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  • Episode 29: November 7, 2018 - Inspiring Nursing Scholarship: INS’ Gardner Foundation Scholarships

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    The Infusion Nurses Society (INS) established the Gardner Foundation to provide scholarships for INS members who are dedicated to advancing the delivery of quality infusion therapy, enhancing the specialty through stringent standards of practice and professional ethics, and promoting research and education in the infusion specialty. INS awards more than $30,000 in scholarships every year and recipients are honored at INS’ Annual Meeting. In this podcast, you will have the opportunity to hear from three 2018 Gardner Foundation scholarship recipients. Learn about the application process, why you should apply, and how your nursing practice will benefit. The call for applications opens January 2019. Watch the INS website and apply!

    The Infusion Nurses Society (INS) established the Gardner Foundation to provide scholarships for INS members who are dedicated to advancing the delivery of quality infusion therapy, enhancing the specialty through stringent standards of practice and professional ethics, and promoting research and education in the infusion specialty. INS awards more than $30,000 in scholarships every year and recipients are honored at INS’ Annual Meeting.  

    In this podcast, you will have the opportunity to hear from three 2018 Gardner Foundation scholarship recipients. Learn about the application process, why you should apply, and how your nursing practice will benefit. 

    The call for applications opens January 2019. Watch the INS website and apply!   

    Guests: 
    Tamara Johnson, BSN, RN, CRNI®
    Patricia D'Angelo, RN, CRNI®
    Cynthia Sumrall, BSN, RN, CRNI®

    The Infusion Nurses Society (INS) established the Gardner Foundation to provide scholarships for INS members who are dedicated to advancing the delivery of quality infusion therapy, enhancing the specialty through stringent standards of practice and professional ethics, and promoting research and education in the infusion specialty. INS awards more than $30,000 in scholarships every year and recipients are honored at INS’ Annual Meeting.  

    In this podcast, you will have the opportunity to hear from three 2018 Gardner Foundation scholarship recipients. Learn about the application process, why you should apply, and how your nursing practice will benefit.

    The call for applications opens January 2019. Watch the INS website and apply!   

    Resource: Gardner Foundation scholarships. Infusion Nurses Society’s website.   http://www.ins1.org/GardnerFoundation/GardnerScholarships.aspx.

  • Burnout in the Workplace: Putting the Me Back in TiMe

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 11/03/2018

    After the session, attendees will be able to apply the techniques described in this session to daily practice and to describe techniques to prevent burnout.

    Nursing burnout is defined as physical, mental, and emotional exhaustion. Over time, it can lead to dulled emotions and disengagement from family, friends, coworkers, and patients. The National Institutes of Health has found that hospitals with a high rate of employee burnout tend to have lower patient satisfaction rates. Burnout also has been linked to increased infection rates. The combination of long shifts, stressful situations, dealing with sickness and death, and putting others first are likely causes of nursing burnout. Why does this happen and how can we fix it? This session will discuss the causes of burnout and how we can stay grounded by taking time for ourselves.

    Learning Outcomes 

    After the session, attendees will be able to apply the techniques described in this session to daily practice and to describe techniques to prevent burnout.

    ​Diane Frndak, PHD, MBA, CAPP

    Robert Morris University

    Diane C. Frndak, PHD, MBA, CAPP, is an assistant professor in the Robert Morris University's health service administration program in its School of Nursing and Health Sciences. She has worked in health care administration, with a focus on organizational excellence, patient safety, and quality. She is especially passionate about helping individuals thrive, in particular health care workers.

    Disclosure: No conflict of interest to disclose

    CRNI® RUs: 2                                                                        
    This entire program has been approved for 2 CRNI® recertification units and meets the INS Meeting criteria.                                                                  
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS National Academy 2018 in Washington, DC are not eligible to receive CRNI® recertification units through this online program.

    Contact Hours: 1       
    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.                                                           
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS National Academy 2018 in Washington, DC are not eligible to receive contact hours through this online program.


