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  • Virtual Conference: Promoting Vessel Health and Preservation Through Vein Visualization

    Contains 6 Product(s)

    This 2-day virtual program will provide registrants with guidance regarding the use of vascular visualization technology. Expert led sessions will include instruction on how to use this technology to increase vascular access device insertion success, reduce insertion-related complications, develop structured education programs to promote clinician assuredness, and promote successful phlebotomy procedures. Registrants will receive 5 Contact Hours and those holding the CRNI® credential will receive 10 Recertification Units.

    This 2-day virtual program will provide registrants with guidance regarding the use of vascular visualization technology. Expert led sessions will include instruction on how to use this technology to increase vascular access device insertion success, reduce insertion-related complications, develop structured education programs to promote clinician assuredness, and promote successful phlebotomy procedures. Registrants will receive 5 Contact Hours and those holding the CRNI® credential will receive 10 Recertification Units.

  • Episode 75: May 13, 2021 - Sickle Cell Disease My Story – Remembering Kelsey Taylor

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Living with sickle cell anemia: what I wish my caregivers understood about me—Kelsey Taylor, June, 2019.

    Living with sickle cell anemia: what I wish my caregivers understood about me—Kelsey Taylor, June, 2019.

    Kelsey Taylor

    My name is Kelsey Taylor. I’m a 27-year-old graduate of Wheaton College, MA.  I was diagnosed with sickle cell anemia at birth, and since then have been advocating for patients nationwide. While struggling with sickle cell, I had my first pain crisis when I was 5 years old, suffered severe daily pain since age 16, and at 19 I ended up doing a bone marrow transplant in an attempt to cure my disease. I engrafted—meaning new, healthy bone marrow was producing normal cells—but my body rejected the healthy marrow and sickle cell disease returned a month later. Since then, I've focused on advocating and sharing my experience with the disease, including creating a podcast to raise awareness of the patient perspective of not just sickle cell, but many chronic illnesses, diseases, and disabilities.

    Host: Dawn Berndt, DNP, RN, CRNI® – INS Clinical Education & Publications Manager

    Guest: Kelsey Taylor (Recorded June, 2019)

    Sickle cell disease is a family of blood disorders that affects the hemoglobin molecule in red blood cells, and impacts approximately 80 000 individuals in the United States. It’s the most common inherited blood disorder in this country, affecting 1 in 500 African Americans and 1 in 1000-1400 Hispanic Americans. In sickle cell disease, the hemoglobin molecules are atypical and change into a crescent—or sickle—shape. Those living with sickle cell disease often experience episodes of severe pain and suffer the effects of anemia, which causes extreme fatigue, shortness of breath and, in children, delayed growth and development. In adults, serious complications may include pulmonary hypertension, a form of high blood pressure that affects the blood vessels that supply the lung.

    In this session, Kelsey Taylor described her experiences living with the disease and explains how she worked to advocate for those who experience sickle cell and other chronic conditions.      

    Resources:

    1. https://www.sciencemag.org/new...
    2.  https://sponsored.bostonglobe.com/pfizer/dear-scientist-sickle-cell-disease/
    3. https://www.gofundme.com/f/hel...
    4. Sickle Cell Disease Foundation: Sickle Cell Disease Foundation (scdfc.org)

  • Episode 74: May 7, 2021 - Tips and Tricks for Effective Educational Programs

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Whether developing micro-learning capsules, traditional classroom lesson plans, or annual competency reviews, nursing education is designed to share specific information in its most accessible form. Learner engagement is essential to information retention; instruction design is essential to meaningful learning. In this podcast, Marlene Steinheiser and Dawn Berndt, the INS clinical education team shares practical tips for developing department- or organizational-based education programs.

    Whether developing micro-learning capsules, traditional classroom lesson plans, or annual competency reviews, nursing education is designed to share specific information in its most accessible form. Learner engagement is essential to information retention; instruction design is essential to meaningful learning. In this podcast, Marlene Steinheiser and Dawn Berndt, the INS clinical education team shares practical tips for developing department- or organizational-based education programs.  


