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  • Virtual Conference: The Spectrum of Sepsis

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    Early recognition and treatment of sepsis is critical to surviving this life-threatening syndrome. Each year in the United States, sepsis claims more lives than breast cancer, prostate cancer, and HIV combined. Those who survive face chronic physical, cognitive, and psychological challenges as a result of the damage caused by the body’s response to the simplest infections. The sessions presented provide an opportunity to learn about the battle against this life-threatening condition—from diagnosis to discharge and beyond. This entire program has been approved for 5 contact hours and 10 CRNI® RUs and meets the INS Meeting criteria.

    The Spectrum of Sepsis

    Early recognition and treatment of sepsis is critical to surviving this life-threatening syndrome. Each year in the United States, sepsis claims more lives than breast cancer, prostate cancer, and HIV combined. Those who survive face chronic physical, cognitive, and psychological challenges as a result of the damage caused by the body's response to the simplest infections. The sessions presented provide an opportunity to learn about the battle against this life-threatening condition—from diagnosis to discharge and beyond.

    The Virtual Conference is supported by a continuing nursing education grant from:

    B | Braun


    More Than an Infection

    9:00 - 10:00 AM EST
    • Primary focus in public health
    • The immune system and altered hemodynamics
    • Key components in sepsis treatment

    Sepsis 3.0: Revised Sepsis Guidelines and the Impact on Practice

    10:00 - 11:00 AM EST
    • Early recognition of sepsis and prompt intervention
    • Current definitions of systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS)
    • Prevention and management of catheter-related bloodstream infections

    How EMRs Improve Sepsis Outcomes

    11:00 AM - 12:00 PM EST
    • Integrate technology, data and analytics to clinical practice
    • "Track and trigger" systems, and early warning system alerts
    • Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) classified sepsis as a core measure

    Virtual Exhibit Hall

    12:00 - 1:30 PM EST
    • View latest innovations in the infusion field
    • Extend your education and connect with industry leaders
    • Enjoy this exhibit hall experience right from you PC

    First Contact: "Nurses Know Sepsis"

    1:30 - 2:30 PM EST
    • Third leading cause of death in the U.S
    • Nurse are front line in advocating for patients
    • Communicate early sepsis interventions

    Carry On: Life Beyond Sepsis

    2:30 - 3:30 PM EST
    • Case study on unmet medical needs
    • Post sepsis Syndrome (PSS) survival
    • Sepsis survivor sharing his journey

    Virtual Exhibit Hall

    3:30 - 5:30 PM EST


    More Than an Infection

    Thomas Ahrens, PhD, RN, FAAN
    9:00 - 10:00 AM EST

    In this program, recent improvements in the understanding and treatment of sepsis will be presented. A review of past therapies and the recent introduction of newer treatments for sepsis will be discussed. Updates from the Surviving Sepsis Campaign will be presented, as will recent studies that address the management of sepsis. Controversies in the treatment and identification of sepsis will be reviewed, as well as case studies using novel treatments in the care of the patient with sepsis. The emphasis on early identification and how to implement protocols in hospitals, from the emergency department and floor to the intensive care unit will be highlighted. The program emphasizes innovative learning strategies in an attempt to help the learner retain more information as well as make the program a more enjoyable event.

    Session Learning Objectives
    1. Identify the reasons sepsis is one of the most important public health issues.
    2. Understand the role of inflammation, endothelial cell dysfunction, and altered hemodynamics in severe sepsis.
    3. Identification of the role of the nurse in the identification and assessment of the patient in severe sepsis.
    4. Discuss how use of lactate, ScvO2, and potentially StO2 can aid in evaluation of the severity of sepsis.
    5. Discuss the key components of sepsis treatment.

    Sepsis 3.0: Revised Sepsis Guidelines and the Impact on Practice

    Michael Taylor, MD
    10:00 - 11:00 AM EST

    Sepsis is the most important under-recognized medical problem in the United States. It affects well over one million people each year and continues to carry a high mortality. Sepsis survivors remain at significant risk for additional morbidity and mortality. Early recognition and prompt intervention are the cornerstones of treatment for this time-sensitive problem. However, there is no definitive test for sepsis, and screening of patients is a formidable challenge. The difficulties in identifying the septic patient has led many to question the current definitions. In this session, we will review the current definitions of systemic inflammatory response syndrome, severe sepsis, and septic shock, and then consider the suggested changes proposed in a special communication published in the Journal of the American Medical Association earlier this year. We will also examine key elements of the Surviving Sepsis Guidelines with specific attention to the prevention and management of catheter-related bloodstream infections.