    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: November 3, 2021

    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • Does Age Matter? Generational Differences Among Coworkers

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 11/03/2018

    After the session, attendees will be able to listen and learn from peers about how they view their work environments and how they face challenges differently.

    This panel presentation by 3 nurses representing a range of generations will discuss issues that have an impact on their practices in the workplace. Issues may range from bullying, technological differences, and the experience of "novice to expert" as the nurse transitions into other practices. The presentation will cause attendees to consider where they are positioned on the continuum and what their outlook is. Attendees also will learn more about their practices and how others may observe their responses.

    Learning Outcomes 

    After the session, attendees will be able to listen and learn from peers about how they view their work environments and how they face challenges differently.

    ​Mary Bates, MS, BSN, RN

    Penn Home Infusion Therapy

    Mary Bates, MS, BSN, RN, began her career in home infusion as a staff nurse, in 1988. Since that time, she has worked for several organizations in almost every aspect of home infusion nursing, including management, marketing, education, and quality management. Nine years ago, she decided to return to direct patient care. She graduated from a hospital-based diploma program, and obtained a BSN and a master's degree in health care administration while working full time.

    Disclosure: No conflict of interest to disclose

    ​Chloe Littzen, MSN, RN, CPN, AE-C

    University of Arizona

    Chloe Littzen, MSN, RN, CPN, AE-C, is a second-year PhD student at the University of Arizona, with a major focus on systems and a minor in integrative health. Her research is centered around the effects of generational marginalization on young-adult nurses' well-being. Currently a graduate research assistant at the University of Arizona, Ms. Littzen also sits on the board of the Arizona Foundation for the Future of Nursing.

    Disclosure: No conflict of interest to disclose

    Florence Rigney, RN

    Tacoma General Hospital

    Florence, known as See See, graduated from the Tacoma General Hospital School of Nursing in 1946. Although she began her career in pediatrics when penicillin was first being used, she has worked in the operating room for most of the past 72 years. She says she tried to retire at 67, but her “retirement” lasted only 6 months. Today, at 92 years young, See See continues to work in Tacoma General’s operating room 2 days a week, because, she says, she enjoys working, having patient contact, and providing comfort to patients. As evidenced by this recent profile on NBC News, See See has been known to run circles around nurses half her age!

    Disclosure: No conflict of interest to disclose

    ​Theresa Stapleton, BSN, RN, CRNI®

    Novasyte

    Theresa P. Stapleton, BSN, RN, CRNI®, a clinical nurse educator for Novasyte, has been a nurse for 23 years. For the first 13 years of her career, she was a nurse in emergency departments in Ohio, Virginia, Maryland, and Pennsylvania. For the past 10 years, she has been a member of hospital-based teams providing peripheral and peripherally inserted central catheter placements. She has also been an independent contractor. Mrs. Stapleton received her CRNI® certification in 2006. She lives in Knoxville, Tennessee.

    Disclosure: No conflict of interest to disclose

    CRNI® RUs: 2                                                                        
    This entire program has been approved for 2 CRNI® recertification units and meets the INS Meeting criteria.
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS National Academy 2018 in Washington, DC are not eligible to receive CRNI® recertification units through this online program.

    Contact Hours: 1       
    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.                                                           
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS National Academy 2018 in Washington, DC are not eligible to receive contact hours through this online program.


    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: November 3, 2021

    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • To Infuse or Not to Infuse: The Importance of Blood Return

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 11/03/2018

    After the session, attendees will be able to list potential complications related to a lack of blood return from CVADs and discuss appropriate interventions for troubleshooting and resolution.

    The misplacement of central vascular access devices (CVADs) frequently results in the absence of blood return. At times, clinicians are encouraged to use an established CVAD without a blood return to save time and/or to lessen treatment-related stress for patients receiving intravenous (IV) fluids, chemotherapy, or parenteral nutrition, to name a few. This presentation will discuss the rationale for obtaining a blood return before the administration of IV fluids in relation to what contributing factors there may be and whether it's worth the risk.

    Learning Outcomes 

    After the session, attendees will be able to list potential complications related to a lack of blood return from CVADs and discuss appropriate interventions for troubleshooting and resolution.

