INS webinars deliver the most current infusion-related topics in a 60-minute presenter-led session. Each webinar is delivered live and then archived for on-demand viewing. All webinars are free to INS members.

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  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 12/15/2021 at 1:00 PM (EST)

    For more than a century, vaccines have been a main factor in improving overall health and contributing to longer lifespans. However, over past few decades, people have become more reluctant to take vaccines, and this hesitancy has increased in regard to COVID-19 vaccines. How do we remain positive in a world of vaccine hesitancy? Through discussion and role-play, this session will review some factors that have led people to be vaccine hesitant and recommend how infusion nurses might discuss the COVID-19 vaccines with coworkers and patients.

    For more than a century, vaccines have been a main factor in improving overall health and contributing to longer lifespans. However, over past few decades, people have become more reluctant to take vaccines, and this hesitancy has increased in regard to COVID-19 vaccines. How do we remain positive in a world of vaccine hesitancy? Through discussion and role-play, this session will review some factors that have led people to be vaccine hesitant and recommend how infusion nurses might discuss the COVID-19 vaccines with coworkers and patients.

    Learning Objectives:  At the conclusion of this presentation, learners will be able to:

    1.     Verbalize factors that have contributed to hesitancy.

    2.     Identify steps in addressing vaccination status.

    3.     Promote positive vaccine messages.

    4.     Identify vaccine resources that the patient will accept as credible.

    5.     Ensure all staff are on board with promoting positive vaccine messages.

    Sheryl Buckner PhD, RN, ANEF

    University of Oklahoma (OU) College of Nursing

    Dr. Sheryl Buckner, a fellow in the Academy of Nursing Education for her work in Oklahoma Medical Reserve Corps and the Nursing Initiative Promoting Immunization Training, teaches at the University of Oklahoma (OU) College of Nursing, specializing in education, technology, and interprofessional collaboration. Since 2015, she has served as a National Advisory member, working with APTR, CDC, and AACN in developing Immunization Resources for Undergraduate Nursing. She has been a member of OU Interprofessional Educators and Practitioners Association (IEPA) since 2017, and in 2021, Dr. Buckner was part of a team awarded OU IEPA Team of the Year for their interprofessional work.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: December 15, 2024

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Includes a Live Web Event on 12/01/2021 at 1:00 PM (EST)

    Unsafe syringe practices when administering intravenous (IV) medications can cause patient harm and impact clinician practice. The need to prepare and manipulate IV medications at the patient’s bedside can increase the chance for patient infections, disrupt nursing workflow and efficiency, and increase the chance for medication errors. Complexities involved with the care of patients isolated with COVID-19 add to the risks and impact of unsafe syringe practices and amplifies system inefficiencies. Several professional organizations, including but not limited to the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP), INS, and the Joint Commission, recommend ready-to-administer (RTA) IV medications aimed to reduce the risks involved with unsafe syringe practices. This session will provide a review of unsafe syringe practices, the impact of practice changes resulting from COVID-19, and how to integrate ready-to-use IV medications into current practice.

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    Unsafe syringe practices when administering intravenous (IV) medications can cause patient harm and impact clinician practice. The need to prepare and manipulate IV medications at the patient’s bedside can increase the chance for patient infections, disrupt nursing workflow and efficiency, and increase the chance for medication errors. Complexities involved with the care of patients isolated with COVID-19 add to the risks and impact of unsafe syringe practices and amplifies system inefficiencies. Several professional organizations, including but not limited to the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP), INS, and the Joint Commission, recommend ready-to-administer (RTA) IV medications aimed to reduce the risks involved with unsafe syringe practices. This session will provide a review of unsafe syringe practices, the impact of practice changes resulting from COVID-19, and how to integrate ready-to-use IV medications into current practice.