    Session Learning Objectives
    1. Recall current definition of SIRS.
    2. Incoporate sepsis guidlines into practice.

    How EMRs Improve Sepsis Outcomes

    Fiona Winterbottom, DNP, MSN, APRN, ACNS- BC, CCRN
    11:00 - 12:00 EST

    Efforts to raise awareness and recognition of sepsis is in the forefront of health care providers. Use of “track-and-trigger" systems, such as electronic medical records (EMRs) and early warning systems, have been identified as one mechanism to leverage technology in early identification and treatment of sepsis. Infusion nurses play an important role in understanding best practice alerts and the correlation to guiding antibiotic administration for prompt sepsis treatment and positive patient outcomes.

    Session Learning Objectives
    1. Outline the need to integrate technology, data, and analytics to daily clinical practice.
    2. Provide an example of an electronic workflow that was designed in partnership with the front line clinical interdisciplinary team.

    Virtual Exhibit Hall
    12:00 - 1:30 PM EST


    First Contact: “Nurses Know Sepsis"

    Laura Messineo, MHA, BS, RN
    1:30 - 2:30 PM EST

    Sepsis is a toxic response to infection that kills more than a quarter million Americans each year--more than breast, lung and prostate cancer combined. In fact, sepsis is the third-leading cause of death in the United States. Twenty percent of sepsis cases are hospital-acquired. Nurses are the front line clinicians suspecting sepsis and advocating for their patients. It is vital for nurses to know the early warning signs of sepsis and to implement evidence-based treatments to reduce sepsis complications and mortality. Sepsis is a medical emergency that requires prompt identification and treatment so that more patients survive.

    Session Learning Objectives
    1. Recognize the early warning signs of sepsis.
    2. Communicate the early sepsis interventions needed for patients.

    Carry On: Life Beyond Sepsis

    Carl Flatley, DDS, MD and Chris Kuchnicki
    2:30 - 3:30 PM EST

    Carl Flatley, MD, will discuss how nurses are the key to decreasing sepsis mortality and morbidity, with infusion nurses a critical component in recognition of post-sepsis syndrome. Though mountains have been moved in recognizing post-sepsis syndrome, more than 3.5 million people continue to perish or suffer from organ dysfunctions, amputations, and cognitive problems. Sepsis is in fact the number 1 unmet medical need in the United States. This presentation will include several case studies: one of the untimely death of a young woman and the second a sepsis survivor sharing his journey. Having survived a life-altering septic event, attendees will hear from a survivor, Chris Kuchnicki, as he shares his journey and life experiences. Post-sepsis syndrome is becoming widely recognized in the medical community, with nurses playing a role in advocating and preparing sepsis patients for discharge home and life beyond the diagnosis.

    Session Learning Objectives
    1. Recognize impact of post sepsis syndrome on surviors
    2. Recall nurses role in post sepsis education

    Virtual Exhibit Hall
    3:30 - 5:30 PM EST

    Contact Hours/CE Credit

    This entire program has been approved for 5 contact hours. Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: November 4, 2019

    CRNI Recertification Units

    This entire program has been approved for 10 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the INS Meeting criteria.

    *Note: Participants who attend the live version of this program at the 2016 National Academy in Cincinnati, OH are not eligible to receive contact hours or CRNI® recertification units through this online program.

    Thomas Ahrens, PhD, RN, FAAN

    Barnes Jewish

    Tom Ahrens, PhD, RN, FAAN, is a research scientist at Barnes Jewish Hospital. He is actively involved in sepsis education and technology application, particularly in terms of hemodynamic monitoring and capnography. His book, "Essentials of Oxygenation," was an American Journal of Nursing Book of the Year. In 2004, Tom was inducted into the American Academy of Nursing. From 2006 to 2008 he was the American Association of Critical-Care Nurses' representative to the Surviving Sepsis Campaign.