    Marlene Steinheiser, PhD, RN, CRNI®

    Director of Clinical Education, INS

    Marlene Steinheiser, PhD, RN, CRNI®, is the Director of Clinical Education for INS. In her role, she directs the development of educational programs and resources for INS and develops strategic alliances with other organizations. She earned her PhD in nursing at the University of Arizona, conducting research focusing on compassion fatigue among healthcare professionals. A nurse for more than 32 years, Dr. Steinheiser has had experience in acute care, home infusion, long-term care, regulatory organizations, and academic nursing.

    Host: Dawn Berndt, DNP, RN, CRNI® – INS Clinical Education & Publications Manager

    Guest: Marlene M. Steinheiser, PhD, RN, CRNI® – INS Director of Clinical Education

    Abstract:

    Whether developing micro-learning capsules, traditional classroom lesson plans, or annual competency reviews, nursing education is designed to share specific information in its most accessible form. Learner engagement is essential to information retention; instruction design is essential to meaningful learning. In this podcast, Marlene Steinheiser and Dawn Berndt, the INS clinical education team shares practical tips for developing department- or organizational-based education programs. 

     

    Resources:

    Gorski LA, Hadaway L, Hagle ME, et al. Infusion therapy standards of practice. J Infus Nurs. 2021;44(suppl 1):S1-S224. doi:10.1097/NAN.0000000000000396

    Wright D. The Ultimate Guide to Competency Assessment in Health Care. 3rd edition. Minneapolis: Creative Health Care Management; 2005.

    Donna Wright - Creative Heath Car–e Management (chcm.com)



  • Prevention and Early Recognition of Infiltration and Extravasation

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 04/14/2021

    Infiltration and extravasation are inherent risks of IV therapy. Knowing how and why infiltration and extravasation may occur helps clinicians understand the practice standards for safe IV therapy. This webinar is the first of a two-part presentation. During this session, we will learn how implementing the 2021 INS Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice can maximize prevention of these iatrogenic injuries and facilitate prompt recognition for best treatment outcomes.

    Infiltration and extravasation are inherent risks of IV therapy. Knowing how and why infiltration and extravasation may occur helps clinicians understand the practice standards for safe IV therapy. This webinar is the first of a two-part presentation. During this session, we will learn how implementing the 2021 INS Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice can maximize prevention of these iatrogenic injuries and facilitate prompt recognition for best treatment outcomes.

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this webinar, learners will be able to: 

    1. Distinguish between infiltration and extravasation and describe how infiltrations/extravasations occur
    2. Identify risk factors and methods of preventing infiltration/extravasation
    3. Discuss barriers to prompt and appropriate treatment of infiltration/extravasation
    4. Select and apply an appropriate staging tool for extravasation symptoms


    Jennie Ong, PharmD

    Clinical Pharmacist

    Bryan Medical Center

    Dr. Jennie Ong has been a clinical pharmacist at Bryan Medical Center in Lincoln Nebraska for 10 years. As a result of 4 years of extensive research, Dr. Ong, along with co-author Ruth Van Gerpen, recently published "Recommendations for Management of Noncytotoxic Vesicant Extravasations". This is the first set of treatment recommendations based not only on extravasation principles but also on available published evidence. It was cited in the 2021 Infusion Nursing Society Standards of Practice.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: April 14, 2024

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Risk factors and characteristics of short peripheral intravenous catheter (PIVC) failure: Improving Patient Outcomes

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 03/24/2021

    Short peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) are a ubiquitous and necessary invasive clinical device. Although patient need for short PIVCs is high, one in three catheters will fail before the completion of treatment. To improve insertion and post insertion care, and reduce complications, there is an urgent need for substantial and interdisciplinary interventions. This presentation will provide an overview of recent short PIVC research, including a large systematic review of non-infectious complications for 76,997 short PIVCs; and a multivariate analysis of 12 studies (11,830 PIVCs) identifying patient, catheter and provider risk factors associated with failure.

    Short peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) are a ubiquitous and necessary invasive clinical device. Although patient need for short PIVCs is high, one in three catheters will fail before the completion of treatment. To improve insertion and post insertion care, and reduce complications, there is an urgent need for substantial and interdisciplinary interventions.