    ​Denice Gibson, DNP, RN, CRNI®, BMTCN, AOCNS®

    HonorHealth

    Denice Gibson, DNP, RN, CRNI®, BMTCN, AOCNS®, is a clinical nurse specialist for HonorHealth, based in Scottsdale, Arizona. She has been a clinical nurse specialist for more than 20 years on a bone marrow transplantation, a leukemia, and an oncology service line at a community hospital. In addition to working in 3 spheres of patient care, the profession, and the community, she also works with a 5-hospital network to consultant for peripheral and central catheter care and administration. She is government affairs officer for the Arizona Nurses Association and the Oncology Nursing Society's health care policy liaison.

    Disclosure: No conflict of interest to disclose

    CRNI® RUs: 2                                                                       
    This entire program has been approved for 2 CRNI® recertification units and meets the INS Meeting criteria.                                                                 
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS National Academy 2018 in Washington, DC are not eligible to receive CRNI® recertification units through this online program.

    Contact Hours: 1        
    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.                                                           
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS National Academy 2018 in Washington, DC are not eligible to receive contact hours through this online program.


    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: November 3, 2021

    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • LGBTQI: Providing Care for Transgender Persons

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 11/03/2018

    After the session, Infusion nurses will be able to discuss general interprofessional practice guidelines in the care of LGBTQIA patients.

    Improving health care for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer, intersex, and asexual (LGBTQIA) patients starts with nurses understanding the patient's unique and distinct health care needs. With information about terminology, practice guidelines, and the most current research, infusion nurses can provide better care to LGBTQIA patients.

    Learning Outcomes 

    After the session, Infusion nurses will be able to discuss general interprofessional practice guidelines in the care of LGBTQIA patients.

    ​Melissa Harker, MSN, RN-BC

    Hackensack Meridian Health

    Melissa Harker, MSN, RN-BC, is the manager of education and training, integrative health and medicine, for Hackensack Meridian Health. She holds a master’s degree in nursing education and a national certification in gerontology. Currently working on a doctoral degree with a focus on nursing leadership focused on the health care needs of LGBTQIA patients, she also serves as the corporate chairperson for the Pride and Allies Team Member Resource Group at Hackensack Meridian Health and teaches LGBTQIA sensitivity to direct care providers. She is a visiting professor at several universities and a published writer.

    Disclosure: No conflict of interest to disclose

    CRNI® RUs: 2                                                                       
    This entire program has been approved for 2 CRNI® recertification units and meets the INS Meeting criteria.                                                                       
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS National Academy 2018 in Washington, DC are not eligible to receive CRNI® recertification units through this online program.

    Contact Hours: 1       
    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.                                                           
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS National Academy 2018 in Washington, DC are not eligible to receive contact hours through this online program.


    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: November 3, 2021

    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • Sepsis Update: Procalcitonin—Friend or Foe?

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 11/03/2018

    After the session, attendees will be able to discuss how the use of procalcitonin measurements in sepsis and septic shock may improve antibiotic stewardship.

    Because sepsis and septic shock are leading causes of intensive care unit admissions and both carry a high mortality rate, the timely and accurate diagnosis of sepsis is paramount in reducing morbidity and mortality. Procalcitonin (PCT) can be used to detect sepsis earlier in hospitalized patients and guide antibiotic therapy. This presentation will provide updates on the most current sepsis guidelines and describe the use of PCT in diagnosing sepsis and improving antibiotic stewardship by allowing earlier deescalation of antibiotic therapy. At the conclusion of the presentation, attendees will be able to describe the pathophysiology of sepsis and PCT and describe the advantages of using PCT levels in patients with sepsis and septic shock.

    Learning Outcomes 

    After the session, attendees will be able to discuss how the use of procalcitonin measurements in sepsis and septic shock may improve antibiotic stewardship.

