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  • IgNS Daybreak Symposium: Incorporating Evidence-based Best Practices Into Care of the Ig Patient

    Contains 2 Component(s) Recorded On: 05/08/2017

    After the session, attendees will understand the importance of patient ­assessments specific to Ig therapy; be able to list risk factors of Ig therapy and describe management of and emergency preparedness; be able to discuss Ig dosing, product differences, and administration practices, and how each ­impacts patient outcomes; and understand the importance of the ­procurement and reimbursement landscape, including the 21st Century Cures Act (HR 6) and the impact to the patient’s treatment plan and outcomes.

    The Ig nurse’s role is of critical importance in ensuring optimal patient outcomes are actualized for patients requiring immunoglobulin therapy. The use of evidence-based standards of practice, such as the IgNS Therapy Standards of Practice, is increasingly important in everyday practice across the care continuum. This session will provide information and strategies for the Ig nurse to become equipped to assess patients and develop a treatment plan, educate the patients on their disease and treatment options, and ensure they have optimal clinical outcomes and quality of care. When necessary, the Ig nurse needs to be an advocate for the patient, assisting him or her in areas of reimbursement, medical care, support services, etc. Today’s health care landscape provides unique challenges and dynamics, and a discussion on how this impacts Ig care will conclude the presentation.

    Learning Objectives

    After the session, attendees will understand the importance of patient ­assessments specific to Ig therapy; be able to list risk factors of Ig therapy and describe management of and emergency preparedness; be able to discuss Ig dosing, product differences, and administration practices, and how each ­impacts patient outcomes; and understand the importance of the ­procurement and reimbursement landscape, including the 21st Century Cures Act (HR 6) and the impact to the patient’s treatment plan and outcomes.

    CRNI Recert Units: 2                                                                    
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS 2017 in Minneapolis, MN are not eligible to receive CRNI® recertification units through this online program.

    Jane Kirmse, MS, APRN, CNS, IgCN

    IgNS Standards of Practice and Education Development Committee Member

    Mayo Clinic

    Stacey Ness, RPh, CSP, MSCS, AAHIVP

    IgNS Standards of Practice and Education Development Committee Member

    Managed Health Care Associates, Inc.

    Amy Clarke, RN, IgCN

    Director of Nursing Clinical Program Services

    Amy Clarke, RN, IgCN, is the director of nursing clinical program services for Diplomat Specialty Infusion Group. Involved in specialty and home infusion services since 1994, she has performed more than 2,000 intravenous and subcutaneous infusions. Ms. Clarke has delivered numerous presentations on immunoglobulin administration, including continuing education sessions for the National Home Infusion Association and the Immunoglobulin Nursing Society (IgNS). She is the immediate past president of IgNS. 

  • Qualification or Certification?

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 05/08/2017

    After the session, attendees will be able to identify the difference between ­qualification and certification and the value of each.

    Employers are fighting for employees and looking for ways to promote their organization. One way to promote quality for an organization is to recognize their nurses’ skills. Nurses are competing for their dream job and need to promote their skill sets to be considered. Both situations result in nurses ­highlighting specific special skill sets to others. Terms often used for this highlighted focus is qualification or certification. While these terms are frequently used interchangeably, they mean very different things. This session will delineate between qualification and certification and discuss the value each brings to the nurse when competing for positions.

    Learning Objectives

    After the session, attendees will be able to identify the difference between ­qualification and certification and the value of each.

    Laurie Ellefson, BSN, RN, CWOCN, CFCN

    Faculty, Western Technical College

    CRNI® RUs: 2                                                                       
    This entire program has been approved for 2 CRNI® recertification units and meets the INS Meeting criteria.                                                               
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS 2017 in Minneapolis, MN are not eligible to receive CRNI® recertification units through this online program.

    Contact Hours: 1                                                             
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS 2017 in Minneapolis, MN are not eligible to receive contact hours through this online program.

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: May 8, 2020

  • CDC Guidelines and Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice: Defining the Difference

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 05/07/2017

    After the session, attendees will be able to apply the 2016 Infusion Therapy ­Standards of Practice and the 2011 CDC BSI guidelines, and analyze the differences between the two.

    INS’ 2016 Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice provides the framework that guides clinical ­practice. The CDC bloodstream infection (BSI) guidelines were created to produce evidence-based recommendations to prevent ­catheter-related bloodstream infections. In this session, a panel of ­experts will compare and contrast the differences between the two sets of standards and guidelines.

    Learning Objectives

    After the session, attendees will be able to apply the 2016 Infusion Therapy ­Standards of Practice and the 2011 CDC BSI guidelines, and analyze the differences between  the two.