    This presentation will provide an overview of recent short PIVC research, including a large systematic review of non-infectious complications for 76,997 short PIVCs; and a multivariate analysis of 12 studies (11,830 PIVCs) identifying patient, catheter and provider risk factors associated with failure. 

    Learning Objectives:

    At the conclusion of this webinar, the participants will be able to:

    1. Describe non-infectious complications of short PIVCs (occlusions, dislodgement, leakage, and/or mechanical phlebitis).

    2. Understand the global impact of short PIVC complications and failure.

    3. Explain how understanding patient, catheter and provider risk factors can optimize short PIVC survival.  

    Dr Nicole Marsh, RN, MAdvPrac (healthcare research), PhD

    Clinical Trial Director for the Alliance for Vascular Access Teaching and Research

    Alliance for Vascular Access Teaching and Research (AVATAR)

    Dr Nicole Marsh’s research is focused on improving patient outcomes and decreasing complications associated with vascular access across the acute clinical care and community settings. She is the Nursing and Midwifery Director of Research at the Royal Brisbane and Women’s Hospital and the Clinical Trial Director for the Alliance for Vascular Access Teaching and Research (AVATAR; https://www.avatargroup.org.au/). In addition, she has been a Clinical Trial Coordinator for more than 30 single and multi-center vascular access clinical trials. Dr. Marsh has over 25 years of experience in acute care nursing.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: March 24, 2024

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Episode 73: March 26, 2021 - The Dirty Dozen: Contaminated Things

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Infection prevention in infusion therapy is crucial for safeguarding patient safety. Application of Aseptic Non Touch Technique (ANTT®) is essential for all infusion-related procedures. Listen as Maureen Burger and Dawn Berndt discuss 12 potential breaches in aseptic technique and describe the actions that knowledgeable clinicians will take to keep their patients safe.

    Listen as Maureen Burger and Dawn discuss the “Dirty Dozen,” or potential contamination events in infusion therapy.


    ​Maureen Burger MSN, RN, CPHQ, FACHE

    Chief Nursing Officer, Visante Inc.

    Visante Inc.

    Maureen Burger MSN, RN, CPHQ, FACHE, is the Chief Nursing Officer for Visante Inc., a medication management consulting firm. She has a long career in positions of progressive responsibility, both in nursing and hospital administration. Most recently, Maureen has served as Vice President of Quality, Safety, Risk, Accreditation, and Infection Control for Indiana University Health. As a consultant, she is thrilled to be able to focus her research, writing, and consulting on medication safety, especially when it involves IV push medications and drug diversion in healthcare. Ms. Burger obtained a master’s degree in Critical Care Nursing from Case Western Reserve University. She is certified in Healthcare Quality and is recognized as a Fellow by the American College of Healthcare Executives. When she is not advocating for patients and safety, Maureen, and her husband breed and race thoroughbred horses. Maureen lives in Indianapolis, IN. 

    Host: Dawn Berndt, DNP, RN, CRNI® – INS Clinical Education & Publications Manager

    Guest: Maureen Burger MSN, RN, CPHQ, FACHE

    Abstract:

    Infection prevention in infusion therapy is crucial for safeguarding patient safety. Application of Aseptic Non Touch Technique (ANTT®) is essential for all infusion-related procedures. Listen as Maureen Burger and Dawn Berndt discuss 12 potential breaches in aseptic technique and describe the actions that knowledgeable clinicians will take to keep their patients safe. 

    Resources:

    1. Gorski LA, Hadaway L, Hagle ME, et al. Infusion therapy standards of practice. J Infus Nurs. 2021;44(suppl 1):S1-S224. doi:10.1097/NAN.0000000000000396
    2. National Coalition for IV Push Safety: National Coalition for IV Push Safety (ncivps.org)

  • Point-of-Care Ultrasound to Identify Landmarks of the Proximal Humerus for Potential Use in Intraosseous Vascular Access: An Educational Journey to Improve Clinical Care

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 02/25/2021

    Establishing vascular access is of vital importance during resuscitation in cases of cardiac arrest. When obtaining peripheral or central intravenous access is difficult or impossible, intraosseous (IO) access is an alternative route for immediate fluid and medication delivery. The proximal humerus is one of the anatomic sites available for IO access, but the inability to identify its landmarks by palpation is considered an absolute contraindication for this procedure. During this webinar, our presenter will describe his educational journey that led to the initial descriptions of point-of-care ultrasonography to improve landmark identification of the proximal humerus and its potential use for intraosseous vascular access.