    Patrick Laird, DNP, RN, ACNP-BC

    The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston Cizik School of Nursing

    Patrick A. Laird, DNP, RN, ACNP-BC, is an assistant professor and the director of the adult/gerontology acute care nurse practitioner program at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston's Cizik School of Nursing. He has been certified as an adult acute care nurse practitioner by the American Nurses Credentialing Center since 2005. In addition to teaching, he continues to work as a nurse practitioner in pulmonary/critical care.

    Disclosure: No conflict of interest to disclose

    CRNI® RUs: 2                                                                       
    This entire program has been approved for 2 CRNI® recertification units and meets the INS Meeting criteria.
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS National Academy 2018 in Washington, DC are not eligible to receive CRNI® recertification units through this online program.

    Contact Hours: 1       
    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.                                                           
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS National Academy 2018 in Washington, DC are not eligible to receive contact hours through this online program.


    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: November 3, 2021

    INS is accredited as a provider of continuing nursing education by the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s Commission on Accreditation.

  • Virtual Conference: Culture of Collaboration in Infusion Therapy

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 11/02/2018

    Nurses are in the “bull’s eye” of the health care paradigm that is the “triple aim” of transformative changes in health care: improved patient satisfaction, improved outcomes, and reduction of health care costs. The transition of infusion therapy between care units and departments in the acute care setting may also need to continue to settings outside of hospital walls including home care, ambulatory care, and long-term care. The unique skill set of the infusion nurse ensures that patients and families requiring continued infusion therapy, are connected to resources that enable successful navigation through a complex system. This entire program has been approved for 5 contact hours and 10 CRNI® RUs and meets the INS Meeting criteria.

    CULTURE OF COLLABORATION IN INFUSION THERAPY

    Nurses are in the “bull’s eye” of the health care paradigm that is the “triple aim” of transformative changes in health care: improved patient satisfaction, improved outcomes, and reduction of health care costs. The transition of infusion therapy between care units and departments in the acute care setting may also need to continue to settings outside of hospital walls including home care, ambulatory care, and long-term care. The unique skill set of the infusion nurse ensures that patients and families requiring continued infusion therapy, are connected to resources that enable successful navigation through a complex system.

    Sponsored by: image

    Defining the Course: Care Coordination

    9:00 - 10:00 AM EST
    • Nurses play an important role in ensuring that patient care is coordinated across the care continuum
    • Collaboration and high-performance teamwork is critical
    • National call for care coordination will be examined

    Building a Culture of Safety: It Starts with Me

    10:00 - 11:00 AM EST
    • The history and state of preventable medical harm will be explored
    • Effect of hierarchal structure of patient care will be discussed
    • A case study to troubleshoot real-life solutions will be presented 

    It Happens Across the Lines: A Patient-Entered Approach

    11:00 AM - 12:00 PM EST
    • Overview of weaknesses and strengths encountered by the care coordination team
    • Patient case study that illustrates challenges in transitioning from acute to home care setting
    • Highlighting positive outcomes and developmental areas

    Having a Voice in Your Treatment

    1:30 - 2:30 PM EST
    • Treatment team is responsible for providing patient with risks and benefits
    • Patient-centered care requires the placement of the patient at the center of treatment decisions
    • Nurses must facilitate communication between the treatment team and the patient

    When Nurses Collaborate: Tactical Communication Skills

    2:30 - 3:30 PM EST
    • Session will begin with the Arudia Win-Win Conversation Model
    • Presentation of C-Suite best practices and tips to improve leadership, management, and collaborative skills 
    • Getting to the heart of challenges in ways that leave patients, family members, caregivers, and colleagues feeling respected and valued
    Contact Hours

    This entire program has been approved for 5 contact hours. Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: November 2, 2021

    CRNI® Recertifications Units

    This entire program has been approved for 10 CRNI® recertification units and meets the INS Meeting criteria.
    *Note: Participants who attend the live version of this program at the 2018 National Academy in Washington, D.C. are not eligible to receive contact hours or CRNI® recertification units through this online program.

    Sessions for this One Day Program will allow attendees to explore and expand their knowledge, attitudes, and skills. This will enable them to establish strong, secure, and collaborative connections in the ever-changing health care environment.