    Mary Alexander, MA, RN, CRNI®, CAE, FAAN

    Chief Executive Officer, INS

    Mary Alexander, MA, RN, CRNI®, CAE, FAAN, has served as CEO of the Infusion Nurses Society (INS) and Infusion Nurses Certification Corporation since 1997. She is also editor-in-chief of the Journal of Infusion Nursing, the Core Curriculum for Infusion Nursing, and INS’ textbook, Infusion Nursing: An Evidence-Based Approach. In addition, Mary represented INS on the panel that revised the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Guidelines for the Prevention of Intravascular Catheter-Related Infections in 2011. She speaks globally on topics such as the benefits of the specialty practice of infusion nursing, the development of standards of practice, and improving patient safety.

    Mary Hagle, PhD, RN-BC, FAAN

    Nurse Scientist

    Mary Hagle, PhD, RN-BC, FAAN, has more than 30 years of clinical experience and works a consultant for evidence-based practice, clinically focused research, and infusion therapy. She has primarily practiced as an oncology clinical nurse specialist and researcher in a variety of settings in the midwestern United States. Mary is currently is a research scientist at the Milwaukee VA medical center where she facilitates and conducts research, translates best evidence into practice, and supervises patient safety and post-doctoral fellows. Mary is a co-author of the Infusion Nurses Society’s Standards of Practice for Infusion Therapy, 2011 and 2016 editions. She is also an author of several book chapters on evidence-based practice and infusion therapy, as well as editor of the latest edition of Plumer’s Principles and Practice of Infusion Therapy.  

      

    Barb Nickel, APRN-CNS, NP-C, CRNI®, CCRN

    Clinical Nurse Specialist

    Barb Nickel, APRN-CNS, NP-C, CRNI®, CCRN, has extensive experience in the application of evidence-based guidelines relevant to infusion therapy practice. As a clinical nurse specialist, she is actively involved in infusion-related process improvement at the facility and statewide level, regarding topics such as CLABSI prevention, new graduate training, and smart pump drug library standardization. From 2011 to 2016, Ms. Nickel was a member, then chair/lead nurse-planner for INS’ National Council on Education. She was also a reviewer for both the 2011 and the 2016 Infusion Nursing Standards of Practice.

    Mark Rupp, MD

    Professor

    University of Nebraska Medical Center


    CRNI® RUs: 4                                                                      
    This entire program has been approved for 4 CRNI® recertification units and meets the INS Meeting criteria.                                                                    
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS 2017 in Minneapolis, MN are not eligible to receive CRNI® recertification units through this online program.

    Contact Hours: 2                                                             
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS 2017 in Minneapolis, MN are not eligible to receive contact hours through this online program.

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: May 8, 2020

  • ASPEN Guidelines for Parenteral Nutrition: An Update

    Contains 2 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 05/06/2017

    Infusion nurses give parenteral nutrition in every practice setting. Since 1975, the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) has led in the science and practice of clinical nutrition. ASPEN guidelines assist practitioners in providing best practices in specific circumstances, such as neonates at risk for necrotizing enterocolitis, pediatric patients with intestinal failure, and adult hyperglycemia or obesity. This session will review current ASPEN guidelines for the provision and ­assessment of nutritional therapy.

    Infusion nurses give parenteral nutrition in every practice setting. Since 1975, the American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition (ASPEN) has led in the science and practice of clinical nutrition. ASPEN guidelines assist  practitioners in providing best practices in specific circumstances, such as neonates at risk for necrotizing enterocolitis, pediatric patients with intestinal failure, and adult hyperglycemia or obesity. This session will review current ASPEN guidelines for the provision and ­assessment of nutritional therapy.

    Learning Objectives

    After the session, attendees will be able to identify a goal of ­parenteral ­nutrition therapy and an assessment tool for nutritional support.

    Contact Hours: 1                                                              
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS 2017 in Minneapolis, MN are not eligible to receive contact hours through this online program.

    CRNI Recert Units: 2                                                                     
    *Note: Participants who attended the live version of this program at INS 2017 in Minneapolis, MN are not eligible to receive CRNI® recertification units through this online program.

    Gordan Sacks, Pharm.D., BCNSP

    Professor and Department Head

    Auburn University Harrison School of Pharmacy

  • Pediatric Hemophilia Care and Treatment

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits Recorded On: 01/24/2017

    Hemophilia is a congenital blood disorder that prevents the formation of fibrin, which allows for sustained clotting. People with hemophilia are missing or have reduced amounts of this important clotting factor, so bleeding continues until they receive treatment. Hemophilia is not a disorder that is often seen in a hospital setting, and because of the variety of factor deficits and classifications, the care of each patient differs. The care and nursing management of a pediatric patient with hemophilia is often intimidating for the family, as well as for the professional care giver.

    Hemophilia is a congenital blood disorder that prevents the formation of fibrin, which allows for sustained clotting. People with hemophilia are missing or have reduced amounts of this important clotting factor, so bleeding continues until they receive treatment.

    Hemophilia is not a disorder that is often seen in a hospital setting, and because of the variety of factor deficits and classifications, the care of each patient differs. The care and nursing management of a pediatric patient with hemophilia is often intimidating for the family, as well as for the professional care giver.