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this webinar, learners will be able to:

    ·       Describe unsafe syringe practices, including but not limited to improper use of cartridges, unnecessary dilution, mislabeling, and bedside compounding

    ·       Explore changes in practice resulting from COVID-19 and how to minimize patient/clinician risk

    ·       Verbalize the benefits of RTA IV medications and other methods to increase efficiency and how to integrate them into practice

    Judith Jacobi, Pharm.D, FCCP, MCCM, BCCCP

    Senior Consultant

    Visante

    Dr. Jacobi, a critical care clinical pharmacy specialist with 38 years of experience at the bedside, is now a senior consultant with Visante, a pharmacy consulting company. Through her role in the Voices of Vascular educational programming, she hopes to improve the safety of intravascular devices and medication administration. She has a broad publication record in critical care and has been active in many professional organizations.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: December 1, 2024

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 11/17/2021

    Phlebitis is often a significant complication of vascular access and infusion therapy. This inflammatory process of the vein may be accompanied by pain and tenderness, erythema, edema, purulence, and palpable venous cord. Clinicians must be able to assess for and identify signs and symptoms of phlebitis and take appropriate measures to mitigate complications. In this webinar, attendees will learn about the pathology of phlebitis and the inherent risks for this complication and gain an understanding of how this is addressed in the 2021 Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice and current literature.

    Phlebitis is often a significant complication of vascular access and infusion therapy. This inflammatory process of the vein may be accompanied by pain and tenderness, erythema, edema, purulence, and palpable venous cord. Clinicians must be able to assess for and identify signs and symptoms of phlebitis and take appropriate measures to mitigate complications. In this webinar, attendees will learn about the pathology of phlebitis and the inherent risks for this complication and gain an understanding of how this is addressed in the 2021 Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice and current literature.

     Learning objectives:  At the conclusion of this presentation, learners will be able to:

    A.  Define phlebitis and its varying etiologies (chemical, mechanical, infectious, or post-infusion)

    B.  Recognize the signs and symptoms of phlebitis and rate it using a standard scale or definition

    C.  Review current literature surrounding phlebitis

    D.  Discuss data collection and quality improvement strategies for phlebitis 

    ​Michelle DeVries, BS, MPH, CIC, VA-BC

    Senior Infection Control Officer

    Methodist Hospitals

    Michelle DeVries has been involved in infection prevention and hospital epidemiology for over 25 years, with a career spanning community, university, and federal health care systems. With a background in hospital and molecular epidemiology, her focus has been at the intersection of vascular access, patient safety, and infection prevention. She was a reviewer for the 2016 and 2021 Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice, wrote the chapter “Prevention of Intravascular Device-Associated Infections” for the International Federation of Infection Control’s Basic Concepts of Infection Control textbook, contributed two chapters to the Vessel Health and Preservation textbook, and has peer-reviewed for numerous publications. She is a former director with Vascular Access Certification Corporation Board, is currently on her local as well as national AVA Board, and is an adjunct research fellow with AVATAR.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: November 17, 2024

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 10/20/2021

    The passing of a loved one is often wrought with emotions for family and friends. Providing artificial nutrition is often more for the family than for the dying patient. Medical ethics, legal precedent, and case law address the withholding or termination of artificial nutrition and hydration to honor the patient’s wishes and to allow them to die proudly when it is no longer possible to live proudly in accordance with their cultural and/or religious beliefs. This session will discuss the difference between prolonging life versus prolonging death and provide guidance for ethical decision making regarding artificial nutrition and hydration.

    The passing of a loved one is often wrought with emotions for family and friends. Providing artificial nutrition is often more for the family than for the dying patient. Medical ethics, legal precedent, and case law address the withholding or termination of artificial nutrition and hydration to honor the patient’s wishes and to allow them to die proudly when it is no longer possible to live proudly in accordance with their cultural and/or religious beliefs. This session will discuss the difference between prolonging life versus prolonging death and provide guidance for ethical decision making regarding artificial nutrition and hydration.