    Defining the Course: Care Coordination

    Gerri Lamb, PhD, RN, FAAN

    9:00 – 10:00 AM EST

    Infusion nurses play an important role in helping ensure that care for patients is coordinated across the care continuum. As pivotal members of the interprofessional team, infusion nurses possess professional expertise and relationships with patients and families which are essential to care coordination outcomes. The extent to which these strengths are translated into meaningful contributions for quality and value relies heavily on collaboration and high-performance teamwork. In this presentation, the national call for care coordination and teamwork, as well as the implications for infusion nurses, are examined. Finally, how infusion nurses can take immediate action through teamwork and care coordination to improve the quality and value of health care for patients and families will be explored..

    Learning Outcomes: After the session, attendees will be able to list key issues and barriers to advancing care coordination for patients with complex chronic illnesses; examine how interprofessional team performance contributes to care coordination outcomes; and identify 3 actions infusion nurses can take to improve teamwork and care coordination.


    Building a Culture of Safety: It Starts With Me

    Cheri Constantino-Shor, MSN, RN, CRNI®, CMSRN
    10:00 - 11:00 AM EST

    This session will explore the history and contemporary state of preventable medical harm in the United States and the impact a lack of teamwork has on patient outcomes. It also will discuss the reality of the effect of the hierarchical structure of patient care and explore the changing landscape of health care and how a focus on quality has had an impact on our everyday work. A case study will help troubleshoot real-life solutions for everyday infusion challenges and will address communication barriers and strategies, while encouraging attendees to identify specific steps that can be taken to hold personal accountability for contributing to a culture of safety.

    Learning Outcomes: After the session, attendees will be able to correlate how working together can improve patient outcomes; describe 3 barriers to working together as a collaborative health care team; and discuss ways in which health care workers can function better as an efficient, interdisciplinary team.


    It Happens Across the Lines: A Patient-Centered Approach

    Daniel Heaton, PharmD, RPh
    11:00 AM - 12:00 PM EST

    This presentation will provide an overview of the weaknesses and strengths the care coordination team encounters during patient transitions of care—from inpatient to outpatient settings—for patients needing continued infusion therapy at home. Attendees will be led through a patient case study that Illustrates the challenges involved in transitioning from an acute to a home care setting. Through the case study, examples of positive outcomes and developmental areas will be highlighted, with an emphasis on how to improve communication and collaboration to provide the best possible patient care and outcomes. 

    Learning Outcomes: After the session, attendees will be able to identify barriers that are encountered during transition from inpatient to outpatient settings; describe areas that require collaboration and clarification when a patient is transitioned to infusion therapy at home or in an outpatient setting; identify communication barriers that occur between nurses and pharmacists when treating patients in a home care setting; and discuss ways in which health care professionals can collaborate to help ensure best outcomes and maximize patient comfort during difficult transitions.


    Having a Voice in Your Treatment

    Donna Wilson, MSN, RN, CBCN
    1:30 - 2:30 PM EST

    When defining treatment goals, the responsibility of the treatment team is to provide the patient with information on expected outcomes, as well as the risks and benefits of the treatment plan. Perceptions of treatment goals may differ between the treatment team and the patient. To ensure a patient’s treatment preferences are honored, shared decision-making must be person-centered and well informed. Patient-centered care requires the treatment team to place the patient at the center of treatment decisions by identifying and respecting the patient’s preferences, values, cultural traditions, and socioeconomic conditions. Nurses are in a unique position to facilitate communication between the treatment team and the patient concerning treatment options and to assist in coordinated and collaborative care, focusing not only on the physical comfort of the patient, but also on his or her emotional well-being.

    Learning Outcomes: After the session, attendees will be able to (1) identify possible differences in the perceptions of treatment goals between patients, caregivers, and clinicians; (2) describe the role of the registered nurse in collaborating on treatment decisions as a member of the treatment team; and (3) define techniques to maintain therapeutic communication between the treatment team and the patient.


