her bachelor's and master's degrees from the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee College of Nursing. She is the author of over 50 journal articles and has authored 3 books on the topic of home infusion therapy. She is the co-author of the 2014 Manual of IV Therapeutics. She was an editor for INS' 2010 textbook, Infusion Nursing: An Evidence-Based Approach and the 4th edition of the Core Curriculum for Infusion Nursing. She served as the 2007-2008 INS President, and was chair of the 2011 and 2016 INS Standards of Practice Committee. In 2006, she was inducted as a Fellow into the American Academy of Nursing.

    CRNI® Recerts: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit

    Contact Hours/CE Credit: This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours

  • Infusion of Intravenous Immunoglobulin: Considerations for the Home Care Nurse

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Recorded On: 12/15/2015

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is used to treat an increasing number of autoimmune and inflammatory conditions, as well as various idiopathic diseases. Derived from human plasma, IVIG is similar to blood products, and its administration requires accurate assessment and monitoring of the patient before, during, and after the infusion. This webinar identifies clinical indications for the use of IVIG, identification of various immunoglobulin (IgG) formulations, pre- and postinfusion guidelines, adverse reactions, and appropriate nursing interventions.

    Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) is used to treat an increasing number of autoimmune and inflammatory conditions, as well as various idiopathic diseases. Derived from human plasma, IVIG is similar to blood products, and its administration requires accurate assessment and monitoring of the patient before, during, and after the infusion. This webinar identifies clinical indications for the use of IVIG, identification of various immunoglobulin (IgG) formulations, pre- and postinfusion guidelines, adverse reactions, and appropriate nursing interventions.

    Ginny Strootman, DNP, RN, CRNI®, IgCN

    Director of Nursing Education, Infusion Nurses Society

    Ginny is currently the Director of Nursing Education for the Infusion Nurses Society (INS). Her previous roles have included positions as a nurse manager and general manager for several home infusion companies as well as overseeing nursing operations and nursing education for several biotech companies. Ginny has been a speaker at national INS meetings and has coauthored an article in Nurse Practice Management along with editing several chapters, related to infusion therapy, for Perry, Potter and Ostendorf in Nursing Interventions and Clinical Skills. She has served as the Chair of the RN Council for the Infusion Nurses Certification Corporation (INCC) and assisted in development of the Immunoglobulin Standards of Practice and IgCN certification examination.

    Ginny holds a Doctorate of Nursing Practice degree from Capella University and Masters Degree in Nursing Education from Neumann University. Additionally she has obtained her CRNI® and IgCN certifications.

    Contact Hours/CE Credit: This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours

    CRNI® Recerts: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit

  • Consequences of Central Venous Catheterization: Identification, Discussion and Methods for Reduction of Common CVC and PICC Complications

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Recorded On: 04/08/2015

    Developed through a continuing nursing education grant from Teleflex, Inc.

    Central venous catheterization is a common procedure performed in hospital settings and has increased dramatically over the last 15 years since the introduction of the PICC. The use of central venous catheters can be associated with both positive and negative experiences. PICC's as well have serious consequences despite their ease of placement and presumed innocuous risks. This presentation will review the most common complications associated with the presence of a CVC or PICC and describe any interconnection between them. Methods for reduction of these complications will be reviewed. A brief overview of financial ramifications associated with recently implemented healthcare reform will be discussed as well.

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    Developed through a continuing nursing education grant from Teleflex, Inc.

    Central venous catheterization is a common procedure performed in hospital settings and has increased dramatically over the last 15 years since the introduction of the PICC. The use of central venous catheters can be associated with both positive and negative experiences. PICC's as well have serious consequences despite their ease of placement and presumed innocuous risks. This presentation will review the most common complications associated with the presence of a CVC or PICC and describe any interconnection between them. Methods for reduction of these complications will be reviewed. A brief overview of financial ramifications associated with recently implemented healthcare reform will be discussed as well.

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    Cheryl Kelley

    RN, BSN, VA-BC

    Cheryl is a nationally recognized nurse educator/consultant who focuses in vascular access. An expert in central and peripheral venous access, she has extensive experience in both clinical and manufacturing arenas. Cheryl began her vascular access career at West Virginia University in the mid 90's and then as a clinical and marketing specialist for a leading medical device company. She now consults for medical device companies who have vascular access or infusion therapy needs.

    This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours
    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: April 8, 2017

    This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit
    There is no expiration date for receipt of CRNI® recertification unit

  • Patient Safety and Infusion Management: Rethinking the Role of Filtration

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Recorded On: 11/04/2014

    With the critical need to ensure safe and proper administration of infusion therapy, it is more important than ever to assess the role filtration can play in reducing the risks associated with particle and bacterial contamination, and drug incompatibility reactions. This timely webinar will present scientific evidence of how intravenous (IV) filtration can be used as a preventive strategy to reduce infusion therapy-related complication rate.

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    With the critical need to ensure safe and proper administration of infusion therapy, it is more important than ever to assess the role filtration can play in reducing the risks associated with particle and bacterial contamination, and drug incompatibility reactions. This timely webinar will present scientific evidence of how intravenous (IV) filtration can be used as a preventive strategy to reduce infusion therapy-related complication rate.