    Michael Taylor, MD

    Fairview Hospital

    On completing a general surgery residency and critical care fellowship, Dr. Taylor entered private practice as a trauma surgeon and intensivist, After 7 years, he joined the Cleveland Clinic. In his roles as intensivist as well as board member of the Sepsis Alliance, he frequently helps train teams in care of the septic patient.

    Fiona Winterbottom, DNP, MSN, APRN, ACNS- BC, CCRN

    Ochsner

    Dr. Winterbottom has worked as a nurse for 25 years with most of that time in critical care. She has worked in two countries and seven states in various types of intensive care units. She has been clinical nurse specialist since 2007, and has presented widely on sepsis, resuscitation, interdisciplinary teamwork, and advanced practice nursing.

    Laura Messineo, MHA, BS, RN

    Presence Health

    Laura Messineo has extensive clinical experience managing professionals in critical-care environments and has spent a decade educating clinicians on the early-warning signs of sepsis. Laura is a national speaker, a member of a number of professional organizations, and a Sepsis Alliance board member. One of her passions is raising community awareness of sepsis, so each year she spearheads the Illinois Sepsis Challenge 5K to increase sepsis awareness.

    Carl Flatley, DDS, MD

    Sepsis Alliance

    A retired physician and dentist, Dr. Flatley lost a healthy daughter to septic shock in 2002. He founded the Sepsis Alliance and has been involved in the issue of sepsis globally at all levels.

    Chris Kuchnicki

    Flight Attendant

    In 2014, Flight Attendant Chris Kuchnicki's life changed forever after being hospitalized for Asthma. A staph infection he contracted while hospitalized caused "the perfect storm" of events after he was released. Chris talks about how Sepsis changed his life, career, and what living with Post Sepsis Syndrome has been like. He uses his free time help to spread awareness to others.

  • Report Card on the Handling of Hazardous Drugs: Is Your Facility Ready for USP Chapter <800>?

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    ​Is your facility ready for the new chemotherapy handling requirements? A survey sponsored by BD shows that pharmacists and nurses may not be as ready as we think…

    Is your facility ready for the new chemotherapy handling requirements? A survey sponsored by BD shows that pharmacists and nurses may not be as ready as we think…

    The recently published United States Pharmacopeia (USP) Chapter <800> establishes requirements for the safe handling of chemotherapy and other hazardous drugs (HDs) in healthcare settings. However, research indicates a lack of awareness among many healthcare professionals about the dangers of HD exposure, attitudinal and behavioral differences among pharmacists and nurses who compound or administer HDs and gaps between USP <800> requirements and current practices.

  • Noncytotoxic Vesicant Medications and Solutions

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    INS established a vesicant task force with the goal of developing an evidence-based list of noncytotoxic vesicant medications/solutions. Outside of oncology practice, there is not a list of noncytotoxic vesicants as established by a ­professional­ organization. ­INS ­identified ­the ­need ­to ­­address ­this ­gap ­based on ­the­ following­ ­premise:­the­ first­ step ­in­ preventing ­extravasation ­is ­the ­identification ­and ­recognition ­of ­vesicant­ drugs and solutions. The scope of work was limited to creating an evidence-based list of noncytotoxic vesicant medications/solutions and developing an extravasation checklist that outlines risk reduction strategies including early recognition of signs and symptoms of extravasation.

    INS established a vesicant task force with the goal of developing an evidence-based list of noncytotoxic vesicant medications/solutions.

    Outside of oncology practice, there is not a list of noncytotoxic vesicants as established by a professional­ organization. ­INS ­identified ­the ­need ­to ­­address ­this ­gap ­based on ­the­ following­ premise:­the­ first­ step ­in­ preventing ­extravasation ­is ­the ­identification ­and ­recognition ­of ­vesicant­ drugs and solutions.

    The scope of work was limited to creating an evidence-based list of noncytotoxic vesicant medications/solutions and developing an extravasation checklist that outlines risk reduction strategies including early recognition of signs and symptoms of extravasation.

  • The Role of Unlicensed Assistive Personnel (UAP) in the Provision of Infusion Therapy

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    INS convened a task force of infusion therapy experts from various practice settings to review and update INS’ position on the use of unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) in the provision of infusion therapy.