    When Nurses Collaborate: Tactical Communication Skills

    Anne Collier, MPP, JD, PCC
    Cynthia Shaffer, MS, MBA, ACC
    2:30 - 3:30 PM EST

    Patient care, patient and staff safety, effective interprofessional teamwork, and staff well-being all depend on effective collaboration. Attendees will learn C-Suite best practices and tips that will noticeably improve their leadership, management, and collaborative skills. In this interactive session, we will build your collaboration skills and overall tactical communication competencies, arming you with what you need to be more effective. The session begins with the Arudia Win-Win Conversation Model, which is built on a problem-solving, rather than blame-focused, foundation. Attendees will learn how to get to the heart of the challenge in a way that leaves patients, family members, caregivers, and colleagues feeling respected and valued. Attendees will also learn the Arudia Coaching Model, the tool of choice when it comes to engaging and empowering others. When combined, these tools will help you to develop solutions that take into consideration all those affected by the outcome.

    Learning Outcomes: After the session, attendees will be able to describe ways to apply the Arudia Win-Win Conversation Model for better collaboration and patient outcomes; verbalize ways to leverage the Arudia Coaching Model to engage and gain buy-in from patients and colleagues; and acknowledge they are more confident in difficult conversations with everyone—from the patient to the provider.


    Contact Hours

    This entire program has been approved for 5 contact hours. Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: November 2, 2021

    CRNI® Recertification Units

    This entire program has been approved for 10 CRNI® recertification units and meets the INS Meeting criteria.

    *Note: Participants who attend the live version of this program at the 2018 National Academy in Washington, D.C. are not eligible to receive contact hours or CRNI® recertification units through this online program.

    Gerri Lamb, PhD, RN, FAAN

    Arizona State University

    Gerri Lamb, PhD, RN, FAAN, is a professor and director of Arizona State University’s Center for Advancing Interprofessional Practice, Education, and Research. A past chair of the American Interprofessional Health Collaborative and a convener of the Arizona Nexus Innovations Network, Dr. Lamb has served as an expert consultant for many professional organizations, including the National Committee for Quality Assurance and the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality.


    No conflict of interest to disclose

    Cheri Constantino-Shor, MSN, RN, CRNI®, CMSRN

    Virginia Mason Medical Center

    Cheri Constantino-Shor, MSN, RN, CRNI®, CMSRN, is the director of clinical practice and professional development at Virginia Mason Medical Center. With more than 24 years of nursing experience, she has spoken nationally about her passion for creating a healthy work environment in health care. She is 1 of 5 nurses in the country appointed to the Academy of Medical-Surgical Nurses’ Healthy Practice Environment National Task Force.


    No conflict of interest to disclose

    Daniel Heaton, PharmD, RPh

    Intermountain Healthcare

    Daniel E Heaton, PharmD, RPh, is a clinical pharmacist with Intermountain Homecare and Hospice, specializing in total parenteral nutrition, chemotherapy, and intravenous antibiotic therapy. Dr. Heaton has 15 years' experience with home infusions and collaborating with pharmacists, nurses, and doctors to create positive outcomes. He completed a training and certificate program for home infusions through the National Home Infusion Association.


    No conflict of interest to disclose

    Donna Wilson, MSN, RN, CBCN

    Massey Cancer Center at Virginia Commonwealth University

    Donna M. Wilson, MSN, RN, CBCN, a certified breast care nurse, cares for oncology patients in the inpatient setting and is a patient nurse navigator in breast health at the Virginia Commonwealth University Massey Cancer Center's clinic. As a navigator, she advocates for, educates, and assists cancer patients throughout their treatment.


    No conflict of interest to disclose

    Anne Collier, MPP, JD, PCC

    Arudia

    Anne E. Collier, MPP, JD, PCC, is the founder and chief executive officer of Arudia, an organization dedicated to improving culture, collaboration, and communication. In 2004, after 11 years of practicing law, she began working with organizations to help improve leadership and collaborative skills. The author of "The Workplace Toolkit—Actionable Approaches to People Problems," she has developed the Arudia System, which helps alter organizations through a combination of executive coaching, in-person workshops, webinar teleclasses, and online learning.