    Catherine J. Taggart, RN, CRNI®, IgCN, MBA

    President and CEO, Agility Infusion Services

    Catherine has worked within the Baxter/Baxalta organization as a Medical Affairs Nurse Specialist and as home infusion clinician for more than 25 years. She has extensive infusion knowledge in a variety of clinical settings employing cutting edge therapies and methods. She has participated in several clinical study trials targeting positive patient outcomes, bringing the results to publication. She is a seasoned infusion professional and has great passion for the patient.

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

    Expiration date for receipt of contact hours: January 24, 2020

  • Report Card on the Handling of Hazardous Drugs: Is Your Facility Ready for USP Chapter <800>?

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    ​Is your facility ready for the new chemotherapy handling requirements? A survey sponsored by BD shows that pharmacists and nurses may not be as ready as we think…

    Is your facility ready for the new chemotherapy handling requirements? A survey sponsored by BD shows that pharmacists and nurses may not be as ready as we think…

    The recently published United States Pharmacopeia (USP) Chapter <800> establishes requirements for the safe handling of chemotherapy and other hazardous drugs (HDs) in healthcare settings. However, research indicates a lack of awareness among many healthcare professionals about the dangers of HD exposure, attitudinal and behavioral differences among pharmacists and nurses who compound or administer HDs and gaps between USP <800> requirements and current practices.

  • Noncytotoxic Vesicant Medications and Solutions

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    INS established a vesicant task force with the goal of developing an evidence-based list of noncytotoxic vesicant medications/solutions. Outside of oncology practice, there is not a list of noncytotoxic vesicants as established by a ­professional­ organization. ­INS ­identified ­the ­need ­to ­­address ­this ­gap ­based on ­the­ following­ ­premise:­the­ first­ step ­in­ preventing ­extravasation ­is ­the ­identification ­and ­recognition ­of ­vesicant­ drugs and solutions. The scope of work was limited to creating an evidence-based list of noncytotoxic vesicant medications/solutions and developing an extravasation checklist that outlines risk reduction strategies including early recognition of signs and symptoms of extravasation.

    INS established a vesicant task force with the goal of developing an evidence-based list of noncytotoxic vesicant medications/solutions.

    Outside of oncology practice, there is not a list of noncytotoxic vesicants as established by a professional­ organization. ­INS ­identified ­the ­need ­to ­­address ­this ­gap ­based on ­the­ following­ premise:­the­ first­ step ­in­ preventing ­extravasation ­is ­the ­identification ­and ­recognition ­of ­vesicant­ drugs and solutions.

    The scope of work was limited to creating an evidence-based list of noncytotoxic vesicant medications/solutions and developing an extravasation checklist that outlines risk reduction strategies including early recognition of signs and symptoms of extravasation.

  • The Role of Unlicensed Assistive Personnel (UAP) in the Provision of Infusion Therapy

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    INS convened a task force of infusion therapy experts from various practice settings to review and update INS’ position on the use of unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) in the provision of infusion therapy.

    INS convened a task force of infusion therapy experts from various practice settings to review and update INS' position on the use of unlicensed assistive personnel (UAP) in the provision of infusion therapy.

  • Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice 2016

    Contains 3 Component(s), Includes Credits

    This webinar will discuss the recently revised Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice. The presentation will include a brief description of changes as compared to the 2011 Standards, an overview of the methodology used to develop the Standards, and the presentation of selected standards with new or changed recommendations

    Overview: As the recognized global authority in infusion therapy, INS is committed to advancing the specialty through evidence-based practice and research. A major component of that commitment is the development of standards of practice for all clinicians involved in infusion therapy. This webinar will discuss the recently revised Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice. The presentation will include a brief description of changes as compared to the 2011 Standards, an overview of the methodology used to develop the Standards, and the presentation of selected standards with new or changed recommendations.

    Lisa A. Gorski, RN, MS, HHCNS,BC, CRNI®, FAAN

    Clinical nurse specialist

    Lisa Gorski, MS, RN, HHCNS-BC, CRNI® has more than 30 years of professional experience in the fields of home care and home infusion therapy. She is currently the chairperson for the INS Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice 2021 revision committee and served as INS president from 2007-2008. She is the author of numerous journal articles and several books including Fast Facts for Nurses About Home Infusion Therapy. Lisa speaks globally on a variety of infusion therapy-related topics. 

    CRNI® RUs: This session has been approved for 1 CRNI® recertification unit and meets the non INS Meeting criteria.

    Contact Hours: This session has been approved for 1 contact hour

  • Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice Crosswalk: 2011/2016

    Contains 1 Component(s)

    This document highlights the notable revisions of the 2011 Infusion Nursing Standards of Practice to the current 2016 Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice. Clinicians are strongly encouraged to review the entire publication to help ensure infusion practices follow the most current evidenced-based data.

    This document highlights the notable revisions of the 2011 Infusion Nursing Standards of Practice to the current 2016 Infusion Therapy Standards of Practice. Clinicians are strongly encouraged to review the entire publication to help ensure infusion practices follow the most current evidenced-based data.