    INS convened a task force of infusion therapy experts from various practice settings to review and update INS' position on the use of unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) in the provision of infusion therapy.

  • Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice 2016

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar will discuss the recently revised Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice. The presentation will include a brief description of changes as compared to the 2011 Standards, an overview of the methodology used to develop the Standards, and the presentation of selected standards with new or changed recommendations

    Overview: As the recognized global authority in infusion therapy, INS is committed to advancing the specialty through evidence-based practice and research. A major component of that commitment is the development of standards of practice for all clinicians involved in infusion therapy. This webinar will discuss the recently revised Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice. The presentation will include a brief description of changes as compared to the 2011 Standards, an overview of the methodology used to develop the Standards, and the presentation of selected standards with new or changed recommendations.

    Lisa A. Gorski, RN, MS, HHCNS,BC, CRNI®, FAAN

    Clinical nurse specialist

    Lisa Gorski, MS, RN, HHCNS-BC, CRNI® has more than 30 years of professional experience in the fields of home care and home infusion therapy. She is currently the chairperson for the INS Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice 2021 revision committee and served as INS president from 2007-2008. She is the author of numerous journal articles and several books including Fast Facts for Nurses About Home Infusion Therapy. Lisa speaks globally on a variety of infusion therapy-related topics. 

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

  • Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice Crosswalk: 2011/2016

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    This document highlights the notable revisions of the 2011 Infusion Nursing Standards of Practice to the current 2016 Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice. Clinicians are strongly encouraged to review the entire publication to help ensure infusion practices follow the most current evidenced-based data.

    This document highlights the notable revisions of the 2011 Infusion Nursing Standards of Practice to the current 2016 Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice. Clinicians are strongly encouraged to review the entire publication to help ensure infusion practices follow the most current evidenced-based data.
  • Short Peripheral Catheter (SPC) Checklist: Think Safety, Insert Safely

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    The SPC Checklist was developed by and for infusion nurses to promote safe practices from start to finish of peripheral infusion therapy.

    The SPC Checklist was developed by and for infusion nurses to promote safe practices from start to finish of peripheral infusion therapy.

  • Making the Business Case for Infusion Teams: The Purpose, People, and Process

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    Currently, some hospitals enjoy the financial and clinical benefits of infusion nurse specialists working on infusion teams. The goal for this paper is to educate infusion nurse leaders about the process needed to make the business case for infusion teams. This information will educate nurses about how to convert the care they provide and the outcomes they produce into financial terms, a skill that is critical to enhance communication with executive officers and other decision makers within the hospital.

    Currently, some hospitals enjoy the financial and clinical benefits of infusion nurse specialists working on infusion teams. The goal for this paper is to educate infusion nurse leaders about the process needed to make the business case for infusion teams. This information will educate nurses about how to convert the care they provide and the outcomes they produce into financial terms, a skill that is critical to enhance communication with executive officers and other decision makers within the hospital.

  • Infusion Teams in Acute Care Hospitals: Call for a Business Approach: An Infusion Nurses Society White Paper

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    The need to provide quality infusion nursing care with skilled, knowledgeable, and competent nurses is strategic and necessary for the health care organization. By minimizing liability, infusion care delivery will be enhanced through the use of infusion nurse experts. As a result, INS has developed a white paper on the use of infusion teams in acute care hospitals.

    The need to provide quality infusion nursing care with skilled, knowledgeable, and competent nurses is strategic and necessary for the health care organization. By minimizing liability, infusion care delivery will be enhanced through the use of infusion nurse experts. As a result, INS has developed a white paper on the use of infusion teams in acute care hospitals.

  • Recommendations for Frequency of Assessment of the Short Peripheral Catheter Site Position Paper

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    As many organizations choose to follow the Infusion Nurses Society (INS) recommendations for peripheral intravenous (IV) site rotation based on clinical indications rather than a specific time frame, INS recognizes the critical importance of site assessment to identify any signs of complications.

    As many organizations choose to follow the Infusion Nurses Society (INS) recommendations for peripheral intravenous (IV) site rotation based on clinical indications rather than a specific time frame, INS recognizes the critical importance of site assessment to identify any signs of complications.