    No conflict of interest to disclose

    Cynthia Shaffer, MS, MBA, ACC

    Arudia

    Cynthia Shaffer, MS, MBA, ACC, is practice group chair in health care at Arudia. She has 20 years’ experience in executive and management roles in health care and life sciences, including 10 years in an academic medical center. An associate certified coach through the International Coach Federation, she is a Myers Briggs Type Indicator certified practitioner, and is qualified to administer the Actualized Leader Profile and the Group Culture Profile.


    No conflict of interest to disclose

  • Episode 28: October 24, 2018 - Bleeding Disorders

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Bleeding disorders affect thousands of children in the United States, and practitioners face multiple challenges in their management and treatment. Effective nursing care for patients with bleeding disorders requires that nurses understand the pathophysiology of the disease, recognize those who present in crisis, and possess the ability to manage acute complications aggressively. This podcast will provide an overview of bleeding disorders, discuss their diagnosis and management, and will delineate the role of the infusion nurse.

    Bleeding disorders affect thousands of children in the United States, and practitioners face multiple challenges in their management and treatment. Effective nursing care for patients with bleeding disorders requires that nurses understand the pathophysiology of the disease, recognize those who present in crisis, and possess the ability to manage acute complications aggressively. This podcast will provide an overview of bleeding disorders, discuss their diagnosis and management, and will delineate the role of the infusion nurse.

    Ashley Smith, MSN, RN, CRNI®

    Nurse Specialist, Bleeding Disorders

    Ashley Smith, MSN, RN, CRNI®, is a nurse specialist in bleeding disorder therapies at Paragon Healthcare Specialty. Before her career in specialty pharmacy, Mrs. Smith spent many years caring for pediatric and adult patients in the emergency department. She has also worked in cardiology, general medicine, and outpatient surgery. She earned a bachelor’s degree from Jacksonville State University and an MSN in nursing education from the University of North Alabama. She is a member of the Sigma Theta Tau International Honor Society of Nursing, now known as Sigma. 

    Disclosure: This educational activity does not promote this entity or the products thereof. There is no conflict of interest for anyone with the ability to control content for this activity except Ashley Smith, MSN, RN, CRNI® is employed by Paragon Healthcare, Inc., a specialty pharmacy that services hemophilia patients. Conflict of interest resolved.

    Guest: 
    Ashley Smith, MSN, RN, CRNI® 
    Nurse Specialist, Bleeding Disorders

    Bleeding disorders affect thousands of children in the United States, and practitioners face multiple challenges in their management and treatment. Effective nursing care for patients with bleeding disorders requires that nurses understand the pathophysiology of the disease, recognize those who present in crisis, and possess the ability to manage acute complications aggressively. This podcast will provide an overview of bleeding disorders, discuss their diagnosis and management, and will delineate the role of the infusion nurse.

    Resource:
    American Society of Hematology. Bleeding disorders. http://www.hematology.org/Patients/Bleeding.aspx. Accessed October 1, 2018. 


  • The Normalization of Deviance in Health Care Delivery: Insights on Prevention, Learning, and Corrective Action From Organizational Science

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 10/17/2018

    In today’s health care climate, normalized deviation from established standards of practice is the focus of considerable research and practical intervention. It is now widely recognized that medical errors, workarounds, and adverse drug events are often caused by cultural norms and institutionalized patterns of behavior developed over time. Yet despite this recognition, most organizations encounter significant barriers to changing these normative pressures. In this webinar, change management tools and principles from the organizational sciences will be provided to help participants prevent, minimize, and correct the negative consequences of normative deviance.

    In today’s health care climate, normalized deviation from established standards of practice is the focus of considerable research and practical intervention. It is now widely recognized that medical errors, workarounds, and adverse drug events are often caused by cultural norms and institutionalized patterns of behavior developed over time. Yet despite this recognition, most organizations encounter significant barriers to changing these normative pressures. In this webinar, change management tools and principles from the organizational sciences will be provided to help participants prevent, minimize, and correct the negative consequences of normative deviance. 