    Learning Objectives:

    At the end of this presentation, the participant will be able to:

    A.  Define medical ethics/bioethics.

    B.  Discuss legal precedent and case law regarding withdrawing or withholding artificial nutrition and hydration (ANH).

    C.  Review the physiology of starvation and dehydration at end of life.

    D. Cite examples of specific cultural and religious considerations related to ANH.

    E.  Identify an ethical framework to guide decision making/discussions related to ANH at end of life.

    Felicia Schaps, MSN-Ed, RN, CRNI®, OCN®, CNSC, lgCN, VA-BC

    Felicia Schaps has been a nurse for over 35 years with the majority of her experience in home infusion. She has been a field nurse, a nurse manager, a VP of nursing, and a branch general manager. Felicia holds a master’s degree in nursing with a focus in education, and also has board certifications in infusion nursing, oncology nursing, nutrition, immunoglobulin nursing, and vascular access. 

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: October 20, 2024

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 09/22/2021

    This presentation will address the complexities of infusing parenteral nutrition and biosimilars. We will discuss the key elements of the 2021 INS Standards of Practice for safe infusion of parenteral nutrition and the development and FDA approval of biosimilars including the pegfilgrastim biosimilar products for oncology supportive care.

    Medical Education Grant: Fresenius Kabi

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    Infusion nurses are considered experts in caring for patients receiving high-risk intravenous therapies such as chemotherapy and parenteral nutrition (PN). Due to the invasive nature and risks associated with infusion therapy, developing protocols with clear direction to support evidence-based clinical practice is critical to ensure that these complex therapies are safely administered. Involvement of infection prevention strategies while managing various infusion pump setups with different IV lines and filters make administration of PN even more complex. This presentation will further address the key elements of the 2021 INS Standards of Practice for safe infusion of complex parenteral nutrition therapies to achieve optimal patient outcomes. FDA–approved biological products provide a pathway to provide more treatment options and increase access to lifesaving medications. During the second half of this webinar, we will discuss the reasons for biosimilars, the FDA approval process, and the key comparative elements of biosimilars versus innovator products. In particular, the presentation will focus on the pegfilgrastim biosimilar products to enhance confidence in and understanding of their efficacy and suitability for oncology patients.  

    Learning Objectives:  At the conclusion of this presentation, learners will be able to:

    ·       Discuss updates and key elements of the 2021 INS Standards of Practice pertaining to parenteral nutrition including infection prevention and discontinuing/restarting parenteral nutrition

    ·       Determine PN administration considerations for various infusion setups such as administration sets, pump setups, and filters

    ·       Identify safe PN formulations

    ·       Define biosimilars and describe their development and FDA approval to educate your patients

    ·       Recognize pegfilgrastim biosimilars considerations in oncology supportive care for prevention of infection manifested by febrile neutropenia

    Margaret McGuinness, PharmD, BCOP

    Director of Pharmacy and Research Services

    Compass Oncology

    Margaret McGuinness is currently the director of pharmacy and research services at Compass Oncology, where she has practiced for almost 20 years. She previously worked in academia and oncology practice at the Portland VA and Oregon State University. In the past 2 years, she has led introduction and integration of biosimilars into practice. She has more than 30 years of oncology clinical practice, pharmacy and health care leadership and strategy through professional work, and experience in professional organizations including president of state and local organizations. She has had academic and clinical training and practice in the United States, New Zealand, Australia, and Great Britain.

    Saralynn Tuttle, PharmD

    Pharmacy Operations Coordinator

    Broward Health Coral Spring

    Saralynn Tuttle is a graduate of Nova Southeastern University with a doctorate of pharmacy. She has over 20 years of experience as a clinical pharmacist. The majority of her career was dedicated to the clinical monitoring and management of parenteral nutrition in the neonatal population at the Salah Foundation Children's Hospital. In 2014, she accepted a leadership role as the clinical coordinator of pediatric pharmacy services, and in 2018, she accepted the role of the medication safety and quality coordinator for the Joe DiMaggio Children's Hospital. She currently works as the pharmacy operations coordinator at Broward Health Coral Springs.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: September 22, 2024

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.