    Establishing vascular access is of vital importance during resuscitation in cases of cardiac arrest. When obtaining peripheral or central intravenous access is difficult or impossible, intraosseous (IO) access is an alternative route for immediate fluid and medication delivery. The proximal humerus is one of the anatomic sites available for IO access, but the inability to identify its landmarks by palpation is considered an absolute contraindication for this procedure.

    During this webinar, our presenter will describe his educational journey that led to the initial descriptions of point-of-care ultrasonography to improve landmark identification of the proximal humerus and its potential use for intraosseous vascular access.

    Learning Objectives:

    At the conclusion of this webinar, the participants will be able to:

    1. Recognize the importance of intraosseous (IO) access as an effective route to the intravascular space.

    2. Compare and contrast the landmark identification techniques of the proximal humerus by palpation vs. ultrasound.

    3. Recognize the value of deliberate practice and mastery learning principles for task-training acquisition.

    4. Describe the essential components of a curriculum-based simulation training program to improve competencies in IO access.

    Sergio Bustamante, MD, CHSE

    Anesthesiologist

    Department of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia at Cleveland Clinic

    Dr. Sergio Bustamante is a staff anesthesiologist in the Department of Cardiothoracic Anesthesia at Cleveland Clinic. He is the medical director of the Department's simulation laboratory and core faculty of the Simulation Center. Dr. Bustamante is also a clinical assistant professor at Cleveland Clinic Lerner College of Medicine at Case Western Reserve University and current Section Chair of Anesthesia at the Society for Simulation in Healthcare. He has a strong interest in healthcare education, task-training modalities, high-fidelity simulation, and debriefing.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: February 25, 2024

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.

    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.

  • Episode 72: March 3, 2021 - Vascular Access Device Complications

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Clinical expert Barb Nickel talks about the role of the nurse in preventing vascular access device complications through monitoring, assessment and timely intervention.

    Clinical expert Barb Nickel talks about the role of the nurse in preventing vascular access device complications through monitoring, assessment and timely intervention.  

    Barb Nickel, APRN-CNS, CCRN, CRNI®

    Clinical Nurse Specialist

    CHI Health St. Francis, Grand Island NE; CHI Health Center for Clinical Practice, Omaha, NE

    Ms Nickel is a clinical nurse specialist responsible for staff development, competency assessment, and process improvement to improve outcomes in multiple areas of clinical practice, including critical care, infusion therapy, sepsis, and new graduate transition to practice. She served as member, lead nurse planner, and chair of the INS National Council on Education from 2010-2016, developing the curriculum each year for the two annual INS conferences. She was named INS Member of the Year in 2016. Ms Nickel has presented regionally and nationally on infusion-related topics and has authored several publications on infusion therapy in the critical care setting. She also serves as faculty in the University of Nebraska Medical Center College of Nursing, BSN program.

    Host: Dawn Berndt, DNP, RN, CRNI® – INS Clinical Education & Publications Manager

    Guest: Barb Nickel, APRN-CNS, CCRN, CRNI®

    Abstract: Nurses must be competent to recognize signs and symptoms of vascular access device (VAD)-related complications at any juncture in the life of the device and be prepared to intervene during insertion, management, and removal. All vascular access devices are subject to complications that may cause patient harm, impair patients’ quality of life, or increase morbidity and mortality. Listen as Barb Nickel explains several VAD complications and discusses the role of the nurse in assessment and intervention. 