    Learning Outcomes: At the conclusion of this presentation, participants will be able to:
    • Diagnose problems associated with normative deviance.
    • Gain exposure to contemporary change-management models.
    • Understand basic intervention strategies for overcoming dysfunctional deviance.

    Benjamin Dunford, PhD, MS, BS

    Associate Professor

    Benjamin Dunford, PhD, MS, BS, is an associate professor at the Krannert School of Management of Purdue University. He also has formal academic affiliations with Purdue’s department of psychological sciences and Regenstrief Center for Healthcare Engineering, and with the school of management at Seoul National University in South Korea. Professor Dunford is a recognized teacher at the master’s and executive levels on topics that include negotiation, organizational change, leadership, employee engagement, and conflict management. His research, which has been recognized for excellence, focuses on how management of people has an impact on organizational effectiveness, employee engagement, and safety outcomes, with a special emphasis on the health care industry. The author of more than 25 published peer reviewed journal articles, conference proceedings, and book chapters, Professor Dunford has consulted with numerous firms from a variety of industries, but most extensively in health care. 

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: October 17, 2021

  • Episode 27: October 10, 2018 - Demystifying Gout (Part 3): Complications and Management of Chronic Gout

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Early detection and treatment of gout is significant for reducing the risk of complications. When left untreated, gout can affect other organs and body parts causing irreversible joint damage, joint deformity, loss of mobility or range of motion, bone loss, tophi, kidney stones, chronic kidney disease, or kidney failure. This third and final podcast on demystifying gout will explore options aimed at reducing the incidence of gouty attacks, how to prevent complications, and ways to improve the patient’s quality of life.

    Early detection and treatment of gout is significant for reducing the risk of complications. When left untreated, gout can affect other organs and body parts causing irreversible joint damage, joint deformity, loss of mobility or range of motion, bone loss, tophi, kidney stones, chronic kidney disease, or kidney failure. This third and final podcast on demystifying gout will explore options aimed at reducing the incidence of gouty attacks, how to prevent complications, and ways to improve the patient’s quality of life. 

    Vickie Sayles, BSN, RN-BC, CRNI®

    Clinical Nurse Manager

    Vickie L. Sayles, BSN, RN-BC, CRNI®, is the clinical nurse manager for the department of rheumatic and immunologic diseases at the Cleveland Clinic Foundation in Cleveland, Ohio. She is board-certified in ambulatory nursing, rheumatology nursing, and infusion nursing, and she currently serves as treasurer of the Rheumatology Nurse Society. A presenter at various conferences in the United States, Ms. Sayles has spoken on subjects such as infusion nursing, infusion medications, biologic drugs, and biosimilar drugs.

    Guest:

    Vickie L. Sayles, BSN, RN-BC, CRNI®
    Clinical Nurse Manager, Department of Rheumatic and Immunologic Disease
    Cleveland Clinic Foundation

    Gout is a chronic metabolic disease experienced by approximately 4% of the population of the United States. Gout is caused by the buildup of uric acid crystals in the joints, kidneys, and other body systems, and can be debilitating for patients. Early detection of gout results in significantly fewer complications over time and reduces associated comorbidities. This 3-part case study will discuss the clinical signs and symptoms, identify the triggers associated with attacks, examine various treatment options, and review common complications and prevention.

    Resources:     

    • Borghi C, Perez-Ruiz F. Urate lowering therapies in the treatment of gout: a systematic review and meta-analysis. Eur Rev Med Pharmacol Sci. 2016;20(5):983-992.  https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/27010159.  Accessed September 19, 2018. 
    • Dalbeth N, Stamp LK, Merriman TR. The genetics of gout: towards personalized medicine? BMC Med. 2017;15(1):108. doi: 10.1186/s12916-017-0878-5.
    • Shekelle P, Newberry S, Fitzgerald J, et al. Management of gout: a systematic review in support of an American College of Physicians clinical practice guideline. Ann Intern Med. 2017;166(1):37-51. doi: 10.7326/M16-0461. 
    • Wagler V, Pumerantz A. Management of acute and recurrent gout. Ann Intern Med. 2017;166(10):759. doi: 10.7326/L17-0144.