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    Marcia Ryder

    PhD, MS, RN

    Marcia Ryder's extensive experience in nursing includes positions as Clinical Director of a Special Care Unit and a Cardiovascular/Thoracic Unit, Clinical Nurse Specialist in Nutrition Support, and Director of Nursing in Home Infusion. Dr. Ryder received her nursing diploma from the Western Pennsylvania Hospital School of Nursing in Pittsburgh, Pa. and her Bachelor's, Master's (critical care nurse specialist), and Doctoral degrees from the University of California, San Francisco. Dr. Ryder is currently an independent collaborative researcher and consultant in medical biofilm/healthcare related infections. She is a nationally and internationally recognized expert in the use and management of vascular access devices. She has served as past-president of the Association for Vascular Access (AVA), past chair of APIC's Scientific Research Council and a former member of the FDA's Central Venous Catheter Working Group. Dr. Ryder was honored as the recipient of the “2007 Educator of the Year" awarded by Infection Control Today.

    Thomas Jack, MD

    Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) of the Hannover Medical School

    Dr. Thomas Jack graduated from Phillips University Marburg in 1998 and the Hannover Medical School in 2002. Before his career in Pediatrics, he worked in the research department of CYTONET, a biotechnological company associated with the Hannover Medical School. His focus was the development of new molecular genetics-based diagnostic kits for different infections. In 2005, he obtained his MD and joined the Department of Pediatric Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine at the Hannover Medical School in 2003. In 2012 he began work as a consultant pediatric intensivist for the Pediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU) of the Hannover Medical School. His major field of clinical research is the management of infusion therapy, patient safety in the PICU, and inflammation/coagulation of critically ill children. He has published several articles in the field of IV therapy and in-line filtration. He published his first clinical study in 2012, which proved the positive benefits of in-line filtration on the outcome of intensive care patients. Together with the members of the working group for infusion management at the Hannover Medical School, he led the development of a new workshop concept for infusion management on the ICU/PICU.

    This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours
    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: November 4, 2016

    This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit
    There is no expiration date for receipt of CRNI® recertification unit

  • Think Safety, Insert Safely: Recommendations for Improving Safety Practices with Short Peripheral Catheters

    Contains 3 Component(s), 0.80 credits offered Recorded On: 02/04/2014

    As the commonly inserted vascular access device in all healthcare settings, the short peripheral catheter (SPC) is viewed as a simple treatment procedure any healthcare practitioners should be able to perform. Yet, the SPC is associated with complications, increased risks of blood occupational exposure and reports of increased lawsuits. This webinar is designed to identify, promote and discuss the INS SPC Safety Task Force's recommendations for improving safety practices with SPCs.

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    As the commonly inserted vascular access device in all healthcare settings, the short peripheral catheter (SPC) is viewed as a simple treatment procedure any healthcare practitioners should be able to perform. Yet, the SPC is associated with complications, increased risks of blood occupational exposure and reports of increased lawsuits. This webinar is designed to identify, promote and discuss the INS SPC Safety Task Force's recommendations for improving safety practices with SPCs.

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    Cora Vizcarra

    RN, MBA, CRNI®, VA-BC

    Cora Vizcarra is an infusion nurse consultant and founder/president of a privately owned healthcare consulting and education corporation. She has more than 25 years of healthcare experience in both the hospital and alternate healthcare settings. She is experienced in insertion and management of various vascular access devices as well as administration of intravenous medications. She holds certifications in infusion therapy (CRNI®) and vascular access (VA-BC). She is actively involved in many professional medical and nursing organizations and was the President of the Infusion Nurses Society in 2008-2009. She has authored numerous articles and chapters in infusion nursing textbooks and other healthcare professional journals.

    This session has been approved for 0.8 contact hours

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: January 25, 2017

    This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit

    There is no expiration date for receipt of CRNI® recertification units.

  • Treatment Options for Gout: An Overview for Infusion and Rheumatology Nurses

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 05/03/2011

    Within the past 18 months, there have been several new medications approved for gout. Education for nurses on gout, its diagnosis, risk factors, and current treatment is paramount given the increasing prevalence. Areas to be addressed include risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Of particular interest will be medications used to treat gout, their administration (PO and infusion), safety profile, onset of action, side effects, and indications for use.

    Developed in conjunction with the Rheumatology Nurses Society (RNS) and presented by Victoria Ruffing, RN, Nurse Manager, Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center, this program will focus on the roles of the infusion and rheumatology nursing communities in the treatment of gout.

    The webinar is sponsored by Savient Pharmaceuticals and is free to all INS and RNS members.

    Don't delay in registering for this very important and informative program.

    Register Now.

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    Within the past 18 months, there have been several new medications approved for gout. Education for nurses on gout, its diagnosis, risk factors, and current treatment is paramount given the increasing prevalence. Areas to be addressed include risk factors, diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Of particular interest will be medications used to treat gout, their administration (PO and infusion), safety profile, onset of action, side effects, and indications for use.

    Developed in conjunction with the Rheumatology Nurses Society (RNS) and presented by Victoria Ruffing, RN, Nurse Manager, Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center, this program will focus on the roles of the infusion and rheumatology nursing communities in the treatment of gout.

    The webinar is sponsored by Savient Pharmaceuticals and is free to all INS and RNS members.

    Don't delay in registering for this very important and informative program.

    Register Now.

    image

    Victoria Ruffing, RN

    Nurse Manager, Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center

    Victoria Ruffing, RN, Nurse Manager, Johns Hopkins Arthritis Center

    This session has not been approved for contact hours

    This session has not been approved for recertification units