    Resources:

    • Gorski LA, Hadaway L, Hagle ME, et al. Infusion therapy standards of practice. J Infus Nurs. 2021;44(suppl 1):S1-S224. doi:10.1097/NAN.0000000000000396
    • Ray-Barruel G, Xu H, Marsh N, Cooke M, Rickard CM. Effectiveness of insertion and maintenance bundles in preventing peripheral intravenous catheter-related complications and bloodstream infection in hospital patients: a systematic review. Infect Dis Health. 2019;24(3):152-168. doi:10.1016/j.idh.2019.03.001
    • Helm RE, Klausner JD, Klemperer JD, Flint LM, Huang E. Accepted but unacceptable: peripheral iv catheter failure. J Infus Nurs. 2015;38(3):189-203. doi:10.1097/NAN.0000000000000100
    • Nickel B. Hiding in plain sight: the burden of peripheral intravenous catheter infections. Crit Care Nurse. 2020;40(5):57-66. doi:10.4037/ccn2020439
    • Nickel B. Peripheral intravenous administration of high-risk infusions in critical care: a risk-benefit analysis. Crit Care Nurse. 2019;39(6):16-28. doi:10.4037/ccn2019443
    • Berndt, D. & Steinheiser, M. (2019b). Central vascular access device complications: The nurse's role at each point of care. American Nurse Today,14(10), 6-13. www.myamericannurse.com Berndt, D. & Steinheiser, M. (2019a). Short peripheral and midline catheter complications: The nurse's role at each point of care. American Nurse Today,14(9), 5-10. www.myamericannurse.com

  • Resetting the Standards: Examining the 2021 Changes Virtual Conference

    Contains 8 Product(s)

    The Standards of Practice committee will explore some of the changes that can be found in the newest edition of the Standards. During each day, there will be an opportunity for attendees to engage with members of the committee to ask clarifying questions and to discuss how these changes will impact clinical practice. At the conclusion of the meeting you will be able to claim contact hours and CRNI® recertification units.

    The Standards of Practice committee will explore some of the changes that can be found in the newest edition of the Standards. During each day, there will be an opportunity for attendees to engage with members of the committee to ask clarifying questions and to discuss how these changes will impact clinical practice. At the conclusion of the meeting you will be able to claim contact hours and CRNI® recertification units. 

  • Perceptions of Adult Hospitalized Patients with Difficult Venous Access Experiencing Short Peripheral Catheter Insertion: An Opportunity for Clinicians to Improve Patients’ Experiences

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 01/27/2021

    Hospitalized patients require venous access for procedures, treatments, or therapies. The short peripheral catheter (SPC) is one option for patients who need intravenous (IV) access. Patients with difficult vasculature sometimes require multiple attempts to obtain SPC access. This session will explore the perceptions and experiences of patients with difficult access, requiring multiple attempts to obtain SPC access. Ways clinicians can improve the patient’s experience will also be discussed.

    Hospitalized patients require venous access for procedures, treatments, or therapies. The short peripheral catheter (SPC) is one option for patients who need intravenous (IV) access. Patients with difficult vasculature sometimes require multiple attempts to obtain SPC access. This session will explore the perceptions and experiences of patients with difficult access, requiring multiple attempts to obtain SPC access. Ways clinicians can improve the patient’s experience will also be discussed. 

    Learning Objectives: At the conclusion of this webinar, learners will be able to: 

    a) describe the physical and emotional impact the SPC insertion may have on a patient with difficult venous access and

    b) identify at least three measures to improve the experience of the patient with difficult access.

    Ann Plohal, PhD, RN, ACNS-BC, CRNI®, VA-BC

    Vascular Access Team

    St. Joseph Hospital Medical Center

    Dr. Ann Plohal received her PhD in 2015. She wrote her dissertation on the patient perception of short peripheral catheter insertion for patients with difficult access. Ann is past president of the Infusion Nurses Society. She has published multiple articles regarding infusion therapy and is an active infusion and vascular access nurse.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: January 27, 2024

    To receive contact hours for this educational activity, you are required to attend the entire educational activity and complete the evaluation.


    The Infusion Nurses Society is approved as a provider of continuing nursing education by the California Board of Registered Nursing, provider #CEP14209. The certificate must be retained by the attendee for a period of 4 years.